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BACK THOSE 
DEBATING TEAMS 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



BURY MUHLENBERG, I 

ST. MARY'S, GEORGETOWN | 

I 

i 



VOLUME II 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1927 



NUMBER ^ 



Basketball Season Opens in Fine Style 
With Two Victories Against One Defeat 

Juniata and St. Francis Bow to Mighty L. V. Team, while Penn 
State Wins by Narrow Margin — New Men 
Showing Up Well 



In the initial game of the season, 
Lebanon Valley defeated Juniata Col- 
lege, at Huntingdon, Thursday even- 
ing by the score of 30-28. The game 
was closely contested throughout 
which can be easily seen by the com- 
paratively close score. It was a com- 
plete surprise to the Huntington quin- 
tette who were intent on winning the 
game. Good teamwork throughout on 
both sides featured the game and 
added additional interest. At various 
times both teams were leading. Juni- 
ata, at the end of the first. half led 
by the score of 16-14. Then Lebanon 
Valley took a spurt forward and 
changed the score to 25-18. Juniata 
retaliated and tied the score and an 
additional point on a foul. In a min- 
ute the local boys again led 30-27. 
During the last second a foul on 

(.Continued on Page Three) 



Lebanon Valley 
Soon To Have 
Co-ed Debating 

Steps in Organization Have Al- 
ready Been Taken With 
Much Interest 



Lebanon Valley College is going to 
have a girls' debating team. The 
signs of the times are very bright, 
and this new star will certainly find 
a place among them. Agitation, on 
this score, has been promoted for over 
a year and finally reached a culmi- 
nation when the question was taken 
up by the two girls' literary societies. 
It was discussed in each group, and 
any one who felt especially interested 
was asked to hand her name to a 
chosen representative. 

The first meeting of this new cam- 
pus light was held on Tuesday, Jan. 
4th. Much interest was displayed by 
as many as attended. In fact, there 
was no difficulty along the line of 
"pep". It was right there. The diffi- 
culty lay in this that so many folks, 
who should have been there, forgot 
to come. Success or failure may de- 
pend on you ? How do you know 
that you aren't the one who can serve 
the school better than any other? 
There is no better opportunity to de- 
velop reasoning and argumentative 
powers than that afforded by debat- 
ing. Girls, if you are anxious to know 
more about vital national and inter- 
national questions, enter your note- 
book and brain on behalf of the de- 
bating team. Why? 

Listen: A second challenge has 
come to our girls from the girls of 
Washington College, Maryland. Re- 
member that this is a second chal- 
lenge. Maybe the girls from our sis- 
ter college think that you can't de- 
bate, and that an easy victory is in 
the air. If you are interested, make 

possible for the challenge to be ac- 
cepted by entering the trial debate, 
^hich will be held Jan. 12th. Hand 
v our name to Esther Flickinger, tem- 
porary chairman o fthe group. 



L. V. C. ANNOUNCES 

SUMMER SCHOOL 



The Administration of Lebanon 
Valley College announces that it 
is looking forward to another Sum- 
mer School conducted in Harris- 
burg and Annville. Both sessions 
will begin June 20th and close July 
29th. More detailed information 
will be published later when plans 
are more mature. 



Philos Banquet 
As The Guests 
Of College Chef 

Members of Society Enjoy Very 
Pleasant Evening Given by 
M. C. Favinger 



One of the greatest social events of 
the season took place on Friday even- 
ing, when Chef Favinger was host to 
the Philokosmian Literary Society in 
his large banquet hall at the eastern 
end of Annville. Besides two mem- 
bers of the faculty, fifty Philos at- 
tended the event. The regular week- 
ly literary program preceded the ban- 
quet. 

Chef, who is an honorary member 
of Philo, had been contemplating en- 
tertaining the society for some time, 
but because of a very busy season 
prior to the Christmas holidays, he 
was not able to carry out his plans. 
However, as the Christmas season has 
passed and, consequently, as he had 
no banquet scheduled for Friday even- 
ing, he very kindly invited the mem- 
bers of the society to be his guests. 

(Continued on Page Three) 



Lebanon Valley 
Represented In 
Many Meetings 

Profs. Grimm, Derickson, Shenk 
and Reynolds Attend 
Various Conferences 



Lebanon Valley was well represent- 
ed in meetings of various kinds dur- 
ing the vacation period. The annual 
meeting of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science was 
held in Philadelphia the last wook in 
December, and was attended by Pro- 
fessors Grimm, Reynolds, and Der- 
ickson. In conjunction with this 
meeting, Professor Grimm attended 
sessions of the American Physiologi- 
cal Society, and Professor Derickson 
attended several sessions of the Bot- 
anical Society of America and the 
American Zoologists Society. 

In the same week we were repre- 
sented by Professors Grimm and Rey- 
nolds at the annual meeting of the 
Pennsylvania Teachers Association at 
Harrisburg. The American Histori- 
cal Society met at Rochester, N. Y., 
where we were represented by Pro- 
fessor Shenk. 



"Apple Sauce" To 1928 Quittie 
Feature Tonight Sales Campaign 
In Chautauqua Now In Progress 



Comedy-Drama Promises to Give 
Many Laughs — Closing Num- 
ber Tomorrow Night 



The Swathmore Chautauqua will be 
held in the College Chapel January 
12, 13, and 14th, afternoon and even- 
ing. Fifty citizens of Annville have 
obligated themselves financially to 
guaranteee the Chautauqua for 1927. 
Chauatauqua's have been conducted in 
Annville for more than ten consecu- 
tive years, and have proved a great 
success' both educationally and as fine 
entertainment. 

January the 12th at 3 P. M. the 
Chautauqua will open with the Com- 
mittee in charge. Besides the" Jr. 
Chautauqua activities, a concert will 
be given by the Krantz Family Con- 
cert Co. playing 17 different instru- 
ments. 

The evening program will consist of 
the Krantz Family and a lecture on 
"The Needs of the Hour," by Judge 
George D. Alden, an eminent barrister 
and former Massachusetts jurist, and 
for many years an outstanding figure 
of the American lecture platform. 

On the afternoon of the 2nd day 
a Lecture-Demonstration will be given 
by Mrs. Josephine Dominick, whose 
subject is "Weir Dressed on a Mod- 
erate Income." This lecture consists 
of a study of the fundamentals of 
good taste on a moderate allowance. 

(Continued on Page Two) 



Price to be Four Dollars- 
No Extra Books — 
Act Now 



The 1928 Quittie Staff urges every 
student to buy a record of the school's 
activities during this year. 

As a general rule, college year- 
books have been regarded in the past 
as of interest only to the class pub- 
lishing them. The editions have been 
limited. Usually just enough have 
been printed to supply the members 
of the class. It has been taken for 
granted that others, outsiders, would 
not be interested. But now, college 

(Continued on Page Pour) 



Qualifications 
Required For 
Writers' Club 



Candidates Required to Hand 
Application to Dr. 
Wallace 



Cupid Conquers 
Many Hearts At 
Lebanon Valley 

Again Proves That College Is 
the Beginning of Many 
Romances 



Attention has been called to the 
fact that there is some speculation 
on the campus, concerning qualifica- 
tions necessary for membership in the 
Writers' Club. This organization has 
been in existence for almost a year 
and a half. It hasjoad a rather per- 
ilous career during this short space 
of time. Originally it- was formed 
with the idea of developing literary 
talent among students possessed of 
ability and interest along that line. 
This year several of the first group 
felt that because of other more press- 
ing matters they would no longer be 
able to continue as members of the 
club. Reorganization took place with 
just a handful of folks — folks who 

(Continued on Page Four) 



Our Lebanon Valley Cupid is to be 
congratulated. Christmas has brought 
tidings of his most recent conquests, 
a number of the Alumni and a mem- 
ber of the Junior Class, most of 
whom were honor students in cam- 
pusology while here, including Miss 
Martha Schock, '25; Miss Mary Krei- 
der, '28, and the Messrs. Luther Weik, 
'25; Kenneth Roper, '26, and Allen 
Richards, '26. 

Although the Kreider-Roper mar- 
riage has just recently been an- 
nounced, the ceremony was performed 
on last August 15th, at Hagerstown, 
Md., by Rev. Reider, father of Har- 
old Reider, '29. Mr. and Mrs. Roper 
are now living at Cornwall Heights, 
near Bristol. Mr. Roper has been 
teaching mathematics in the Cornwall 
Heights High School since early last 
Fall. 

Miss Schock and Mr. Weik were 
married on Christmas Day at the 
Schock 'home, in Tremont. The bride 
was attended by a classmate, Miss 
Catherine Nisley, '25, as maid of hon- 
or. The honeymoon began in the 
Penn Harris hotel. The following 
day the wedding party left for a 
week in Washington, D. C., accom- 
panied by Mr. Allen Richards and 
his bride. Mrs. Weik expects to teach 
until June. 



Glee Club Has 
Many Concerts 
To Be Rendered 



Club Will Make Numerous Ap- 
pearances Throughout State 
and in Washington 

As the season is rapidly approach- 
ing when the college Glee Club will 
render its usual concerts, intensive 
practices are being held two nights 
a week in Engle Hall. From the pres- 
ent outlook, there is a very brilliant 
season ahead for the club, which is 
being directed by Prof. George Rog- 
ers, of the voice department of the 
conservatory. 

Up to the present time, nine con- 
certs have been definitely arranged, 
one each in Reading, Harrisburg, Red 
Lion, Lebanon, Dallastown, Hanover, 
and Washington, and two in Balti- 
more. It is quite certain that this 
number will be doubled, for there are 
prospects of engagements in Shamo- 
kin, Lancaster, Freeland, Hazleton, 
Enola, Lykens, Ashland, and other 
towns usually visited by the Club. 
Many towns have written to the busi- 
ness manager requesting him to ar- 
range for an appearance there. One 

(Continued on Page Three) 



Freshmen Hold 
Annual Banuet 
In Capital City 

Ikimolested by Sophs Freshman 
Hold Banquet at H'burg 
Country Club 



The freshman class outwitted the 
Sophomores and held their banquet 
on Monday, January third, at the 
Country Club of Harrisburg. 

Almost every member of the class 
turned out for this affair, which is al- 
ways one of the highlights in the 
Frshman year. The peculiar tradi- 
tion at Lebanon Valley is for the 
Sophomore class to try to break up 
the affair for tha* Freshies, and if not, 
to at least give them a thrill. This 
year the class selected the night af- 
ter vacation and went direct from 
their homes to the banquet entirely 
unmolested by their rivals. The place 
for the banquet to be held was kept 
a secret. Never before was a ban- 
quet staged at the Country Club, but 
this proved an ideal place. The hall 
was very artistically decorated in the 
class colors, and every Frosh reports 
this as the biggest and best banquet 
ever staged by any class. 

After the satisfying of their im- 

(Continucd on Page Four) 



Eurydice Club 
Will Present 
More Concerts 



Faculty Has Given Permission 
to Co-eds to Present Ten 
Concerts 



Of mortals who have visited Leba- 
non Valley College and returned, none 
tells a sweeter story than that about 
Eurydice. She is a beautiful maiden, 
and a most famous musician, for she 
is known throughout the vast domains 
of Annville. Not only her fellow mor- 
tals are attracted to the conserva- 
tory windows and doors by her lyric 
voice, but other wild beasts are soft- 
ened by the heavenly strains. Eury- 
dice has a lover, Orpheus (Miss 
Engle), who wooes her with such en- 
dearing words as "thy beaming eyes," 
"now let's repeat that 'heavenly 
bliss'," "crescendo" and "I want 'thy 
trembling kiss' softer." 

Orpheus wants to marry Eurydice 
and take hed from her parental 
abode (conservatory) out into the 
world, but Father Jupiter and his host 
of gods (Dr. Gossard and the fac- 
ulty) will not permit it. This re- 
fusal was having a bad effect on 
poor Eurydice, for she was becoming 
quite thin (in numbers). But Or- 
pheus, dauntless and bold, repeated 
the request and had Eurydice sing 
her most plaintive and sweet music 
so that the stone hearts of the gods 
might be touched. 

Convinced of her charming power 
of song, Jupiter said that Eurydice 
and Orpheus might journey over hill 
and vale, singing songs of cheer, on 
the condition, however, that they trav- 
el on their lucky days— the fifth 
sixth, and seventh days of the week. 
Now indeed is Eurydice happy and 
sings with renewed vigor and 'with 
such feeling that every soul on the 
campus has felt the charm 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1927 



latieColkjienne 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 
WALTER L. NESS, '27 
Associate Editors 



MYRA O. SHEAFFER, '27 



MARY McLANACHAN, '27 



Conservatory RUTH STRUBHAR, '29 

Athletic ELMER REISER, '28 

Clio ; ALICE KINDT, '28 

Delphian KATHRYN YOUNG '27 

Kalo LAWRENCE DERICKSON, '29 

Philo J. BRUCE BEHNEY, '28 

General EDNA C. GRAHAM, '28 

DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 

BUSINESS STAFF 
Buiness Manager 

' WADE S. MILLER, '27 

Circulation Manager CLARENCE ULRICH, '27 

Associate Business Manager RAYMOND KOCH, '28 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 

Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, ur.der Act of March .3, 1879 



EDITORIALS 



NEW YEAR'S DAY 

Ancient and modern civilized peoples' while differing as to 
the day from which they reckoned the beginning of the civil year, 
have agreed in distinguishing it by special activities. The Romans 
dedicated New Year's Day to Janus (hence the name January), 
who was the god of beginning. Every morning prayer in a Roman 
home was addressed to Janus and especially was he implored 
at the beginning of the New Year. They sacrificed to him and 
exchanged kindly greetings and wishes and sent to their kins- 
folk and friends gifts called "strenae." This custom continued for 
some time until it finally became a duty for everyone to give 
gifts of the best to the rulers. This existed among the Saxons, 
Druids, English — it is said that all of Queen Elizabeth's wardrobe 
and jewelry were supplied by these contributions. Finally it be- 
came merely a means for the royalty to drain wealth from their 
people and the church condemned it. 

But later on, the church took a different stand and they 
made it a religious holiday to commemorate the circumsion of 
Christ. Today we celebrate the New Year by such festivities as 
the "Ringing out of the old year and the ringing in of the New," 
together with the making of many resolutions. Resolutions prob- 
ably originated with the early Christian tradition; that of the 
purification of the body. We throw aside the old and purify our 
bodies by the making of new resolutions, attempting to make 
our 'bodies purer, stronger, and more helpful. 



ARE YOU GETTING WHAT YOU WANT? 

In this day, when efficiency means so much, we do well if we 
stop to consider whether we are working directly toward the goal 
which we have in mind, or whether circumstances which could be 
altered are misleading us. Lebanon Valley College has always 
striven to fit her students for the positions in life which they 
shall choose. For this cause, the college was founded, and it is 
for the college of the present day to uphold this ideal. 

However, when we look around us and see how the proposed 
courses of students are shattered to pieces, we wonder if some 
link in the chain of college requirements could not be 
strengthened. 

A great man may have said that all men are created free and 
equal, but no one dares or ever will dare to say that within each 
human breast there lies talent which is capable of functioning 
equally well in any profession. How many master minds, although 
they exhibit great arts in a few lines, have been considered totally 
ignorant in other respects ! 

At the present time it is almost impossible to enter Lebanon 
Valley College and prepare mainly for one course in life. Those 
whose gifts of art lie in the academic plane are unwisely and in- 
evitably required to sacrifice that gift for at least one year's study 
in science. In this respect, due to the severity of the science 
courses and the long laboratory periods, they are led to devote 
the major amount of their time to that which will be of little 
value to them. Thereby this proves a hindrance, to the develop- 
ment of that talent which they are trying to cultivate. Then 
again, if they are not equally capable in the scientific field as in 
the academic, they are rated low, and in all probability are re- 
quired to repeat the course or to choose another science. 

We are inclined to think that to the wise person this does 
not look quite fair. Surely we are sacrificing that which we have 
and most desire for that which we desire not and have little 
ability to obtain. 

Is there not reason to 'believe that this will lead to failure in 
the lines of all professions ? Wherever this fault may lie, whether 
in the executive power or student body, of the school we do well 
to consider it thoughtfully and in such a manner as to allow each 
student the privilege of developing that talent which the Creator 
has placed within him. 



I College Calendar 

January 13 

6:10 P.M. — Ministerium. 
7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. cabinet 
meeting. 

8:00 P.M. — College Band practice. 
8:00 P.M.— Chautauqua. 

January 14 
7:00 P.M. — Regular Sessions of the 
Literary Societies. 

8:00 P.M.— Chautauqua. 

January 16 
B:45i P.M.— Y. W. Devotional Serv- 
ice. 

January 17 

4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M. — Writers' Club. 
9:00 P.M.— Men's Senate. 

January 18 
4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 
6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer Meet- 
ing. 

January 19 

4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. D. Board Meet- 
ing. 

8:00 P.M.— Muhlenberg vs. Leba- 
non Valley at Allentown. 

January 20 

6:10 P.M.— Ministerium. 

7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
meeting. 

8:00 P.M.— College Band practice. 

8:00 P.M.— Mt. St. Mary's vs. Leba- 
non Valley at Emmittsville. 

January 21 

7 :00 P.M.— Regular Sessions of the 
Litsrary Societies. 

8:00 P.M. — Georgetown vs. Lebanon 
Valley at Washington. 

January 23 

5:45 P.M.— Y. W. Devotional serv- 
ice. 

January 24 

4:00 P.M. — Ministerium. 
7:00 P.M.— Readers' Club. 
9:00 P.M.— Men's Senate. 



Alumni Notes 

Mr. V. Earl Light, '16, an assistant 
in the Department of Zoology, Johns 
Hopkins University, where he is com- 
pleting work for his Doctor of Phil- 
osophy Degree, motored from Balti- 
more to Annville during the .holidays 
and visited friends here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver C. Kuntzle- 
man, '25, of Muir, announce the birth 
of a daughter, Ruth Rene, on Sunday, 
December 19 th. 

Miss L. May Hoerner, '10, profes- 
sor of Home Economics in Otterbein 
College, Westerville, Ohio, spent her 
Chrisitmas vacation with her parents 
at Boiling Springs, visiting friends in 
Harrisburg and vicinity. 

Mr. Carroll Daugherty, '21, is now' 
holding an instructorship at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, where he ex- 
pects to complete the work for his 
Doctor of Philosophy Degree at the 
end of this year. Mr. Daugherty is 
a son of Dr. and Mrs. B. F. Daugh- 
erty, of Lebanon, also alumni of the 
college. 

Dr. H. E. Enders, '97, professor of 
Zoology at Purdue University, in In- 
diana, was one of many Lebanon Val- 
ley Alumni to attend the recent con- 
vention of the American Association 
of Science, in Philadelphia. He stop- 
ped at Derry Church, Hershey, the 
former home of Mrs. Enders, nee 
Miss Moyer. 

Miss Mae Reiter, '26, now teaching 
at Youngsville, spent her Christmas 
vacation in Palmyra, and called upon 
Annville friends. 

Mr. Leroy G. Rittle, '26, is teaching 
mathematics in one of the high schools 
of Altoona. 




"O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see «s/"| 



-BURNS 



This paper needs more humor in it. 
Benson says, "Humor is a kind of 
divine and crowning grace in a char- 
acter, because it means an artistic 
sense of proportion, a true and vital 
tolerance, a power of infinite for- 
giveness." 

If this new column accomplishes a 
better sense of proportion for your 
paper, and affords you the opportun- 
ity to laugh — then it's appearance is 
justified. 

There must be a Santa Claus, 
because : — 

Eleanor Snoke has a nephew. 

Prof. Campbell has a fur coat. 

Blanche Cochran has a boy- 
bob. 

Ton}' Wallace has a brother. 

Lucille Kann has a Hagers- 
town correspondent. 

Prof. Shenk cut his first class 
since the beginning of the year. 

The students had waffles and 
apple dumplings in the dining 
room. 

Mabel Brubaker lost her 
room mate. 

Prof. Bennett has a new pair 
of shoes. 

Wade came back with Jennie. 

Zemski missed breakfast last 
Friday — smashing all records. 

(Notable Chapel address delivered. 
Characterized by its sharp podnts.) 

"Basketball season has begun. 
The team will dine at 11:30 
sharp in the dining room, after 
which they will leave, sharp. 
(Encouraging laugh from audi- 
ence.) Yes, I meant that. It 
will leave sharp. You can all do 
your share. Show your spirit 
by bedng on North Hall steps 
sharp, to give the boys a send 
off. Give them some rousing 
cheers. Show them you are back 
of them. We play Juniata to- 
night, and there is only one 
thing we can do to them. Then 
Friday night we play St. Fran- 
cis and Dr. Wagner (with pro- 
per gestures by the speaker) 
knows what they are. A neat 
little club. But not sharp. Sat- 
urdav we plav State and I imag- 



'APPLE SAUCE" TO 

FEATURE TONIGHT 

IN CHAUTAUQUA 



(Continued from Page One) 

good taste on a moderate allowance. 
The lecture is illustrated by special 
costumes carried by Mrs. Dominick 
and worn- by assistants. This lecture 
will be followed by Junior Chautauqua 
Activities. 

A Comedy-Drama "Applesauce" 
will be given Thursday evening. The 
philosophy of this comedy-drama, in 
the words of the hero, Bill McAllister 
is that "Happiness is like a kiss: the 
only way to get any good out of it is 
to give it to somebody else." It is 
said that they give one hundred and 
thirty laughs in 111 minutes of actual 
play. This play is but two years old. 
It is on Chautauqua circuits by special 
permission. 

On the afternoon of the closing day 
the Junior Chautauqua Pageant will 



ine most of you (motioning to 
each side of the synagogue) 
would be surprised if we won 
from that sharp team. I would 
not be surprised at all. I thank 
you. (low bow.)" 

EDITOR'S NOTE: Both sides of the 
synagogue were sharply alert during 
the entire., address,., laughing., and 
showing their approval at the proper 
time and at the conclusion, they show- 
ed their appreciation further by giv- 
ing a short ray "Sam Clark." It was 
such an ovation that the speaker did 
not "make" History 46 afterward! 

"Lo, such an one was among 
us, and we knew it not!" Psy- 
chology would explain it on the 
basis of inherited tendencies, 
and individual differences. Any 
of us would say that we knew it 
all along, but didn't say any- 
thing. To whom is the refer- 
ence ? 

"To a fair Co-ed, who has the 
grit 

To be married since August, 
And not disclose it!" 

"Congratulations, Mary and 
Roper. Talking about marriage, 
the Romantic Revival was cur- 
rent about this time last week 
under the leadership of Rev. and 
Mrs. Elmer R. Andrews. We 
welcome them with outstretched 
arms for their campus strolls 
make the past deliciously real to 
us. Some plastic co-eds, after 
hearing much good advice on the 
subject, are debating the advis- 
ability — of continuing their col- 
lege careers, now believing mar- 
ried life to be the only life. 

For those of a more prudent 
nature who want some teaching 
experience (for practical pur- 
poses afterward), you are refer- 
red to this type of individual, 
represented by Schack and Weik, 
who chose Christmas time for 
their try-out. We have no doubt 
that theirs is a love set. To two 
such fine, though little people, 
we offer this toast: "May all 
your troubles be little ones." 



be given. After the Junior Chautau- 
qua Pageant, the Clarke Concert Com- 
pany will give a concert. The Clarke 
Company consists of Edward Clarke, 
baritone; Rachel Steinman Clarke, 
violinist, and Frederick Searle, pianist 
and accompanist. Interest is added by 
the introduction of some old time 
tunes given in old fashioned costumes. 

Friday evening the Clarke Concert 
Company will give a second concert, 
which will be followed by an Oriental 
Pageant by Julius Caesar Nayphe. He 
is a young Athenian born of the Gre- 
cian aristocracy and educated in Pale- 
stine and America. It is a brilliant 
spectacle of costly garments and trap- 
pings worn by living models. 

) 



I 

for 
has 
ent 
clu< 
tea 
foo 
A 
and 

Mc< 

We 

Mol 

Cor 
Has 

Kui 

Mai 

Gov 
Bor 
O'N 
Jac 

A 
Geo 



Miss Madie Shoop, '25, and Mrs. 
Elmer Andrews (nee Miss Helen Ha- 
fer '26) were guests in the dormi- 
tories last week. 



r 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1927 



PAGE THREE 



cpORTS EDITOR PICKS 

ALL OPPONENT TEAM 



In selecting an all opponent teeam 
£ r the year 1926 the sports reporter 
has selected two team; an all oppon- 
en t with State and Georgetown in- 
cluded, and one excluding these two 
teams due to their superior class of 
football played throughout the year. 

AH opponent team — including State 
a nd Georgetown. 

ENDS 

jylcGrath Georgetown 

Weaver Albright 

CENTER 

gohoney State 

GUARDS 

Connaughton Georgetown 

Hastings State 

TACKLES 

Kurtz Mt. St. Mary's 

Masko Georgetown 

BACKFIELD 

Gormley Georgetown 

Borelli Muhlenberg 

O'Neill Georgetown 

Jacobs Temple 



All opponent — excluding State and 
Georgetown. 

ENDS . 

Baiz Dickinson 

Weaver Albright 

CENTER 

Gault Villanova 

GUARDS 

Crooks Dickinson 

Harplan Villanova 

TACKLES 

Kurtz v Mt. St. Mary's 

Frock Albright 

BACKFIELD 

Sweeley Dickinson 

Brockderesh Villanova 

Borelli Muhlenberg 

Jacobs Temple 

We could select an all opponent 
team, probably, from State and Geo- 
rgetown alone, thus we have omitted 
these two in our second selection for 
an all opponent team. 

Sports writer. 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



SHEET-IRON QUARTETTE 
ON PROGRAM IN KALO 



Kalo resumed its literary activities 
on Friday evening, January 7, after 
a rest of several weeks. The enter- 
tainment consisted of extemporaneous 
selections of great variety, due to the 
fact that there was not sufficient time 
to prepare a program after the vaca- 
tion. The new president, Gordon 
Starr, presided, and gave a very in- 
spiring address. 

James Hazelton, a new member of 
Kalo, entertained with a very touch- 
ing reading of the Revolutionary 
days, and a quartet composed of 
Aungst, Lewars, Kiehner and Mentzer 
rendered several humorous selections. 
There were several other interesting 
numbers by different members of the 
society. 

A very interesting program has 
been planned for next Friday night. 
It is to be followed by initiation of 
several new men, after which a smok- 
er and social hour will be enjoyed 
by all. 



B. B. SEASON OPENS 

IN FINE STYLE— TWO 
VICTORIES-ONE DEFEAT 



(Continued from Page One) 

Wheeler caused Juniata to obtain an 
additional point and the score stood 
30-28 in the local team's favor. 
Weeler, of Juniata, was the outstand- 
ing star with a total of 17 points. 
Gelbert and Piela starred for the Blue 
and White, Gelbert having 12 points. 
The new men and those of last year's 
team played an exceptionally good 
Same, displaying good team work. 
Line-ups: 

Ju niata Lebanon Valley 

We eler F Gelbert 

Eisenhart F Piela 

Gr <>ve C Wheeler 

J ou glas G Piersol 

T olsinger G Bell 

Biles C 

Beery Q 

Substitutions: Juniata — Biles and 
Beery. Lebanon Valley — Miller, Forn- 
w alt and Shroyer. 

Referee — Geesel, Harrisburg. 



the sensational part of the game. As 
a pivot man he was working in full 
form and style and his successive tip- 
offs at center gave the boys a great 
advantage. The score at the end of 
the first half was 17-0 favor of Leb- 
anon Valley. St. Francis, although a 
very highly rated team offered little 
resistance to prevent the boys from 
victory. Roetzel, opponent guard, 
played a good game. Line up: 

St.. Francis Lebanon Valley 

Holly F Gelbert 

Sapora F Piela 

Shields C Wheeler 

Roetzel G Bell 

Smith G Piersol 

Lynch G *.. Sheager 

Substitutions: Lebanon Valley — 
Miller and Fornwalt. 

Referee — J. Dewey Hogue. 



L. V. C. vs ST. FRANCIS 

Before a capacity audience in the 
*■ M. I. Hall, Altoona, Lebanon Val- 
e y rolled St. Francis for a defeat by 
tll e score of 34-17. This was the sec- 
consecutive win in as many days 
° r Lebanon Valley, having defeated 
piata, the night before, Jan. 6. St. 
r ^ncis has an annual crack team in 
Hetball, but superior passing abil- 
combined with carefully maneuv- 
^ re d teamwork was too much for St. 
rancis. Piela was the high scorer 



star of the game. In the last 



j, w minutes of play he obtained 7 

J**d goals. His exactness in throwing 

n e ball into the basket was the cause 
of 

much interest on the part of the 
Aetata 



Hi 



Gelbert had 9 points to 

credit. "Big Boy" Wheeler offered 



L. V. vs PENN STATE 

After two consecutive wins Leba- 
non Valley tasted the first defeat of 
the year at the hands of Penn State 
Saturday evening by the score of 40- 
32. On several occasions the local 
boys lead State by a few points, but 
due to the strain of the two games, 
the two days previous, the Lebanon 
Valley team was exhausted and bowed 
conquered to their foe after waging a 
bitter battle. Captain Haines, of 
State excelled in his abilities as a 
player, being a good defensive won 
and able to shoot baskets at most any 
angle, long or short. He had to his 
credit eight field goals and five fouls 
tor a total a 21 points. Gelbert with 
12 points was high score for the lo- 
cals. State had no easy time defeat- 
ing the veteran Lebanon Valley team, 
for throughout the game the latter 
was very insistent on victory. The 
score at half was 19-15, favor of State. 
Wheeler and Piersol played a splendid 
defensive game, Wheeler also having 
3 field goals. Line ups: 
State 

F.G. F. 

Homas, F 8 5 

Raepke, F 1 

Page, C 5 

Vonmeda G 1 1 

Baron, G 1 

Lebanon Valley 

F.G. F. 

Gelbert, F 6 

Piela F 2 1 

Wheeler C 3 

Bell G 3 2 

Piersol G 3 

Shroyer for Piela; Piela for Shroy- 
er; Miller for Bell; Shroyer for Gel- 
bert. Referee — Geisel. 



DELPHIAN S INSTALL 

FLORENCE DUNDORE 



On Friday evening, January 7, «in 
Delphian Hall, the "New Year" made 
its debut in a very clever manner, as 
follows: 

I do hereby resolve — 

To Study Kathryn Wheeler 

To Sleep Esther Koons 

To Hike Sue Wishart 

Blanche Cochran 

To Read Winifred Peck 

To Exercise Janet Miller 

At this meeting, the winter term 
officers were installed. They are as 
follows: 

President Florence Dundore 

Vice-President Kathryn Young 

Critic : ....Frances Long 

Rec. Secretary Sarah Lou Rose 

Cor. Secretary Edna Gorski 

Chaplain Viola Wolfe 

Pianist ....Mildred Umholtz 

Warden Blanche Cochran 

Third Term Pres.. Miriam Daugherty 



NEW MEMBERS OF 

PHILO GIVE PROGRAM 



The program for the regular liter- 
ary session of Philo for Friday even- 
ing, January 14, is as follows: 

Devotions Chaplain 

The Origin of Coal Harold Moyer 

The Nicaraguan Crisis Wm. Sauer 

Original Poem Luverne Snavely 

Accordion Solo Harvey Kline 

Annville's Advantages Over New 

York City Dominic Bovino 

Debate: Resolved, That I Am Nearer 
the Ph.D. Degree Than You—Clar- 
ence Hendricks, Rudy Cunjak 
Critic's Report 

All those taking part on the pro- 
gram are new members of the soci- 
ety. It is expected that a large num- 
ber of members will be present to en- 
joy the program. 

The account of the society's activi- 
ties of last Friday evening, which 
included the regular program and a 
banquet tendered the Society by our 
chef, is found in another column. 



PHILOS BANQUET 

AS THE GUESTS 

OF COLLEGE CHEF 

(Continued from Page One) 



The members of the society met 
at his place at 7:15 and rendered a 
short literary program. This consist- 
ed of the following numbers: 

Devotions Chaplain Meyer 

President's Address. .Luke S. Mimura 

Reading Elmer A. Keiser 

Quartette — Russel Oyer, John Rojahn, 
Harold Ryder, Bruce Behney 

Parody John W. Beattie 

Sketch Moser & Co. 

Quartette 

Presentation Harvey Nitrauer 

In his address, President Mimura, 
on behalf of the society, expressed 
the sincere appreciation the society 
holds for the Chef, not only because 
of his generosity in this instance, but 
because of his continued interest in 
the affairs of the society of which 
he is a member. While all the other 
numbers of the program were very 
commendable, the sketch by Moser 
and Company is especially worthy of 
mention. The members of the com- 
pany beside the director and leading 
actor were Arnold Zwally and Luke 
Mimura. Lewis Candano and Paul 
Barnhart acted as stage hands. The 
action took place in the photographic 
studio of Moser, and centered around 
the photographing of the infant 
Mimura. Zwally acted the part of the 
proud mother. The sketch came to 
an abrupt end due to the absent- 
mindedness of the photographer. At 
the conclusion of the program, the 
president called for general remarks, 
and Professors Grimm and Wagner, 
also honorary members of the society, 
responded. Their remarks centered 
around traffic problems, though in a 
different relation than might be sup- 
posed. 

Immediately after the program, the 
Chef proved his ability as host by 
setting forth a banquet fit for a king. 
The menu consisted of rolls, bisquits. 
salmon croquets, chicken salad, waf- 
fles, pickles, coffee, sundaes, choco- 
lates, cigars, and cigarettes. 

After all the members had satisfied 
their appetites, Millard Miller acted 
as toastmaster, and the following- 
members responded with toasts: 
Allen Klinger, Abram Dohner, Elmer 
Keiser, Prof. Wagner, Prof. Grimm, 
and Chef Favinger. Lewis Candano 
also gave an exhibition of the Charles- 
ton, the famous dance originated by 
the Scotch. In his toast, Elmer Keis- 
er read his literary masterpiece, 
"Zanzibar." All speakers concluded 
their remarks with reference to the 



success of the society both as a liter- 
ary and social organization. 

Too much praise and appreciation 
cannot be expressed by the Philos to 
Chef for his hospitality. The ban- 
quet was by far the greatest social 
event in the history of the society. 
Although every member always had 
a warm place in his heart for Chef, 
every one now cannot but agree that 
Chef is one of the best friends the 
society has and as a host he is un- 
excelled for, indeed, "he is a jolly 
good fellow." 



GLEE CLUB HAS 

MANY CONCERTS 

TO BE RENDERED 



of 



(Continued_ from Page One) 

the reasons for the widespread 
popularity of the club is that it al- 
ways appears in the church services 
and renders several selections in 
whatever towns it happens to be over 
the week-ends. This is always high- 
ly appreciated. 

It is still too early to announce the 
concert program. However, it may be 
said, that as far as quality is con- 
cerned, it will surpass that of last 
year, which was regarded as the best 
in years. Although the Club has 
many new members, yet, because of 
the unusual ability showed by them, 
the director and officers are very well 
pleased. 

STORK NEWS 



Dr. and Mrs. Paul A. W. Wallace 
announce the birth of a son, David 
Harold, on Christmas Eve, in Church 
House Hospital, Baltimore, Md. The 
baby is named after Dr. Harold Ben- 
nett, professor of Latin, Greek, and 
Spanish on the Lebanon Valley fac- 
ulty. 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm 



Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 



BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



CHICKEN AND WAFFLE 
DINNERS 

That Cannot be Surpassed 
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H. W. MILLER 



Hardware 
of Quality 



Annville, 



Pa. 



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PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 



Miller 



Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

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We Recommend 

Shaeffer Lifetime 
Fountain Pens 

Absoluetly the Best Pen Made, 
and Guaranteed to Last 
a Lifetime 

HARPEL'S 

757-759 Cumberland St. 
THE GIFT STORE OF LEBANON 



ULRICH'S STUDIO 

820 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 
Studio and Home Portraits 
Films Printed and Developed 
Promptly 



Clothing of Quality 

J. S. RASHORE 

8th & Cumberland Sts. - - Lebanon, Pa. 



We Are There In Men's Wear 

Hub 



713 Cumberland St. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



Photographs of Quality 
BLAZIER & MILLER 
36 N. 8th St. - - Lebanon, Pa. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE OOLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1927 



lltllllllllllhUiiitiiiiniiiiiiHitiiiiMiiim. 



Kampus Kracks 



Who said there was no SantJ 

Claus? 



After the dance, 

They parked 

On the 

Sofa, 

And the 

Girl cried, "Oh! 

Please! Don't! Stop!" 

But it wasn't 

More than 

Ten 

Minutes 
Later that she 
Whispered in Jim 
Keane's ear: 

"Oh! Please don't stopl" 
Which he didn't! 



Lewars: I'll be loving you always. 
Girl Friend: All ways? 
Lewars: Sure! 

G. F.: Gosh, how many holds do you 
know? 



They call him "Artie" because he 
ought to "hoke." 



"Left Tackle:" Do you think I 
ought to "choke". 

Blanche Stager: No! 

"Left Tackle:" What would you 
suggest? 

Blanche: Blasting! 



Prof. Stokes: Think of the progress 
in 1926. The development of train 
service — autos and aeroplanes — law 
and order — why where was the New 
York police force thirty years ago ? 

Peck Piersol: In Ireland. 



Hafer: My uncle's wife's great- 
grandfather was a Minute Man at 
Cambridge. 

Lebo: That's nothing. I've got an 
uncle was a 10 second man at Penn. 



Grimm: What's the difference be- 
tween the North and South poles? 

Leah Harpel: All the difference in 
the world. 



How It Happened 

"Red" Reiser: There's something 
trembling on my lip! 
She: Shave it off! ! ! 



Little Willie Burns 

Sat on a stove 
Little Willie Burns 

Sara Lou Rose 

Sat on it too 
Sara Lou Rose 



Prof. Gingrich (In Court): I plead 
for the dismissal of the defendant, 
your honor. He's deaf. 

Judge: Not granted. He'll have his 
hearing in the morning. 



Nancy: I hear a noise without. 
Ruth: Without what? 
Nancy: Without music. 
Ruth: It must be the Glee Club 
leaving out. 



"That was some belle I was out 
with on New Year's Eve," said Scrunt 
Rider. "She never tolled." 



Min: I've just had an onion sand- 
wich. 

Flo: Don't breathe it to a soul! 



Mary: <Fhat scar on your forehead 
must be very annoying? 
Hertzler: Oh, it's next to nothing. 



Mike: How was the cigar? They 
give away a Victrola for two hundred 
bands like those. 

Derry: If I smoked two hundred of 
those, I wouldn't want a Victrola; I'd 
want a harp. 



1928 QUITTIE 

SALES CAMPAIGN 

NOW IN PROGRESS 



(Continued from Page One) 

year-books are coming more and more, 
to be records of a year's activities, 
as participated in by members of all 
classes on the campus. The 1928 
"Quittie" is sponsored by one class, 
the Juniors, it is true, but it is plan- 
ned with pictures of the faculty, socie- 
ties, and activities of all classes in- 
cluded to be interesting as an all-col- 
lege story to members of all classes, 
and to alumni as well. 

The price of the "Quittie" is $4.00. 
In previous years the largest number 
of books sold by any class was 280, 
that by the present Senior Class. This 
income amounted to almost $1200. 
The book complete costs between 
$2000 and $2500 leaving almost $1500 
to be raised through other channels. 
The proceeds of the Junior Class play 
are turned over to the "Quittie" staff, 
but this is never much more than 
$100. Through advertising $300 or 
$400 more are raised with $1000 still 
to be accounted for. This is appor- 
tioned among the members of the Ju- 
nior Class and each one is assessed 
$10 or $15 exclusive of their class 
dues. All this is done in order that 
the best book possible can be given to 
the students, who pay but $4 for 
something that is really priceless. 
Every student with the right L. V. 
spirit will purchase a 1928 "Quittie," 
and every loyal student is expected to 
own one. The value of the "Quittie" 
far exceeds the price set. The en- 
graving contract calls for the finest 
engravings that money can buy, while 
the printer will use the highest qual- 
ity of paper and other materials. The 
book, which will contain hundreds of 
photos and many new features, is ar- 
tistically planned from every angle. 



FRESHMEN HOLD 

ANNUAL BANQUET 

IN CAPITAL CITY 



(Continued from Page One) 

mense appetites a very interesting 
program was rendered, which was as 
follows: MFresh Resolutions," by Ed- 
gar Shoryer, class president; Vocal 
Solo, by Leah Miller; Reading, by 
Alcesta Slichter; Piano Solo, by Hilda 
Hess; Reading, by John Hafer; Ad- 
dress: "Fresh Freshies," by Dr. C. H. 
Garwood, superintendent of public 
schools of Harrisburg. It was through 
Dr. Garwood that the class was able 
to secure the Country Club for theii 
banquet. The chaperones were Dr. 
and Mrs. Gossard, Dr. and Mrs. Gar- 
wood, and Dr. Wagner, 
served as toastmaster. The banquet 
proved to be an incentive for the 
frosh to flunk their subjects, that 
they may be eligible for the freshman 
banquet next year. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 



Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



VARSITY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE, SEASON 1927 

January 6 — Juniata 28-30 Huntingdon 

January 7 — St. Francis 17-34 Altoona 

January 8— Penn State 40-32 State College 

January 11 — Loyola Baltimore, Md. 

January 12 — Western Maryland Westminster, Md. 

January 19 — Muhlenberg Allentown 

January 20 — Mt. St. Mary's Emmittsburg, Md. 

January 21 — Georgetown Washington, D. C. 

January 29 — Schuylkill Lebanon 

February 12 — Albright Lebanon 

February 15 — Ursinus Collegeville 

February 16 — Schuylkill , Reading 

February 21 — Gettysburg Gettysburg 

February 23 — Franklin and Marshall Lebanon 

February 28 — Franklin and Marshall Lancaster 

March 2 — Lafayette Easton 

March 4— Albright Lebanon 



CO-ED'S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE, SEASON 1927 

January 14 — Schuylkill College Annville 

January 22 — AVestern Maryland Westminster 

January 29 — Western Maryland Lebanon 

February 5— Penn Hall Chambersburg 

February 11— Albright Lebanon 

February 16 — Schuylkill Reading 

February 19 — Gettysburg Annville 

February 26— Gettysburg Gettysburg 

March 4-Albright Lebanon 

March 12— Millersville State Normal School Millersville 



Fine 



Home-made Candies 



LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 

ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 



A fine place to treat your friend 



TSCHUDY'S 
CONFECTIONERY 

One-half square from P. O. Bldg. 

West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



NO 



>♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»»♦*♦♦»♦»♦»♦♦♦♦ ♦ #< 

QUALIFICATIONS 

REQUIRED FOR 

WRITER'S CLUB 



(Continued from Page One) 

are very much concerned that the 
club should be a vital factor in camp- 
us life. 

A candidate for membership in the 
organization simply must be one who 
is ready to work and willing to 
learn. If you have literary ability 
together with the above mentioned 
qualities, put in your application for 
membership at once. This takes the 
form of a manuscript of your own 
composition, which should be handed 
to Dr. Wallace. 





For QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORTS' 
Department Store 

and 

Quality Grocery 

MAIN STREET, - ANNVILLE, PA. 

Student's Discount 



icomfptt 



from your old 
shoes -We repair 
them- lots of wear 



ANNILLE SHOE REPAIR CO. 



♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

HOFFMAN STEAM PRESSING 
KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 




DROPS 
USED 



DR. HARRIS GRUMAN 
Eyesight Specialist — Optometrist 
tO N. Eighth St., - Lebanon, Pa. 
GLASSES REPAIRED 

THE PENN WAY** 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH. Prop. 

Annville, Pa. 



Good Things to Eat 



ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 



Annville 



Pa. 



Bowling & Billiards 



DR. L. N. HEILMAN 



FOR QUALITY 

BAKED PRODUCTS 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 



Main Street 



Annville, 



Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY & CO. 
Umbrellas, Luggage and Sporting Goods 



Opposite Post Office 



UP-TO-DATE DENTAL OFFICE 

Above Batdorf's Dept. Store 
West Main Street - - ANNVILLE 

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For First Class Dinners or Luncheons— Try 
THE PENNWAY 

Opposite P. O. 

A Full Line of Fresh Pastry Daily 
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BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 

College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Tennis 
and Baseball Supplies .:. .:. .:. .: 



Lebanon, Pa. 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



in a 
Loy 

dist; 
star 
abl e 
13 P 

a m 

^or 

half 

the 

°Vei 



*nd 



43 EAST MAIN STREET 



ANNVILLE. P 4 



E 



START THE SECOND 



SEMESTER RIGHT 




ie Colktjiennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



PREPARE FOR THOSE 
EXAMS— NO FLUNKS 



VOLUME II 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 1927 



NUMBER 7 



MUHLENBERG AND WESTERN MARYLAND 

VICTIMS OF BLUE AND WHITE GAGERS 



Mylinmen Defeat Ancient Rivals at Allentown with Snappy 
Form After Losing One to Loyola and 
Defeating Western Maryland 



GEORGETOWN AND MT. ST. MARY'S ARE VICTORS 



MUHLENBERG GAME 

VERY THRILLING 



With spectacular playing and a 
real comeback Lebanon Valley de- 
feated Muhlenberg 24-13, at Allen- 
town January 19. Muhlenberg at the 
end of the first half lead the score 
10-5. In the second half Lebanon 
Valley displayed real form and made 
19 points to Muhlenberg's 3. The of- 
fensive attack of the home team was 
too much for the fast team of Muh- 
lenberg. Gelbert and Piela with 14 
and 6 points respectively were alert 
on the scoring line, while Wheeler 
who replaced Miller at center, tapped 
the ball splendidly into the hands of 
his teammates. Muhlenberg's low 
score in the second half was due to 
the superb guarding of Bell and Pier- 
sol. Caldren and Sholeums. of Muh- 
lenberg displayed fine teamwork. 

WESTERN MARYLAND GAME 
Western Maryland went down to 
defeat at the hands of Lebanon Val- 
ley, January 12, at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, by the score of 38-22. Western 
Maryland has a very unique team 
this year and showed good form, but 
superb team work on the part of 
Lebanon Valley gave the latter the 
long end of the scoring card. Piela 
and Gelbert made some remarkable 
8hots and contributed the majority of 
points for the local team's victory, 
Piela turning in a score of 18 points 
and Gelbert 14. The good defensive 
Work of the guards, Piersol and Bell 
caused Western Maryland to put up 
a hard struggle for all points scored. 
Wheeler as pivot man had the jumo- 
tag edge on his opponent. Broil, 
Captain of Western Maryland, play- 
ed remarkable both in the offensive 
a nd defensive side. Line-up: 

LOYOLA GAME 
In a hard fought game at Balti- 
more, Tuesday, January 11th, Leba- 
non Valley tasted defeat at the hand^ 
°f Loyola College, by the score of 
26-14. This was but the second de- 
feat of the year and Lebanon Valley 
Peking the necessary floor work 
a Bainst this fast combination wae 
^able to gain to any advantage. The 
Wola team on a whole were good 
^fcrksmen, making baskets from any 
^stance or angle of the floor. Dudly, 
^ a i" guard of Loyola, played remark- 
a kle basketball, having to his credit 
^ points. The points scored by Leba- 
non Valley were equally distributed 
*ttiong the players, no one obtainin ? r 
w>*e than two points. In the second 
ft *lf Lebanon staged a comeback but 
]*• early lead of Loyola could not be 
Ve rcome. Line-up: 

MT. SAINT MARY'S AND 
GEORGETOWN GAMES 
Lebanon Valley journeyed tu 
I ^niitsburg and Washington Jon. 20 
* n d 21 and encountered the strong 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 3) 



DR. GOSSARD ABLE 

TO BE ABOUT AGAIN 

Dr. G. D. Gossard, president of 
Lebanon Valley College, who for 
the past week, was confined to his 
home with an attack of la grippe 
is again able to be about to attend 
his duties as president. This is of 
great importance to the students 
for he has been missed very much 
and we trust that he will have a 
speedy recovery and soon be able 
to be about as before. 



ATHLETIC CLUB 
GIVES REGULAR 
WEEKLY PROGRAM 

New Event is Sponsored by the 
Members of the Varsity 
"L" Club Weekly 

That the "L" Club is doing its part 
to stimulate athletics is shown by 
the programs which it is sponsoring 
in the college gymnasium every 
Wednesday night. On January 12 
the main feature of the evening was 
a basketball game between the team 
of Brutus Wiest and a quintet cap- 
tained by Mike Toronto. The Wiest 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 



Y.M.CA. AND Y.W.C A. 

IN JOINT-SESSION 



Louise Rounds of Student 
Volunteer Association 
Gives Address 



The regular joint-session of the Y. 
W. C. A. and the Y. M. C. A. was 
held Sunday evening, Jan. 16, in En- 
gle Hall. The meeting was in charge 
of Kenneth Reissinger with Neldn 
Spatz as soloist. 

Miss Louise Rounds, a graduate of 
the University of Texas, and travel- 
ling in the interest of the student 
Volunteer Association, was the speak- 
er for the evening. Miss Rounds at- 
tended the Milwaukee Conference 
and brought to us many good 
thoughts that she had gathered 
while there. Especially did she em- 
phasize the importance of being a 
world Christian if one would be a 
Christian at all. She held many in- 
terviews with those who desired to 
receive new information and new 
light on the problems that Christian 
Volunteers must meet every day. The 
two days of her stay on the campus 
were certainly most profitable and 
helpful. 

The attendance at the joint-session 
was a source of gratfication to the 
officers of the two associations. In- 
terest seems to be growing with re- 
gard to devotional life. 



ALFRED KERSHEY 
NEW PRESIDENT 
OF SENIOR GLASS 

Piersol Elected by Juniors, anc 
Freshmen Elect William 
Lehman 



With the beginning of a new se- 
mester close at hand, many of the 
class organizations on the campus 
have taken on the task of electing 
office) s for the coming semester. At 
about the same time there was an 
inauguration at Harrisburg, com- 
memorating the installation of our 
next governor. But those on the 
campus we deem equally important 
to us in our little college common- 
wealth. 

After the proper amount of 
"electioneering," stump speaking, 
and small scale campaigning, the 
several classes entrusted their re- 
sponsibility to the following: 

In the Senior Class of 1927, Alfred 
N. Hershey, son of Rev. and Mrs. 1. 
Moyer Hershey, of Philadelphia, has 
been elected to the position of pres- 
ident. Mr. Hershey is well known 
about the school and has taken part 
in many of its activities. Miss Kath- 
ryn Young was elected to the chair 
of vice-president and Miriam Daugh- 
erty as secretary. Both of these la- 
dies are very active members of the 
Senior Class. 

In the Junior Class of 1928, Paul 
Piersol, of Coatesville, Pa., was elect- 
ed as president. Mr. Piersol is well 
known in and about the school as an 
athlete, and very active in that class. 
Indications are that he will make one 
of the best presidents in the history 
of that class. Mabel Hafer was elect- 
ed as vice-president, with Mary 
Geyer as secretary. 

In the Sophomore Class of 192? 
Palmer Poff, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Poff of Dallastown was elected. 
Other elections of this class have not 
been made public. 

The Freshman Class of 1930 elect- 
ed is their president William Leh- 
man, son of Rev. and Mrs. Lehman, 
of Harrisburg. Other elections were: 
Vice-president, Ruth Cooper, Record- 
ing Secretary, Hilda Hess; Financial 
Secretary, Alfred Shenk. 



GO-ED QUINTET 
OPENS SEASON 
WITH VICTORY 

Play Very Spectacular Game 
Before Record Crowd in 
Alumni Gvm 

The co-ed's basketball season began 
with a bang! On Friday evening. 
January 14, in the Alumni gymna- 
sium, the co-eds carried off the spoil- 
from the Schuylkill College sextette 
to the tune of 34-22. The Lebanon 
Valley girls outplayed their oppo- 
nents throughout the battle, and 
were ably led by Captain Rabensttine 
who scored nineteen points of the 
final score. At the end of the first 
half, the score stood 12-8 in favor of 
Lebanon Valley. Much pep and en- 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 2) 



METROPOLITAN 
SINGERS WILL 
GIVE CONCERT 

Star Course Presents Nine 
Thorough Musicians As 
Third Attraction 



Ellsworth Gilbert and His Metro- 
politan Singers will give a concert in 
Engle Hall on Monday, February V, 
at 8 o'clock. This concert is the 
third number on the Star Course pro- 
gram, sponsored by the Y. W. and 
Y. M. C. A. 

Nine thorough musicians make up 
the personnel of the Metropolitan 
Singers. The vocal ensemble is de- 
lightfully augmented by the instru- 
mental support of violin, cello, piano, 
and reed organ. 

Excerpts from grand and light 
opera, including oustanding favorites 
from such modern operas as "The 
Student Prince" and "Rose Marie'' 
will comprise in large measure the 
Metropolitan program. Another im- 
portant feature, however, will be a 
group of numbers in costumes rem- 
iniscent of the former Cathedral 
Choir, of which Mr. Gilbert was the 
organizer and conductor. 

Encores, liberally interspersed, 
will include popular vocal and in- 
strumental numbers in symphonized 
form. The modern orchestra of Paul 
Whiteman type has made classics oul 
of popular numbers. A similar policy 
will be followed by Mr. Gilbert, us- 
ing the vocal-instrumental combina- 
tion effectively in his extra selections 

While the Metropolitan program 
will be primarily vocal, and no thor- 
ough accord with Mr. Gilbert's high 
ideals of song literature, it is also 
provided that the company instru- 
mentalists shall not only assist in the 
ensembles, but also shall offer some 
of the better classics. 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 2) 



SENIOR GIRLS GIVE 

BOYS AFTERNOON TEA 



The Senior girls entertained the 
Senior boys at a party Tuesday after- 
noon in North Hall. Madeline Mark, 
representing the class, made a de- 
lightful hostess and helped to create 
a lovely atmosphere. The girls gave 
a short program, which consisted of 
a reading, "Si and I'' by Mary 
McLanachan; a piano solo, Sir Ed- 
ward Baxter Perry's "Summer Rev- 
eie" by Blanche Stager; and the class 
prophecy given by Myra Sheaffer and 
Florence Dundore. Every part on 
the program was well given and well 
received. After hearing Mary, we 
know who happens to be her "steady 
beau." Music does charm as was d. ■ 
tested by Blanche's selection which 
was such a delightful and appropriate 
interpretation. Every Seniors future 
was interestingly told and led all to 
wonder just what the future held for 
them. The girls then served deli- 
cious refreshments which was follow- 
ed by a lovely social hour. All seem- 
ed to have such a good time that 
similar events are being planned for 
the future. This was a new venture 
and proved a very successful one. 



MUSIC STUDENTS 
ENTERTAIN WITH 
SELECT RECITAL 

Conservatory Students Give 
Second Recital of 
the Season 

The second recital of the season, 
given by the pupils of the Conserva- 
tory of Music, was presented in En- 
gle Hall, Tuesday, January 18, before 
a large audience of students and 
friends of the college. Many pupils 
who did not appear on the opening 
program made their appearance on 
Tuesday evening. The program was 
presented in a very pleasing manner 
and the efforts of the students were 
appreciated by all. 

The program was rendered as fol- 
lows: "Butterfly," by Merkel, Gladys 
Wagner; "Frolic," by Friml, Mary 
Grace Mills; "Sailing" and "A Story," 
by Bostelmann, June Gingrich: 
"Marche Grotesque," by Sinding. 
Olive Weigel; "Mammy's Sleepy Time 
Song," by Strickland, Josephine 
Yake; Cathedral Prelude, by Plag, 
Christine Evans; "The Lord is My 
Strength," by Wooler, Edith Brandt: 
"Pas des Amphores," by Chanimade, 
Alice Woy; "Andante Cantabile," bv 
Tchaikowsky, Benita Strebig; "The 
Beaming Eyes," by MacDowell, and 
"Rose in the Bud," by Forster, Leah 
Harpel; "Serenade," by Pierne, and 
"The Chase" by Rheinberger, Mary 
Grubb; Vision,'' by Rheinberger, 
Hilda Hess; "Ave Maria," "Hedge 
Rose," and "Hark! Hark the Lark - ' 
by Schubert, Benetta Burrier; and 
and Fantasia in D minor, by Mozart, 
Violet Feree. 



SOCIAL OPINION 
SURVEY RESULTS 
OF UPPERCLASSES 

Recent Survey Taken by Educa- 
tion Department Yields 
Valuable Information 

Mr. E. E. Cortright, Assistant Pro- 
fessor in the School of Education, 
New York University, is conducting 
a Social Opinion Survey for the pur- 
pose of getting the reactions of Col- 
lege students from a large percent of 
the Colleges and Universities in the 
United States. Working in conjunc- 
tion with the Department of Educa- 
tion in the various Colleges and Uni- 
versities, he sent a number of these 
questionairres to the Department of 
Education at Lebanon Valley College, 
requesting that they be distribute! 
among the Seniors and Juniors, the'r 
reactions tabulated, and the results 
returned to him. Following is the 
questionairre filled out by our stu- 
dents, and the results obtained. 

SOCIAL OPINION SURVEY 

Name 

School 

Direction:— Underscore Yes or No 
after each question, as expressing 
your attitude. 

1. Should the 18th amendment be 
rigidly enforced? YES NO 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 3) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIKNNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 1927 




ieCalkjiewre 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



College Calendar 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 
WALTER L. NES9, '27 
Associate Editors 

MYRA 0. SHEAFFER, '27 MARY McLANACHAN, '27 

Conservatory RUTH STRUBHAR, '21) 

AthWics ELMER REISER, '2b 

Clio - - - ALICE KINDT, '28 

Delphian"^.":.""-" KATHRYN YOUNG, '27 

Kalo _ __ __ LAWRENCE DERICKSON, '20 

Philo 7 J. BRUCE BEHNEY, '28 

General - _ EDNA C - GRAHAM, '28 

DARKES ALBRIGHT ,'2S 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WADE S. MILLER, '27 

Circulation Manager CLARENCE ULRICH, '27 

Associate Business Manager RAYMOND KOCH, '28 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



6:10 P.M. 
7:00 P.M. 
Meeting. 
8:00 P.M. 



January 27 

-Ministerium. 
-Y. W. C. A. 



Cabinet 



EDITORIALS 



I 



College Band practise. 
January 28 
7:00 P.M. — Regular sessions of the 
Literary Societies. 

January 29 
7:00 P.M. — Western Maryland Girls 
vs. Lebanon Valley College Girls at 
Lebanon. 

8:00 P.M.— Schuylkill Boys vs. 
Lebanon Valley Boys at Lebanon. 
January 30 
5:45 P.M. — Y. W. Devotional Serv- 
ce. 

January 31 

Semester examinations begin. 
4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M. — Writers' Club. 
9:00 P.M.— Men's Senate. 

February 1 
4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

6:40 P.M.— Student Prayer Meet- 
ing. 

February 2 
4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board Meet- 
ing. 

6:15 P.M.- 




"0 wad some Pow'r the giftie &e us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



—BURNS 



ARE YOU GETTING ENOUGH SCIENCE? 

The following- is a letter received by the editor, commenting 
upon a recent editorial appearing in this paper. The editor 
wishes to inform the readers that he is not the author of the 
article but welcomes any comment concerning any editorials 
appearing in this column. 
To the Editor of La Vie Collegienne: — 

In an editorial in your issue of January 13th entitled "Are You Getting 
What You Want?'' the writer in no uncertain terms regrets that all students 
during their four years of college study are required to take one course in 
science, and that the taking of this dreaded course makes unattainable "the 
goal we have in mind" that "circumstances which could be altered are mis- 
leading us" — that "to the wise person this does not look quite fair" and note 
should be made "how the proposed courses of students are shattered to 
pieces." We must confess that we were much wrought up over this sad 
state of affairs especially after learning that this "will lead to failure in the 
lines of all professions." 

We looked in vain through the article for a line of redeeming humor 
and are finally led to ask if this is representative of the 1927 student. 
In this twentieth century with its inheritance of knowledge accumulatet 
by thousands of men and women whose memory is cherished as the founders 
of our civilization, many of whom sacrificed liberty and life itself that 
truth might be established, can anyone refer to this wealth of knowledge 
and truth "that which we desire not?" 

What thoughts arise in the mind of one who does not want to know 
ANY science if he contemplates just a little — the X-ray, electrons, chromo- 
somes, cosmic rays, the radio, color photography, insulin, novocaine, radium, 
the dynamo, the aeroplane? Is he not at all interested in a balanced diet, 
vitamins, heredity, or that men have deliberately given their lives that we 
might have cures for leprosy and cancer? Could such a person acknow- 
ledge the possession of a college diploma and not blush when asked for an 
opinion on evolution, the origin of coal, the causes of eclipses? Would he 
invest money in a company that proposes to build automobiles using water 
only as fuel? 

This editorial writer states that some master minds are ignorant in 
some respects. We would like to know of just one master mind 
WANTED to be ignorant of natural science. What poet would long interest 
us if he boasted such ignorance? The Barefoot Boy and Snow Bound show 
an unusually close acquaintance with nature yet Longfellow and Whittier 
are by no means classed as scientific men. What preacher can draw and 
hold audiences if he professes ignorance of God's handiwork? 

Let a student set out to become a master mind! Can he select a field 
of activity (if a master mind could be developed by such choosing) in 
which knowledge of material things is inconsequential? Let the field be 
abstract mathematics — empty space — lines, .points, circles — the circle and 
eclipse are glorified in the movement of planets, suns, comets, electrons. 
Let the field be philosophy and the student meets the earlier philosopher 
who ignored direct observation and experiment making ludicrous con- 
jecture" to the causes of natural phenomena, and creating gods who 
each day brought up the rising sun and managed the winds and lightning. 

Let the master mind's field be economics and social science. Our 
twentieth century civilization produces perplexing problems over night. 
An invention results in transferring the indigo industry from the fields of 
India to German chemical factories — the development of a two hundred 
million dollar rayon industry at the expense of the silk industry — A radio 

corporation springs up and a phonograph company stops paying dividents 

A new rubber plantation of giant proportions call for natives enough to 
people a state. 

Or, let our master mind be a painter. He will do well to know a little 
about paints, color interference, and light. And painters usually represent 
material things. If they always had known a little science, they never 
would have painted wings on angels. If Coleridge had known just a little 
astronomy he would not in The Ancient Mariner have described a star 
between the two horns of the moon — a humorous impossibility. 

Ingorance in any field in not a disgrace, but a desire not to know should 
not be heralded in editorials. It creates only pity. 

—ANDREW BENDER 



-L. Club Entertainment. 
February 3 
-Ministerium. 
-Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 



6:1") P.M. 
7:00 P.M. 
Meeting. 

8:00 P.M. — College Band practise. 

February 4 
Semester examinations end. 
7:00 P M. — Regular Sessions of the 
Literary Societies. 

February 5 
12 Noon — First Semester ends. 
8:00 P.M.— Penn Hall vs. Lebanon 
Valley at Chambersburg. 

February 6 
5:45 P.M.— Y. W. Devotional Serv- 
ice. 

February 7 

9:00 A.M. — Second Semester begins. 
:4:00 P.M. — Student Volunteer. 

7:00 P.M.— Readers' Club. 

8:00 P.M.— Star Course— Metropoli- 
tan Singers. 

9:00 P.M.— Men's Senate. 

February 8 

4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer 
ing. 

February 9 
4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. 
Meeting. 



Meet- 



Board 



METROPOLITAN SINGERS 
WILL GIVE CONCERT 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 
Mr. Gilbert as basso has an impor- 
tant part in the company's success. 
His associates are: Thelma Marty 
Gilbert, lyric soprano; Wilma Boni- 
field, dramatic soprano; Joseph 
Jovak, contralto; Leroy Mace, tenor; 
Harry Stockwell, baritone; Beulah 
Marty, one of America's most bril- 
liant young violinists; Delsohn Con- 
way, cellist, and Leith Stevens, pian- 
ist and accompanist. 

The Star Course Committee offers 
this as the finest attraction in many 
years. Secured only through 
friend of the college. 



CO-ED OUINTET 

OPENS SEASON 

WITH VICTORY 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 
thusiasm was shown in the cheering 
of the many spectators. 
Line-up: 

Lebanon Valley Schuylkill 

Rabenstine F. McFetridg^ 

Lane F. LeVan 

T. Miller C. Ingle 

J. Miller S. C. LeVan 

Fencil G. Miller 

Cochran G. Baeter 

Substitutions: Schuylkill — Dame- 
rich, Ingle, Pieffer; Lebanon Valley- - 
Meyer, Mark, Fencil. Referee — 
Mayer, Harrisburg. Scorer — Metoxin. 
Timer — Calabrese. 



A PROPHECY 

"Good things are better when 
they are shared." At the Senior 
tea last week, two members of 
the class assumed that most re- 
sponsible task of prophecy ing 
their classmates future, and 
their prophecies sounded so 
plausible (?) that these produc- 
tions were considered worthy of 
publication. 

The first young- lady was in- 
troduced as Miss Lucile Fox. 
With this brief but meaningful 
introduction she proceeded in 
the following words: "As you 
all know, I am a student at Leb- 
anon Valley College. I came 
here in 1947 as a Freshman and 
have now attained the dignity 
of a Senior. I might mention 
this, too, that my parents are 
both graduates of Lebanon Val- 
ley. This sounds interesting, 
doesn't it? They both came to 
L. V. C. in 1923 and a beautiful 
romance was the result, fol- 
lowed by their marriage a few 
years after graduation. My fa- 
ther, Harold Fox, was the cap- 
tain of one of the best foot ball 
teams L. V- ever produced and 
my mother was also an athlete 
starring in basket ball. I might 
mention that my mother was 
known as "Mad" during her col- 
lege days. 

But I've told you sufficient of 
my history to show you how 
closely connected I am with 
this college. And here I am 
studying so diligently under 
Prof- Roy Mouer. Why, he is 
the sole cause of my being here 
this afternoon. He has request- 
ed me and I heartily accepted 
(me) to make a report on all 
the graduates of L. V. who 
have their names in the Who's 
Who- And I've spent hours in 
the library — by the way that re- 
minds me that my parents said 
it is the same library they used 
when they were at school. But 
Lebanon Valley must have 
been an odd looking place at 
that time! They had no smok- 
ing parlors for women, no 
swimming pool, not ever a de- 
cent gym, but that which su- 
nn sod me most of all was the 
fact that they had no mena- 
gerie in which to keep their be- 
loved pets — in fact they say 
they couldn't even have any in 
the dormitories. Why I just 
couldn't exist without Grant — 
my pet monkey. But here I am 
again off my subject and I'm 
here to give a report. 

The first L. V. graduate 1 no- 
ticed in the Who's Who was the 
great Dr. of Campusology who 
is world famous. I was sur- 
prised to find hirri with the 
same Alma Mater I'm hoping to 
have, but now that I think- 
back- I recall hearing my moth- 
er sav that L. V. was noted for 



its campusology. Why I am 
even studying one of bis book's 
at the present time, Dr. James 
Starr's Methods of Campusol- 
ogy. 

The president of our own Col- 
lege, Dr. Todd Herr was a grad- 
uate of L. V., but he was given 
a place in the Who's Who for 
having given $175,000 for the 
establishment of 50 parlors in 
which the coeds may entertain 
— long live our Pres. Herr. 

The Dr. Luke Shigeyuki Mi- 
mura, a graduate of the Class 
of '27 is noted for his great in- 
vention of the formula by 
which Japanese may grow tall. 

Next I discovered the most 
unusual thing — a person by the 
name of Jennie Shoop at one 
time discovered a means of 
crossing the vast ocean by wad 
ing and for some time was the 
famous teacher of this unusual 
art. But a disastrous event hap 
pened (perhaps not unhappily). 
While teaching one day she 
waded higher than her neck 
and now she no longer teaches. 

Robert Knouff has become 
famous not only as an explorer 
but as a salesman, for he has 
became quite wealthy selling 
refrigerators to Eskimos. 

Kathryn Davis is noted for 
her deanship of women at Uni- 
versity of Penna., where her 
strict discipline is noteworthy 

The next name I found in the 
Who's Who was Dr. Samuel 
Clark, the great, doctor— 1 
might mention that he 'is still 
interested in his Alma Mater 
for only a few days ago he de- 
livered a sharp address in onr 
chapel which he so thoughtless- 
ly termed a synagogue. 

Emerson Metoxin, a remnant 
of the greatest people that ever 
inhabited America, has inherit- 
ed the title of Chief and wa c > 
the leader of the recent Battle 
of the Tomahawks. 

Almost at the end of the book 
I discovered Dr. Lucile Meek- 
Kan n, the great surgeon who 
along with the aid of the bril- 
liant Mr. Sprecher, has perfect- 
ed the Kann operation which 
removes the cobwebs from the 
brain. 

The last personage I saw w# 
Madame Florence Dundore, tK 
great specialist and captivating 
lecturer— who happens to b p 
here in person today and h aS 
kindly consented to give ^ 
such message as is on her heart 

You notice by the last word?, 
that a second prophetess 
to appear "on the scene" 
due to lack of space, her & 
vealments must remain conceal- 
ed to you for this time. P eC 
haps they shall appear lat#j 
Why not consult these two cry?' 
tal gazers as to your future? 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 1927 



PAGE THREE 



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SOCIAL OPINION 

SURVEY RESULTS 

OF UPPERCLASSES 
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 
2. Should the 18th amendment he 
abolished? YES NO 

; 3. Should the United States join the 
World Court? YES NO 

4. Should the officers in a demo- 
cratic government be selected through 
partizan politics? (As democrats or 
republicans, etc.) YES NO 

5. Should the United States join 
the League of Nations? YES NO 

6. Should there be a legalized cen- 
sorship of the movies? YES NO 

7. Do you believe that in politics 
"To the victor belong the spoils?" 
(Turning out of office efficient work- 
ers of a different political faith.) 

YES NO 

8. Should the death penalty be 
abolished? YES NO 

II Welfare 

9. Can poverty be abolished? 

YES NO 

10. Does organized charity tend to- 
ward pauperization? YES NO 

11. Should a democratic state pro- 
vide for old age pensions, compulsory 
insurance and disability allowances? 

YES NO 

' 12. Should eugenics be adopted as 
a principle by our states? YES NO 

13. Should all welfare and relief 
work be done only by government 
agencies? YES NO 

14. Should a uniform national Child 
Labor Law be passed? YES NO 

III Religion 

15. Can the individual conscience 
be educated? YES NO 

16. Should all children receive a 
religious education? YES NO 

17. Should religion be taught in the 
public shools? YES NO 

18. Do you believe that the ritual 
in churches contributes to devotion? 

YES NO 

19. Should subscribing to a creed be 
required for church membership? 

YES NO 

IV Educational 

20. Should immigrants who have 
been here 5 years and have not 
learned to read English, be deported? 

YES NO 

' 21. Are there dangers in the state 
Control of education? YES NO 
22 Should birth control knowledge 
legalized? (Illinois office gave ad- 
vice to 500 women, including all 
nationalities and religions in 9 mo.) 

YES NO 

V Morality 

23. Is morality a "matter of Geog- 

YES NO 

24. Should women smoke? YES NO 

25. Should a double standard of 
sex morality exist for men and wo- 
men? YES NO 

26. Is honesty a relative term? 

YES NO 

VI Social 

27. Should divorce be permitted? 

YES NO 

28. Should fashion or convention 
in dress be followed by all? YES NO 

29. Should the drama and theatre 
in general be censored? YES NO 

30. Should the future be safeguard- 
ed biologically through sterilization 
of the physically and mentally unfit? 

YES NO 

31. Should divorced persons be 
allowed to remary? YES NO 

VII Economic 
32. Should the government take over 
a nd administer the coal mines? 

YES NO 

33. Should the workers in all in- 
dustry have a share in the manage- 
ment? YES NO 

34. Should strikes in organized in- 
dustry be prohibited? YES NO 

35. Should organized labor maintain 
a nd administer labor banks and 
schools? YES NO 

36. Should all tax-free securities be 
Prohibited? YES NO 

The question airre revealed that 
Lebanon Valley College is a com- 
paratively conservative school. This 
is based on the reaction of 107 stu- 




KALOZETEAN GIVES 

SMOKER TO NEW MEN 



Kalo is starting off a big year. This 
was shown by the literary sessions of 
the last two weeks. The meeting was 
held on Thursday, January 13, in or- 
der that all members could go to the 
girls' basketball game on Friday night 
When the president, Starr, called he 
meeting to order evry chair was 
occupied and several members were 
standing along the sides. The pro- 
gram was of a musical nature, dis 
playing the talent of many new 
members, 

A quartet composed of Brubaker, 
Hershey, Orwig, and Rhojahn gave 
several very good selections. Next 
was a series of popular song hits, 
given in a masterful way by Hafer at 
the piano. A second quartet consist- 
ing of Kiehner, Aungst, Lewars and 
Mentzer also sang same popular pep 
songs. This was followed by a well 
rendered trumpet solo, by Wampler. 
He can certainly make that trumpet 
talk. Light-footed Joe Bruno then 
gave a very pleasing exhibition of 
the Charleston. Darkes Albright 
cracked several jokes, and Disney in- 
formed the society on several curre it 
events. And last, but not least, Hen 
Ludwig and Bill Shaw entertained 
jointly on the piano. These fellows 
are extraordinary entertainers, of 
much fame throughout Lebanon 
County, and are always welcome on 
the program. Smokes, eats, and cider 
finally made the evening complete. 

On Friday, January 21, the hall 
was again well filled for a good pro- 
gram. The program that evening 
was strictly literary and was well 
rendered. Foerelli gave a very inter- 
esting account of the customs of his 
native country, telling us many new 
things. We were then well informed 
on the Mexican trouble by Alwein. 

The question: Resolved, that it is 
better to be rich than goodlooking. 
was discussed by Vanderwall and 
Toronto. No agreement was reached, 
although many ideas were created. 
Archie Lutz as the jester resurrected 
mirth after which Ulrich gave us the 
past, present and future of the bas- 
ketball season. 



CLIOS AND DELPHS 

IN JOINT-SESSION 



On Friday evening, January 21, th.' 
Delphian Literary Society entertain- 
ed the Clionian Literary Society at a 
joint session in Delphian HalJ. The 
program, which was well rendered, 
portrayed a typical "Fireside Even- 
ing" as follows: — 

Pianologue Mary McLanachan 

Book Review Nelda Spatz 

Quartette — Winifred Peck, piano; 

Alcesta Slichter, violin; Mary 
Oberly and Arabelle Overly, 
vocal duet. 

Reading Winifred Peck 

Solo Eleanor Snoke 

Debate — Resolved: That there shou'-! 
be a girls' athletic association at 
Lebanon Valley; Aff., Esther 
Flickinger, Hilda Hess; Neg., 
Ruth Strubbar, Madeline Rife. 
After the program, the usual social 
hour followed which was enjoyed by 
all. 



INSULATION, WIT 

AND HUMOR AT CLIO 



The newly elected officers of the 
Clionian Literary Society were duly 
installed at the regular, weekly meet- 
ing of Clio. They are as follows: 

President Madeline Mark 

Vice-President Esther Walmer 

Recoiding Secretary Mary Geyer 

Cor. Secretary Mabel Hafer 

Critic Jennie Shoop 

Pianist Mary Hart/ 

Editor Mabel Brewbake^ 

Chaplain Emma Shaeffer 

After the installation ceremony a 
very interesting program was ren- 
dered. Anyone, who is seeking real 
wit, need not travel away from L. V. 
C. in order to find it. Esther Walmer 
and Anna Mark gave full proof of 
that. A simple but charming dance 
brought Alcesta Schlicter and Cor- 
inne Dyne into the foot-lights of 
CLIO Hall. It was done to the tune 
of "Jingle Bells." The last number 
was a sketch directed by Kathryn 
Bork. Liveliness and fun were stel- 
lar attractions, portraying the eter- 
nal masculine and the eternal fem- 
inine. 



dents, 62 men and 45 women. We 
find this conservatism not confined 
generally true of both men and 
women. There was practictlly a 
unanimous vote for the enforcement 
of the 18th Amendmenet; a legalized 
censorship of the movies; the prohi- 
bition of organized strikes in ind- 
dustry; and a strong disapproval of 
smoking among women. Such ques- 
tions as the World Court and The 
League of Nations received equal 
support for and against. The results 
obtained on that part of the survey 
concerning religion, reflects favor- 
ably for a church school. Since 
know the temper of mind of our 
student body, it will be interesting to 
compare our reactions with those of 
the entire group of American stud- 
ents. This data will be sent to us by 
Professor Cortright, in return for our 
cooperation in this project, as soon 
as he has tabulated the results. 

Below is the tabulation of results, 
indicating the opinions of the Men 
and Women (Seniors and Juniors) of 
Lebanon Valley College. 

I Political 
No. M. and W. Men Women 
Yes No Yes No Yes « » 
102 3 58 2 44 



5 
65 
46 
48 
97 



101 
40 
61 
57 
4 



4 57 

37 23 

26 36 

25 37 

53 2 



1 

1 44 
28 17 
20 25 
23 20 
44 2 



7. 


15 


90 


9 


51 


6 


8. 


27 


77 


10 


50 


17 






II Welfare 






9. 


19 


85 


14 


47 


5 


10. 


33 


69 


16 


42 


17 


11. 


90 


16 


54 


7 


36 


12. 


92 9 


54 


7 


38 


13. 


11 


94 


6 


54 


5 


14. 


94 


12 


51 


10 


43 






III Religious 




15. 


95 


12 


57 


5 


38 


16 


106 





61 





45 


17. 


59 


46 


33 


27 


26 


18. 


66 


41 


33 


29 


33 


19. 


28 


77 


10 


51 


18 




IV Educational 




20. 


76 


31 


47 


15 


29 


21. 


70 


37 


38 


24 


32 


22. 


82 


24 


46 


15 


36 






V Morality 






23. 


46 


61 


31 


31 


15 


24. 


14 


92 


6 


56 


8 


25. 


32 


75 


20 


42 


12 


26. 


63 


39 


35 


26 


28 






VI 


Social 






27. 


82 


23 


48 


13 


34 


28. 


23 


83 


13 


47 


10 


29. 


92 


14 


43 


9 


39 


30. 


99 


7 


54 


7 


45 


31. 


61 


44 


31 


29 


30 




VII Economic 




32. 


63 


44 


34 


28 


29 


33. 


61 


44 


40 


21 


21 


34. 


70 


34 


37 


25 


33 


35. 


53 


51 


27 


33 


25 


36. 


15 


89 


9 


53 


6 



36 



CLARENCE ULRICH 

PHILO PRESIDENT 



Scientific discussions were foremcs' 
in the Philo program of Friday even- 
ing, January 21. The different speak 
ers showed particular ability in giv- 
ing interesting talks on supposedly 
serious facts kept the interest at a 
high tension, The numbers compos- 
ing the program were: 
Exploring the Electron Universe__ 

Homer Wiest 

Weather Predictions Ira Matter 

Molds Harold Heir 

Hunting the Ivories Robert Jacks 

Feature Number David Rank- 
Lectures in Psychology_Leroy Fegley 
General Sciences Editor 

For Friday evening, January 28, a 
feature program has been prepared 
It is made up entirely of a mock trial 
with the familiar charge of bootleg- 
ging as the crime committed by the 
defendant. Come and see whether 
the defendant is really guilty as 
charged. Those taking part in the 
trial in one way or another are: 

Judge Samuel Meyer 

Defendant Carl William Sloat 

Plaintifi Glenn BendigT 

Lawyer for Defense Paul Hunte.- 

Lawyer for Plaintiff-Albert Kelchnev 

Witness Abram Dohner 

Witness Harry Stone 

Witness Uhl Kuhn 

Philo held the regular term elec- 
tion last week and the following offi- 
cers were elected and installed: 

President Clarence Ulrich 

Vice President Arnold Zwally 

Rec. Secretary Harvey Nitraue*- 

Corr. Secretary Daniel Pugl- 

Critic _Charles Wis<? 

Pianist Jacob Horst 

Ch. Ex. Comm Paul Moser 

Janitors 

Paul Barnhart 
Millard Miller 
Milford Knisely 

MUHLENBERG & WESTERN 
MARYLAND VICTIMS OF 
BLUE & WHITE CAGERS 
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 
teams of Mt. St. Mary's and George- 
town University. Both resulted in 
defeaets for the home team Mt. St. 
Mary's beating us 33-12 and George- 
town 36-30. The local team was un- 
able to overcome the early lead of 
each team due to sickless and injur- 
ies of the players. 



Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Studio and Home Portraits 
Films Printed and Developed 
Promptly 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Win. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



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OF QUALITY 

Annville _____ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



We Recommend 

Shaeffer Lifetime 
Fountain Pens 

Absolutely the Best Pen 
Made, and Guaranteed 
to Last a Lifetime 

HARPEL'S 

757-759 Cumberland St. 
THE GIFT STORE OF LEBANON 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 

THE HUB 

713 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA. 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF QUALITY 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

36 North Eighth Street, LEBANON, PA. 



I 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 2G, 1927 



Kampus Kracks 



Happy Mid-Year's! ! ! 
If it's true 
That those 

Parts of our anatomy 
Which we do 
Not use 

Soon disappear, — 
Then the ancestors 
Of some of us 
Must have 
Been a 

"Nosey" bunch. 
Which they were! 



Joe Campus says he doesn't believe 
that kissing is unhealthy— he's never 
been sick. 



Fegley (just returning from 
home): There was a big crowd at 
church on Sunday night. 

Reissinger: New minister? 

Fegley: Naw, the place burned 
down! 



Prof. Gingrich (in Law Class): I'm 
going to call you "Necessity" Lich- 
tenberger. 

Baron: How so? 

Prof: Because you know no law. 

The Gettysburg "Cannon Bawl" 
asks whether the Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege Glee Club is necessarily the "An- 
vil Chorus." What'll we tell 'em? 



Some radio announcers should be 
seen and not heard. 



Zemski: Do you know him? 
"Dan": Yeah. He sleeps beside me 
in History. 



Someone has said that in the old 
days the girl spent the evening won- 
dering whether the man was going 
to try to kiss her. Now she wonders 
when. How about it? 



"Bawl two," cried the umpire. Cor- 
lect — twins! 



"Speed" Knisley (In Lebanon): 
May I kiss you if I take you home? 

The Girl: I never kiss anyone. 

"Speed" (Later) : Is your mother at 
home? 

She (After a while): Yeah — but 
Paw wouldn't let you kiss my mother 



The choruses in some musical com- 
edies illustrate The Little Theatre 
Movement. 

1st Inebriate: Let's sleep in the 
gutter. 

2nd: How so? 

1st: Plenty of room with running 
water. 



"Gimpy" Slenker's War Cry: 
"Twinkle, twinkle, cheap cigar, 
how I wonder what you are." 



Little Girl: Say, mister, who kille-1 
Cock Robin? 

Sparks: It must have been two 
other fellows. 



LOST AND FOUND 

LOST — Betty Hoy lost Chic Wise. 
Note: We mean his picture. 

LOST— Kay and Blanche lost their 
appetite, due to Zorkie's "dead duck." 

FOUND — One pair of gloves at the 
lumber yard. Same can be had by 
aprtlvinsr at Speed's office. 

LOST — Thursday evening. January 
20th. B bushel of Dad's onions. 

FOUND — Traces of lost onions are 
beinp- scented in the nir. 

LOST— Sara Blecker's permanent 
wave, due to Inst week's climatic con- 
dition. For return of same, liberal 
reward offered. 



Athletic Club Gives 

Regular Weekly Program 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 
crew took the lead early in the con- 
test when Hercules Schwalm caged 
a two pointer, at an angle of one hun- 
dred and ninety-five degrees, with 
the floor. The Toronto Aggies, how- 
ever, forged ahead when Bovino 
made two buckets, in rapid succes- 
sion, from the shadow of the enemy 
basket. Ruddy Keiser, the referee 
then took time out to oil his whistle 
and brush the cobwebs out of the 
baskets. As soon as play had been 
resumed, a fowl was called on Tor- 
onto for standing on Orwig's shoul- 
ders to stop a pass. The Wiest arians. 
encouraged by the pushing of Mim- 
ura, had just launched a powerful 
center rush when the whistle blew 
to end the half. The score stood 
tied at 4 to 4. 

During the intermission there were 
several fast boxing bouts. Among the 
foremost pugilists was Judge Francis 
James Marshall, Jr., who won over 
his roommate, O. K. Myers, by an 
untechnical knockout in the last 
round. Toronto and Bavino fought 
to a pull, Louis Firpo (Condano) won 
the decision over Kitty Hafer, and 
Pug Snyder took Bull Zappia for 
three lively rounds. 

The final period of the basketball 
game found the Aggies unable to 
cope with the fast running and hard 
hitting of their opponents. The ref- 
eree attempted to rob the winners, 
but the sharpshooting of Captain 
Wiest and Secretary Schwalm made 
it impossible. The game ended with 
the score 13 to 11, unfavorable for 
the Aggies. 

The lineup: 
Aggies Wiestarian? 

Schwalm F. Sneath 

Wiest F. Vanderwall 

Orwig C. Toronto 

Bovino G. Emenheiser 

Mumura G. Hertzler 

Referee — Keiser, Lower Village. 

The second program of the series 
was held on January 19. The main 
event being a basketball game be- 
tween the preachers of the dormi- 
tory and the inmates of room four. 
The game was very fast and warmly 
contested throughout. The ministers 
were in the lead throughout the 
game, although they were hard push- 
ed by their opponents at times. The 



For 

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Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 
MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 



MAIN STREET 



first half ended with the score, 16 to 
6 in favor of the parsons. The final 
whistle found the score to be 27 
12 in favor of the preachers. 



Line-ups: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

F.G. F. Tot. 

Gelbert, F. 6 2 14 

Piela, F. 3 __ 6 

Wheeler, C. (Capt.) 1 __ 2 

Miller, C. __ __ __ 

Bell, G. 1 — 2 

Piersol, G. 

Total 24 

MUHLENBERG 

FG. F. Tot, 

Clymer, F. __ 

Lawson, F. — 11 

Coldren, F. 2 1c 

Sholeums, C. 2 __ 4 

Dechert, C. and G 1 1 

Slemer, G. .._ 

Borelli, G. 

Total 13 

Referee — Gehringer. 



LEBANON VALLEY 

F.G. F. Tot. 

Gelbert, F 2 1 

Piela, F. . U — -- 

Smith, F. 2 4 

Wheeler, C. (Capt.) 1 1 3 

Bell, G. 113 

Piersol, G. __ __. __ 

Elberti, G. __ __ 

Total . 14 

LOYOLA 

F.G. F. Tot. 

Wiggins, F. 13 5 

Enright, F. __ __ _- 

Hulfrich, C. (Capt.) 2 __ 4 

Kone, C. __ — 

Rodgers, G. __ 2 2 

Bunting, G. 1 __ 2 

Childs, G — — — 

Dudley, G. 6 1 13 

Total 26 

Referee — Mentin. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE W0RNA3 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



D. L Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 



Annville 



Pa. 



Bowling and Billiards 



LEBANON VALLEY 

F.G. F. Tot. 

Gelbert, F. 7 __ 14 

Smith, F. __ __ __ 

Piela, F. 9 __ 18 

Shroyer, F. , 

Wheeler, C. (Capt.) 12 4 

Miller, C. __ _ 

Bell, G. __ 2 2 

Piersol, G. 

Elberti, G. __ __ 

Total 38 

WESTERN MARYLAND 

F.G. F. Tot. 

Broil, F. (Capt.) 5 10 

Elles, F. __ 1 2 

O'Lear, C. 1 2- 4 

Williams, C. __ __ __ 

Weigle, G. 1 — 2 

Weinstock, G. __ 

Machmer, G. 2 __ 4 

Total 1.2 

Referee — Ontegram. 



Luke L. Light, '25, and Hilliai i 
Smuck, '26, visited the college last 
week. 

Homer Wieder, '26, spent several 
days visiting friends at the college, 
last week. 




from your old 
shoes-Vferepair 
/®<&\ them lots of wear 

ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR 
COMPANY 



Fine 

Home-Made 
Candies 

LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 

A fine place to treat your 
friend 

TSCHUDY'S 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. O. Bldg. 
West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



MO 



DROPS 
USED 

DR. HARRIS GRUMAN 

Eyesight Specialist — Optometrist 

GLASSES REPAIRED 
•10 N. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Full Line 

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Specialties in 

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Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

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FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 

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BOOKS and STATIONERY 



STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE, PA- 



DON'T FORGET 
DELPHIAN ANNIVERSARY 
FRIDAY NIGHT 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



TURN ALL GUNS 
ON THE GETTYSBURG 



BULLETS 



VOLUME II 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1927 



NUMBER 8 



SCHUYLKILL AND ALBRIGHT DEFEATED 

IN CLOS E GAMES B Y BLUE AND WHITE 

Record Crowd Fills Lebanon High Gymnasium to See One of 
the Best Collegiate Basket Ball Games 
Ever Offered in Lebanon 



ALBRIGHT COLLEGIANS 
PLAY EXCELLENT GAME 



In the most interesting game ever 
played on the Lebanon High School 
gymnasium, Lebanon Valley College, 
before a huge crowd of spectators 
defeated their old rival Albright Col- 
lege by the score of 35-33. Both col- 
leges have a very good team this 
year which fact made the game a 
greater drawing card to those inter- 
ested in the annual basketball con- 
tests. 

The Lebanon Valley band was ap- 
preciated by all and added much in- 
terest during the intervals of cheei- 
ing between the rival colleges. Leba- 
non Valley College quintet appeared 
on the floor a few minutes after the 
Albright team. Cheer after cheer 
(Continued on Page 3) 



BASE BALL SCHEDULE 
IS NEARLY COMPLETE 

Eighteen Games have Already 
been Scheduled with 
G-burg as Opener 



The Baseball schedule for this year 
has been arranged, and promises to 
be one of the best in many years. 
About eighteen games have been ar- 
ranged, including quite a number 
which will be played on the home 
grounds. 

The following is the arranged 
schedule thus far: April 12, Gettys- 
burg, away; April 20, Schuylkill, 
away; April 27, Lafayette, away; 
April 30, Schuylkill, home; May 7, 
Western Maryland, home; May 10, 
Mt. St. Mary's, away; May 11, 
Georgetown, away; May 14, Mt. St. 
Mary's, home; May 18, Muhlenberg, 
away; May 21, Dickinson, away; May 
25, Susquehanna, away; May 28, Sus- 
quehanna, home; May 30, Albright, 
Lebanon; June 2, Juniata, away; 
June 3, Penn State, away; June 4. 
Bucknell, away. 

(Continued on Page 2) 

WALLACES CHRISTEN 
SON 



COLLEGE STUDENTS 
HEAR DR. GOSSARD 

President Delivers Sermon on 
Evening Set Apart as 
"College Night" 

Dr. G. D. Gossard, President of Leb- 
anon Valley College, delivered a ser- 
mon in the Annville United Brethren 
Church of Annville, Thursday even- 
ing February 10th, to a large audi- 
ence of both town people and college 
students. The evening was set apart 
as "College Night" of the series of 
evangelistic services which the 
church had had for a period of three 
weeks. 

The Howard Sisters lead the con- 
gregation in a fifteen minute song ser- 
vice, and after prayer by the Rev.- J. 
Owen Jones, the pastor of the College 
Church, the sisters sang a duet, "Oh 
Calvary." 

Dr. Gossard took his text from 
Genesis 7:1, "Come thou and all thy 
(Continued on Page 2) 



CAST FOR JUNIOR 
PLAYS ANNOUNCED 



Rehearsals Begin at 
No Date Set for 
Presentation 



Once 



Prof P. W. Wallace, head of the 
English Department made final se- 
lections last week for the casts of 
this year's three Junior plays, and 
rehearsals are ilready in progress. 
The juniors responded very well to 
the call for tryouts, so that the coach 
had a wealth of material to choose 
from. Fully thirty-five of the clas? 
of '28 tried for the various parts in 
the three plays. 

The plays selected this year will 
form a well balanced program. The 
first is "He," a powerful drama of tht 
sea, by Eugene O'Neill, the greatest 
dramatist in the history of American 
drama. Sir James Barrie's, "The Weil 
Remembered Voice" will be the sec- 
ond play of the evening. This play 
which is perhaps the best of Barrie's 
shorter ones, is taken from his 
"Echoes of the War." "The Dark 
Lady of the Sonnets," a clever force 
(Continued on Page 4) 



LADIES AUXILIARYS' 
BIRTHDAY ANNIVERSARY 



David Harold Wallace, seven 
Week's old son of Dr. and Mrs. 
P. A. W. Wallace, was baptized on 
Sunday afternoon at 6 o'clock by 
Dr. G. D. Gossard, president of 
Lebanon Valley College. The 
Christening robe was a dress made 
by the grandmother, mother of 
Mrs. Wallace, which is 56 years 
old, and has been handed down 
to all the grandchildren, as a 
Christening robe. 

Tea was served after the bap- 
tism to these guests: Dr. and Mrs. 
K D. Gossard, Dr. and Mrs. O. E. 
Reynolds, Dr. and Mrs. Harold 
Rennet, Miss Mary Kathryn Wal- 
lace and Miss Lucy Sutherland. 



Auxiliary of College Success- 
fully Celebrates Seventh 
Birthday Anniversary 

The Ladies' Auxiliary of Lebanon 
Valley College successfully celebrated 
its seventh birthday anniversary on 
Thursday afternoon, February 10th, 
the date of the sixtieth anniversary 
of the college. The birthday pro- 
gram was staged in a perfect setting, 
the parlors of North Hall which were 
beautifully decorated for the occasion. 
The guests included, in addition to 
the large local representation, mem- 
bers and freinds of the college fro in 
Lebanon, Palmyra, Hummelstown and 
New York City. 

The president of the auxiliary, 
Mrs. G. D. Gossard, opened the pro- 
gram with an appropriate address 
and devotional exercises. Mrs. Goss- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 
CLASSES HAVE BEGUN 

Prof. Stokes is Now Instruct- 
ing Girls' Gym Classes 
Twice a Week 



Physical Training for girls is be- 
ginning to receive recognition at 
Lebanon Valley. Classes in this im- 
portant subject are being conducted 
by Prof. M. L. Stokes, every Monday 
and Tuesday evenings from 6 to 8 
o'clock. Prof. Stokes, who is also 
coaching basketball for girls this year 
is a very capable physical instructor, 
and his courses are much appreciated 
by every girl. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



ELSWORTH GILBERT 
DELIGHTSVERY MANY 

Adanac Male Quartet to Appear 
for Last Attraction on 
Star Course 

Ellsworth Gilbert and his Metro- 
politan Singers rendered, in Engle 
Hall, February 7th, one of the most 
delightful concerts that have been 
heard here for many years. The Stai 
Course Committee, under whose aus- 
pices they appeared, is certainly to be 
congratulated for securing such 
talent. 

The Metropolitan program while 
primarily vocal, contained just enough 
of the instrumental music to make it 
well balanced, and to insure an even- 
ing of entertainment for everyone. 

The two little Hungarian girls dis- 
played their superior ability on the 
violin and cello. Mr. Gilbert, coach 
and director, as basso had an impor- 
tant part in the company's success. 
The solos of Miss Bonifield, soprano; 
Miss Jirak, contralto; and Mr. Stock- 
well, baritone were very much ap- 
preciated. 

The company rendered selections 
from grand and light opera, made 
classics of popular numbers, and used 
the vocal-insrumental combination 
very effectively. 

The Star Course committee an- 
nounces that for the fourth and last 
number it will present a company 
that is even more popular with Amer- 
ican audiences, "The Adanac Male 
Quartet." This company will appear 
on March 8th and it is hoped that 
every student will be out to hear 
them. 

A part of the program is given in 
Scottish costume, and we will again 
have a chance to hear some of those 
old Scottish ballads. 

The committee wishes to give you 
only the best talent, and this can oe 
done, only if you support the com- 
mittee. 



DELPHIANS WILL CELEBRATE FIFTH 

ANNIVERSARY TOMORROW EVENING 

Program has not been Made Public, but a Stiring Historic 
Drama Will Feature — Society Promises 
Best Anniversary Yet Celebrated 



MANY ALUMNI ARE EXPECTED TO BE PRESENT 



ILLNESS AND GRADES 
HARD ONiGLEE CLUB 

Strenuous Efforts of Members 
and Prof. Rogers Helps 
Relieve Condition 



RECEPTION IN THE 

ALUMNI GYMNASIUM 



Apparently, this year is the un- 
lucky year for the Glee Club. This 
is rathe* pessimistic statement, no 
doubt, but, nevertheless, it seems 
hard luck is continually following the 
club. At the beginning of the re- 
hearsals everything looked bright and 
rosy, even though it was necessary 
for the director, Prof. Rogers, to 
break in a large number of new mei . 
However, since the Christmas holi- 
days there has been one reverse after 
another. 

The first and most serious was due 
to the sudden illness of the president, 
Mr. Alfred Hershey, who has been 
suffering with pneumonia for several 
(Continued on Page 3) 



INTERIOR DECORATING 
OFFERED TO THE CO-EDS 



One Hundred and Fifteen Co- 
Eds Have Registered for the 
New Course 



Mr. Frederick Frantz of the firm of 
D. A. Frantz and Son, Lebanon, is 
generously offering the young women 
of Lebanon Valley College a course 
in furniture, its history romance, and 
arrangement, consisting of a series of 
four or more lectures. Lebanon 
Valley College is exceedingly fortu- 
nate and also unique considering the 
fact that such a course has never by- 
fore been presented in any collegiate 
institution of eastern United States. 

One hundred and fifteen girls have 
registered for the course and attend- 
ed the first lecture on Thursday even- 
ing, Feb. 10th. The class will meet 
one hour every Thursday evening in 
(Continued on Page 4) 



CO-EDS SWAMP PENN 
HALL IN FAST GAME 

Meyer Stars for Blue and 
White with Five 
Field Goals 



On Saturday, February 5, at Cham- 
bersburg, the Lebanon Valley sex- 
tette swamped the Penn Hall team 
by a score of 18-1. The game, which 
began at 3:30 P. M. was fast and 
interesting. The Penn Hall team iv 
to be congratulated on its clever, 
clean passing. Emma Meyer, Leba- 
non Valley forward, scored five of 
the total eight field goals. The team 
as a whole played a fine game, each 
player doing her bit towards gain- 
ing the spoils. 



Tomorrow evening, February 18, 
the Delphian Literary Society will 
celebrate its fifth anniversary. The 
society, which was organized through 
the inadequacy of one girl's literary 
society on the campus, has flourished 
admirably since its beginning. On 
such an occasion, the best of each 
girl is required to make a success of 
this, the big event of the year. Every 
member is busy and from the outlook 
of thing, the program this year 
should be better than ever before. 
Not only those on the program are 
working to make it a success but all 
the members of the numerous com- 
mittees are cooperating faithfully. 



"CHAT BOOK" MAKES 
FIRSTAPPEARANCE 

The Writers' Club Displays 
Talent in It's New 
Publication 

Several days ago "The Chat Book," 
a Writers' Club publication, made its 
initial appearance on the campus and 
was well received by the student 
body. So well did the students like 
the book that a hurry call for a 
second edition was necessary. 

On Thursday, February 10th, the 
Writers' Club took charge of the 
chapel exercises and at that time the 
cat was left out of the bag. The 
secret has been in keeping for sev- 
eral months and it was indeed a sur- 
prise to many. For several days 
prior to the appearance of the pub- 
lication, every student seemed inter- 
ested in a poster which appeared in 
the Ad-building and which fortold 
of something in the wind. Ingenious 
minds sought the solution to the pro- 
blem, but the secret was maintained. 
In the Thursday morning exercises, 
(Continued on Page 4) 



"OUITTIE" PROGRESSING 



Final work on this year's 
"Quittie" has begun, and the book 
is taking shape. A finished sam- 
ple of the cover, which came in 
this week, proved to be "delight- 
fully different." The editor has 
already received the proof for the 
first "dummy" and is prepared to 
send in the remaining "Copy" on 
schedule time. The engravings 
which are coming through are all 
of the best and the printer is giv- 
ing splendid service. Numerous 
new features have been planned 
and the art work is especially at- 
tractive. Look out for a "best- 
ever" book! Save your dollars 
folks— they'll soon be here!!! 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, February 18, 1927 



latieCotkjienne 




PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 
WALTER L. NESS, '27 
, Associate Editors 

MYRA 0. SHEAFFER, '27 MARY McLANACHAN, '27 

Conservatory 1 RUTH STRUBHAR, '2D 

AthWics _ _ ELMER REISER, '2b 

aio ' " _ _ „ ALICE KINDT, '28 

Delphian"!"-" KATHRYN YOUNG, '27 

Kalo _ _ LAWRENCE DERICKSON, '2D 

Philo I" " J- BRUCE BEHNEY, '28 

General ~_~ * EDNA C. GRAHAM, '28 

DARKES ALBRIGHT ,'2S 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WADE S. MILLER, '27 

Circulation Manager CLARENCE ULRICH, 

Associate Business Manager RAYMOND KOCH, 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



EDITORIALS 



6:10 P.M. 
7:00 P.M.- 
Meeting 
8:00 P.M.- 



February 17 
— Ministerium. 
-Y. M. C. A. 



Cabinet 



HIGH OR LOW STANDARDS? WHICH? 

The most discussed question on the campus today is grades 
and their results. No matter where we turn we hear discussions 
pro and con on the subject. You are nearly safe, when fou see 
a group m a heated argument, to guess it is one on grades. The 
questions which always arise are — "Was that exam fair?" "What 
do you think of this prof essor s marking?" "What grade did you 
get in a certain subject?" "Who grades the easiest, who marks 
the hardest?" But after all these questions have been discusseu 
to their fullest, the one great question which ultimately arises 
is — "What do you think of sending a student home because of 
low grades? Some are in favor of it, while others staunchly op 
pose it. A few days ago while listening to one of these argu 
ments we gathered the following points on both sides of the 
question: 

It is a known and recognized fact that some persons have 
higher mental capacities than others. Is it fair to deprive a per 
son of a chance merely because his native ability is lower than 
that of his classmates? He may be willing and conscientiou 
and may try his level best to succeed in certain courses but fails 
He may be able to pass successfully eight hours a semester 
through concentration on those particular subjects. It may be 
utterly impossible for him regardless of the amount of energy 
put on his work to pass seventeen hours a semester. Then, is it 
fair to deprive him of a college education? 

Again, some people had never been taught how to study 
when they entered college. It takes them at least a semester to 
adjust themselves and to form a habit of study. Now, is it fair 
to send them home because of low grades just at the time when 
they have acclimated themselves? 

If an individual is willing to take but eight hours a semes- 
ter and go to college until he has completed his work, should the 
college interfere? As long as the person pays his tuition the col- 
lege should care little whether he stays four years or eight years. 
It is an individual's concern as to how long he goes to school, 
the college should only see that only persons successfully com- 
pleting their work should receive diplomas. 

On the other hand we heard the following arguments: 

If a student has failed why should the college want him 
here? It certainly lowers the scholastic standards of a college 
to send out graduates not fit for the work they will be called 
upon to do. It always reflects back on the college. Mentally 
lazy, careless, and indifferent students lower the morale of any 
school and certainly Lebanon Valley cannot escape this if she 
retains any type of a student. Do we want to sacrifice the 
school and the standard of all our graduates and those yet to be 
graduates for the sake of retaining a few indifferent students? 

If it is a rule of Lebanon Valley that when a student has 
not passed a certain number of hours that he be sent home then 
let the college uphold that principle. It weakens any individual 
or organization to say a thing and then not live up to it. If the 
rule is a wise one, obey it; if not, abolish it- 

Often the fact that a boy or girl is sent home because of lack 
of study opens his eyes and shows to him that in order to make 
his way in life he must work. There is no room in the world for 
the indolent individual. If the sending of a student home from 
college awakens him and proves to be an incentive to him to 
begin to truly work, then the college has rendered him one of 
the greatest services of his life — for it will have made of him 
a man. 

Another argument in favor of this action was stated in this 
manner: "An example to those who remain at Lebanon Valley." 
Again, if a person who has failed in several subjects should be 
kept here it would no doubt be a waste of time and money to that 
student. That individual is fitted for some other trade or profes- 
sion in life and evidently has not found the right one. We must 
admit individual differences and if he cannot profit by school 
life, he will learn in life's school. 



-College Band practice. 
February 18 
8:00 P.M. — Fifth Anniversary of 
Delphian Literary Society. 

February 19 
2:30 P.M.— Gettysburg Girls vs. 
Lebanon Valley Girls at Annville. 
February 20 
5:45 P.M.— Joint Y. W. — Y. M. 
Meeting. 

February 21 

4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M. — Writers' Club. 
7:30 P.M.— Gettysburg vs. Lebanon 
Valley at Gettysburg. 
9:00 P.M.— Men's Senate. 

February 22 
4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

6:40 P.M. — Student Volunteer 
Meeting. 

February 23 
4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board Meet 
ing. 

6:15 P.M.— L. Club Entertainment 

7:30 P.M. — Franklin and Marshall 
vs. Lebanon Valley at Lebanon, 
ebruary 24 

6:10 P.M. — Ministerium. 

6:00 P.M. — Class in Interior Deco 
rating by Mr. Frantz. 

7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

8:00 P.M. — College Band practice 

February 25 
7:00 P.M. — Regular sessions of the 
literary societies. 

February 26 
2:30 P.M. — Gettysburg girls vs 
Lebanon Valley girls at Getysburg 
February 27 
5:45 P.M.— Y. W. Devotional Serv 
ice. 

February 28 
4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M.— Reader's Club. 
7:30 P.M.— Franklin and Marshal 
vs. Lebanon Valley at Lancaster. 
9:00 P.M— Men's Senate. ' 
March 1 

4:00 P.M— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 

Meeting. 

6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer Mee 
Ing. 

March 2 

4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board Meet 
ing. 



COLLEGE STUDENTS 

HEAR DR. GOSSARD 



(Continued from Page 1) 
house into the ark" the words of God 
to man, to Noah, in the spiritual sett- 
ing. In his sermon, Dr. Gosard ex- 
plained how God has made provision 
for every one of us to enter into the 
ark of eternal life just as He spared 
Noah's earthly life by insructing him 
to build an ark. 

After the sermon, the Howard sis- 
ters sang a beautiful duet, "God is 
willing are you?" An added number 
was a female quartette, Miss Miriam 
Oyer, Miss Anna Kreider, Miss Helen 
Longenecker and Mrs. A K. Mills. 
They sang "Teach Me to Pray." 

On Wednesday evening, February 
9th, Professor G. A. Richie of the col- 
lege preached on the special service 
called Sunday School Night." 



BASE BALL SCHEDULE 
IS NEARLY COMPLETED 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Besides these definitely arranged 
games there are three more games 
pending and have been arranged 
with the exception of the definite 
dates on which they will be played. 
These are with Franklin and Mar- 
shall, Juniata, and Villanova. The 
students are well pleased with this 
season's schedule and appreciate the 
work of those who have to de with 
the arrangement of same. 




"O wad some Pow'r the giftie tie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see usr 



—BURNS 



CLIPPINGS FROM THE LITTLE BLUE BOOK 



Tragedy versus Comedy! 
This is life, and "we're some- 
times up and sometimes down." 
Aristophanes is credited as be- 
ing- the father of Comedy and 
what a healthy, ever growing 
offspring he has fostered! 

The first week of February 
staged five days of Tragedy for 
L. V. students, and each one of 
us were given a pressing invita- 
tion to be a competitor and 
hand in our contribution to art. 
The professors sat as judges to 
decide whether these master- 
pieces were of a Tragic or Com- 
ic strain Now we will pre- 
tend that all these little (?) er- 
rors are soldiers marching in 
before us; we, the Faculty and 
students, will represent the in- 
terested audience. 

Now suppose Student X, Y, 
or Z, that Soldier A would bow 
to you. He recognizes you as 
his creator — take Prince Hal's 
method in dealing with Falstaff 
— give him the "cold shoulder"! 
You can't afford to associate 
with him anymore, why your 
Future at this institution de- 
pends upon your success at 
throwing over board such asso- 
ciates as he. 

The curtain rises. The little 
soldiers march in. Some of them 
are rather bulky. They belong- 
to the "stringing a line" divi- 
sion, and it was their weight 
that proved fatal. Here are 
some sprightly ones, they 
should have fared better due to 
their lack of cumbersome asso- 
ciations—but alas! They are 
called the "simplified spelling" 
corps, and are in great disdain. 

A little soldier, tattered, torn, 
maimed and blind steps for- 
ward and tells his experience. 
I am all that remains of one of 
the girl's notes which she took 
to class carefully prepared on 
small cards, but mine was a ter- 
rible fate. Suddenly the enemy 
(Professor) advanced and my 
mistress, in dire distress lest I 
be detected, put me in her 
mouth and chewed me, long and 
savagely — the only thing that 
saved me from Jonah's experi- 
ence was the recharge by the 
enemy in another direction. 

Here is a sprightly little guy 
who admits that he carried this 
information in a question on 
Latin mythology, "The river 
that flows past Hell is the 
Stynx." 

This little soldier-error main- 
tains that his mistaken identity 
is not as serious as those of his 
fellows for he happened to be a 
True-False statement. The only 
thing his master did was to ad- 
mit the statement that "Erastus 
was a Saracus." 

Then here is one who in his 
dosire to be accurate gave the 
French department some infor- 
mation concerning a "Prisoner- 
ess." 



From another corner of the 
stage ambles this representative 
of a cross between Economics 
and English history. He was 
written as a "bill of attainder" 
in an economics paper. His cor- 
rect title? A bill of exchange, 
of coujrse! 

The soldiers in the cutter 
front deserves the conspicuous 
place by virtue of the defini- 
tion he presented in the Physics 
exam. Listen to him speak! 
"My first words are one of apol- 
ogy to those who are familiar 
with the scientific terms we 
Physicists use. Just now I shall 
tell you what 'Resonance' is. 
Whether you are familiar with 
this word or not, all can easily 
recognize the worth of this 
homely definition. 'When the 
butcher comes within one block 
of the house, the dog barks 
and that is resonance!' " 

Perhaps by this time the audi- 
ence is tiring of these individual 
experiences. There is a still 
greater treat in store. The Eng- 
lish errors were as numerous and 
so choice that they have decided 
to stage an examination, made 
up entirely of recruits from 
their ranks. 

"Examination in English" 

1. Identify the following per- 

sons: — 

A. Lehigh Hunt. 

B. Thomas A- Becket. 

2. Give the substance of the 

following: 

A. "Ode on a distant pros- 
pect of going to Eton College-" 

(Note: This may be helpful 
ambitious students or students 
otherwise — ) 

B. Irving's "Scrap Book." 

C. Herrick's "Euripides 
and the Noble Watchman." 

D. Burn's "Lines to Saint 
Patrick." 

E. Gray's "Eulogy of a 
Country Church Yard." 

F. Walton's "Complete 
Angular." 

3. Locate and explain the fol- 
lowing passages: 

A. "I have taken all know- 
ledge to be my profits." 

B. Sweet is pleasure after 
pain; None but the brave de- 
serve the beautiful." 

4. Discuss the following state- 
ments: 

A- Keat's style is noted 
for its emotional equalities. 

B. Sheley married on a 
free basis. 

C. Defoe was born before 
the Restoration and after the 
Chicago fire. 

This last selection, being of 
such superior merit, in its own 
line, the program will close for 
the season. As the little soldiers 
march off, part of the audience 
is heard laughing and applaud- 
ing; the other part murmers, "*1 
may be comedy to you but its 
tragedy to us." 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, February 18, 1927 



PAGE THREE 



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SCHUYLKILL & ALBRIGHT 

DEFEATED IN CLOSE 
GAMES BY BLUE & WHITE 



(Continued from Page 1) 

vvas given alternately by both stu 
<Jent bodies and gave great impetus 
of pep to the players. 

In the opening of the fray Leba- 
non Valley took a fifteen point lead 
to that of Albright's four points. It 
•was not long however until the score 
became very close and continued 
thus until the end of the game. Gel- 
bert, of Lebanon Valley, was in full 
form and added a few buckets in 
rapid succession. Throughout the 
game he was the sensational man on 
the floor and it was his final field 
goal which decided the game. The 
guarding on both sides was verj> 
good, while the forwards were kept 
busy trying to score. Albright 
showed very good form throughout 
and were successful in making their 
shots count at the opportune time 
On seven occasions the score was 
tied. At first they were deadlocked 
at 20-20. Piela added a field goal 
and foul and made it 23-20. Greggs, 
of Albright, then did the same. The 
next tie was at 28, when Bell forged 
ahead and "planted" a shot in the 
bucket from nearly the center of the 
floor. Clemens added a field and 
foul to make the score 29-28. The 
score remained the same for a few 
minutes. The final gong rang with 
the score at 30-30. Both captains 
agreed to a five minute extra period. 
Lebanon Valley led in the scoring- 
with a field goal and foul. Albright 
again retaliated with the same score 
In the last few seconds Gelber 
throwed the sphere through the net 
work making the final score 35-33. 

Never in history of the colleges 
was a game so bitterly fought for, 
and as close in score. One time Al- 
bright students went wild, then Leba- 
non Valley, and vice versa. The Al- 
bright center played a very good 
game but failed to get the tip off 
from Wheeler during the greater 
part of the game. Piersol showed 
great form and was very influential 
in keeping Albright from scoring 
throughout the game. Snyder, of 
Albright, proved to be very alert 
throughout, and helped a great deal 
to keep his team in the scoring 
range. 

The game was at all times played 
with much fervor and in a sports- 
manlike manner. The spectators 
agreed as a majority that it was one 
of the best basketball games ever 
played in Lebanon. 

Albright has another chance to 
come back when they play Lebanon 
Valley in a second game in March. 
There is no doubt but that it will 
add even greater interest for both 
teams are about evenly matched and 
will in the course of the next few 
weeks prepare for the final fray. 



Lebanon Valley 




Albright 


Gelbert 


F. 


Kearns 


Piela 


F. 


Kunzler 


Wheeler 


C. 


Sherrill 


Piersol 


G. 


Wissler 


Bell _ 


G. 


Greggs 



Substitutions — L. V. C: Shroyer for 
Gelbert, for Shroyer; Mauer for 
Piela for Mauer; Brubaker for 
Wheeler, for Brubaker; Wood for 
Piersol; Albright for Bell for Al- 
bright. Albright: Snyder for Greggs 
for Wissler; Gunther for Sherrod for 
Kerns for Brown, for Kunzler, for 
Greggs, Clemens for Kunzler. 

Field Goals— Gelbert 4; Piela 3; 
Wheeler 1; Bell 3; Kerns 1; Kunzler 
1; Clemens 1; Sherrid 4; Gunther 1; 
Greggs 1; Snyder 3. 

Foul Goals— Gelbert 6; Piela 5; 
Wheeler 1; Piersol 1: Kerns 1; Kunz- 
*er 1; Clemens 3; Sherrid 2; Wissler- 
*» Greggs 1. 

Referee — Wilsbach, Bucknell; Time 
°f Periods, twenty minutes. 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



TRAVELS IN THE "HOLY 
LAND" ON KALO PROGRAM 



Kalo men are interested in travel. 
This was shown by the very interest- 
ing "Travel Night" which was en- 
joyed by all on Friday evening, Feb. 
11th. The travels began in France, 
the port being The Riviera. This was 
described by Henry Aungst, and al- 
though he does not claim to have 
lived there, his knowledge of the 
place would lead one to think he had. 
Miles Kiehner then told us of some 
of the thrilling experiences he had 
while traveling with Kimberly in 
South Aferica. 

The next traveler was the only one 
of the evening who could talk from 
actual experience. Anyone who 
missed it, missed something worth 
while. It was A Visit to the Holy 
Land, by James Hazelton. The de- 
scription was very clear and gave 
everyone a desire to see the great 
Holy Places. Archie Lutz reversed 
our sentiment by his account of the 
Jineros of Bormeo, and the Incas of 
Peru. The program was concluded 
by Earl Danmoyer's story of the 
great natural resources of Chile. 

In a business meeting, which was 
held after the literary program, it 
was announced that work has been 
started on the Fiftieth Anniversary 
program. Miss Mary K. Wallace has 
consented to coach a play and assist 
in the preparation of the program. 



L. V. 26— SCHUYLKILL 20 

Lebanon Valley College played its 
first home game of the season at 
Lebanon, Jan. 31, when they defeated 
the strong Schuylkill College quintet 
by the score of 26-20. The game 
throughout was a closely contested 
one, for both teams were of practi- 
cally the same strength. Wonderful 
opportunities for a higher score were 
prevailing throughout but both teams 
were somewhat deficient in making 
field goals at times when they were 
easy to be made. Fast team-work 
featured the playing of both oppo- 
nents, while a good passing game 
held the interest of all those present. 

Lebanon Valley throughout the 
game lead in the scoring but in the 
last four minutes of play the score 
was tied at twenty. It was at this 
point that the game became more in- 
teresting. At once Lebanon Valley 
put forth a noble offensive charge, 
with Schuylkill doing the same. 
Three field goals were annexed to the 
local team's score when the bell 
sounded leaving Lebanon Valley the 
victor by 6 points. 

Preceding the game a preliminary 
was played between the "Scrubs" and 
Shenk's Furniture team. The scrubs 
were victorious by 13-8. 
Line-up: 



CLIOS AND PHILOS IN 

CLEVER JOINT-SESSION 



Clio-Philo joint session, held Feb- 
ruary 11th, was a never-to-be-for- 
gotten event in the history of both 
societies. 

Somehow or other Dr. Gossard's 
home took to moving and moved all 
the distance to Philo Hall. Perhaps 
we were seeing dreams of the past 
just as Scrooge saw the Christmas 
past — but, no, these were the spirit 
of the Valentine present. The faculty 
held a Valentine party!!! Leave it to 
them for real party "pep." There 
were hearts aplenty on display. Sad 
to relate most of them were paper 
hearts and therefore not to be de- 
pended upon. 

After the program an hour or sc 
was devoted to sociability. The joint- 
sessions are coming into the limelight 
because of the quality and originality 
of the fun which characterizes them. 



EXTEMPORE PROGRAM 

GIVEN BY DELPHIANS 



On Friday evening, February 11, 
the Delphians showed real talent in 
their clever rendition of an extem- 
poraneous program. Although prep 
aration is an important factor in the 
success of a program, sometimes it 
is well to make a test of ability by 
this kind of a program. 

A Bridge Party 

Diamonds Bernita Strebig 

Spades Mary Olerly, Alice Woy 

Hearts Ruth Strubhar 

Clubs Eddie Grosk 

Trump Fran Lorn 

Prizes — Resolved: That the "Camp- 
usology Course" should be removed 
from the Lebanon Valley curriculum. 

Affirmative Mim Daugherty 

Negative Elva Reigle 



CARL W. SLOAT GUILTY 
OF MAKING MOONSHINE 



ILLNESS AND GRADES 

HARD ON GLEE CLUB 



L.V. COEDS 23-ALBRIGHT 32 

Before a record crowd in the Leba- 
non High School, the Lebanon Valley 
lassies were defeated by the Albright 
sextette in the preliminary game. 
The battle was close throughout the 
game until the last few minutes of 
play, when the Albright forwards 
took a sudden spurt and ran up the 
score to 32 points, making the final 
score 32-23, Albright. The line-up: 
Lebanon Valley Albright 

Rabenstine F. Deck 

Myer F. Hen- 
Miller C. Benfer 

Miller S. C. Stauffer 

Fencil G Willses 

Cochrane-! G. Painter 

(Mark G.) (Deterline F.) 

Referee, Mayer, Harrisburg. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
weeks in a hospital in Harrisbur 
and, without doubt, is lost to the club 
for the entire season. This, indeed, 
is a great loss for Mr. Hershey was 
the leading tenor and a valuable man 
on the quartette. While his duties 
as president are taken by the vice 
president, J. Bruce Behney, yet his 
influence and direction will be great- 
ly missed, and without him the club 
will face a great handicap. 

The second reverse came with the 
illness of Mr. John Walter, a bari- 
tone, who is at home suffering with a 
nervous breakdown. It is doubtful 
if he will be able to accompany the 
club on any of its concerts. Other 
minor illnesses have interrupted the 
progress of the club. 

However, in the face of these dif- 
fiiculties the morale of the club is 
not broken and every member is 
resolved to put forth all his efforts ir, 
order to overcome these obstacles. Tt 
is this spirit which undoubtedly will 
carry the club through a successful 
season. Regardless of these condi- 
tions the management guarantees a 
concert program which will come up 
to the best ever given in previous 
years. An indication of the deter- 
mination is shown in the hastily or- 
ganized quartette consisting of 
Messers Pugh, Oyer, Brubaker and 
Mentzer which, with one week before 
it in which to prepare for the first 
concert, is practicing at every spare 
moment. As far as the club numbers 
are concerned there is not so much 
difficulty encountered, although the 
loss of several members due to low 
scholastic standing was keenly felt. 

As was indicated earlier in this 
article, the first concert will be given 
on Saturday evening in Reading. 



A large crowd of interested spec- 
tators turned out on Friday evening, 
January 28, to see the trial of Carl 
W. Sloat, in Philo Court House. Mr. 
Sloat was charged with illegally con- 
cocting a preparation commonly 
known as "Mountain Dew." The 
trial proved to be one of the most 
bitterly contested trials in history. 
The Commonwealth, headed by At- 
torney Kelchner, had a splendid case 
(law case) to present which slightly 
overbalanced efforts put forth by the 
attorney for the defense, Mr. Harry 
Stone. Both produced powerful wit- 
nesses whose testimony was conven- 
iently directly opposite. Because of 
the partiality shown by Judge Behney, 
and we do not wish to criticize the 
court, it was intimated that he had 
visited the home of the defendant 
several times and had come away 
each time with a twinkle in his eye. 
However, when the jury retired with 
the evidence, liquid and otherwise, 
and considered it fiom all angles, 
they returned and indicated by ac- 
tions as well as words that the de- 
fendant was guilty as charged in the 
Nth degree. Sentence was pronounc- 
ed and the court adjouned. 

Those taking part in the trial were: 

Judge — J. Bruce Behney. 
Defendant— Carl W. Sloat. 
Atty. for the Defense — Harry H. 
Stone. 

Atty. for the Commonwealth — Albert 

H. Kelchner. 
Clerk — Paul Moser. 
Court Cryer — Harry H. Payne. 
Witnesses — Uhl R. Kuhn. 

Louis Candano. 

Glenn E. Bendigo. 

Paul Hunter. 

Elmer A. Keiser. 
Court Interpreter — Dominic Bovino. 

Due to the midyear examinations 
no program was prepared for the 
evening of February 4th. The pro- 
gram for February 11th consists of a 
joint session with the Clionian Liter- 
ary Society. 



Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Studio and Home Portraits 
Films Printed and Developed 
Promptly 



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Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
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PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

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Lebanon, Pa. 



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PHOTOGRAPHS OF QUALITY 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

36 North Eighth Street, LEBANON, PA. 



I 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, February 17, 1927 



Kampus Kracks 



EXTRA ! ! ! 

New Men's Dorm added to the col- 
lege! Marshall Hall now a part of 
the campus! Dedicataion in the near 
future. 



There is a 

Rumor on 

The campus that 

We are 

To have a 

New 

Concrete Stadium 
Next fall. 
Maybe the alumni 
Are getting 
Their heads 
Together 111 



Students will not occupy their reg- 
ular seats in the dining hall today. 
The Checker Club left on a short 
trip. 



Willie Wiseman says that one 
should always use the gutteral voice 
for telling risque jokes. 



Ruth Light: Have you heard the 
"Butcher Song"? 

Mim Hershey: "No. What is it? 

Ruth: "Butcher arms around me 
honey!" 



J. Allen Klinger studied at least 
once, week before last. 



Joe Bruno: Gentlemen prefer 
blondes — they get dirty sooner. 
Chubby: Yeah? 

Joe: Right. But I like brunettes, 
myself — they're dirtly already ! ! ! 



Prof. Bennett: Archeologists have 
recently found a wonderful myth in 
the old baths at Rome. 

"Red" Keiser: I hope they excused 
themselves and left. 



Europe will pay off her entire debt 
—if America will lend her the money 
with which to do it! 



Hope Hampton, screen star (home 
from Paris): "All well dressed 
French women are Americans." 



Baltimore Newsboy: Extra paper, 
mister, extra paper! 

Smitty (on basket ball trip): All 
right, kid, I'll take an extra one if 
you've got it. 



There are more than sixty million 
reasons why man will never under- 
stand the opposite six. Right — all of 
them are women. 



Waiter: Tea, milk, or coffee? 
Slightly under: How many guesh- 
es? 



Papa Calabrese spent the past 
week-end visiting the family in Tow- 
er City. 



Stranger: What's going on over 
there in that big building — a riot? 

Senior: No. Just girls' basket ball 
practice. 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 

CLASSES HAVE BEGUN 



(Continued from Page 1) 

The classes must be attended by all 
Freshmen and Sophomore girls, and 
may be attended by girls of the 
upper classes. It is interesting to see 
that almost every girl is taking ad- 
vantage of this orivilege. We believe 
this is sufficient interest to deserve 
more provisions for this valuable 
course in our curriculum. Probably 
it will be soon that girls will have 
the same chances for physical de- 
velopement as men now do. 



CAST FOR JUNIOR 

PLAYS ANNOUNCED 

(Continued from Page 1) 
very typical of Shaw, completes the 
program. 

The play committee consisted of 
J. Bruce Behney (chairman), Esther 
Walmer, and Bernice Hoover. 
The casts are as follows: 
1LE 

Captain Keeney, Henry Y. Brubaker 

Mrs. Keeney Alice Kindt 

The Steward Raymond Koch 

Ben, The Cabin Boy 

Harvey Nitrauer 

Slocum, Second Mate 

Clifford Singlev 

Joe, The Harpooner, Milford Knisley 

Stage Manager Henry Y. Brubaker 

Properties Raymond Koch 

THE WELL-REMEMBERED VOICE 

Mrs Don Viola Wolfe 

Mr. Don Millard J. Miller 

Dick___ J. Bruce Behney 

Laura Bernice Hoover 

Major Uhl R. Kuhn 

Roger W. Daniel Pugh 

Stage Manager J. Bruce Behne> 

Properties Millard J. Miller 

THE DARK LADY OF THE 
SONNETS 
Prologue by Benetta Burrier 

Beefeater Elmer A. Keiser 

Shakespeare H. Darkes Albright 

Queen Elizabeth Esther Walmer 

The Dark Lady Nelda Spatz 

Stage Manager H. Darkes Albright 

Properties Elmer Keiser 

Costumes Nelda Spatz. 



'CHAT BOOK" MAKES 

FIRST APPEARANCE 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Miss Alice Kindt told of the beginn- 
ings of tne "Chat Book" and traceu 
its history down to the time it was 
ready to be placed in the students' 
nanus. John W. Beattie supplement- 
ed the remarks of Miss Kindt with the 
purpose and principles of the "Chat 
.book" and gave the students an in- 
sight in tne workings of the Writers' 
Club. As a canvass of the chapel 
was made, Miss Caroi Brinser kept 
those in atendance well supplied with 
good humor by her campus cracks. 

For a long time, many persons have 
lamented tne lack of a proper publi- 
cation lor the expression of self in 
the form of essays or verse. "La Vie 
Coiiegienne" supplied an outlet for 
some, but there were still fertile and 
imaginative minds which conceived 
ideas not in accordance with the gen- 
eral "newsy" spirit of the college 
paper. All these ideas were develop- 
ed and brought to the attention of a 
comparatively few of the students. 
Ambitions remained unsatisfied, and 
so when another paper was mention- 
ed, the plan met with instant and un- 
amious approval. "The Chat Book" 
resulted and every member of the 
Writers' Club is justly proud of its 
achievement. 

The Writers' Club is a young but 
growing, campus activity. Every 
two weeks its members meet to pre- 
sent and discuss the articles produced 
during their leisure time. Too much 
credit cannot be given to Dr. Paul A. 
W. Wallace for his critical aid and 
inspiration. The club is truly great- 
ful that they may have the great 
opportunity to be under such a cap- 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



able critic. The students may look 
for great things from this "baby" 
organization. 



LADIES AUXILIARYS' 
BIRTHDAY ANNIVERSARY 



(Continued from page 1) 
ard then turned the program over 
to Mrs. Mary C. Green, the chairman 
of the program committee. The fol- 
lowing delightful program was ren- 
dered: 

Intermezzo in E flat Brahm 

Golliwog's Cake Walk Debussy- 
Waltz in A flat Brahm 

Miss Ruth Engle, head of the 
Conservatory 
I Know Where A Garden Grows__ 

Densmoie 

Down Here Brake 

Mrs. Edith Frantz Mills, of the 
Voice Department 

The Congo Vachael Lindsay 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, of the 
English Department 
A Valentine Pantomime. 
Misses Mabel Hafer, '28 and Benetta 
Burrier, '28 accompanied by Miss 

Grace Daniels, '28. 
The program was well received, al! 
of the numbers responding to encores. 
Following the program, the Refresh- 
ment Committee with Mrs. Samuel 
C. Saylor as chairman, served dainty 
refreshments. 

The party was one of the pleasant 
social gatherings of the friends of the 
college. The unselfish objective of 
the auxiliary is to beautify the three 
girls' dormitories on the campus and 
to subscribe to the college endowment 
fund. On this particular occasion 
each guest brought a bag of coins, 
resulting in a total contribution of 
more than fifty dollars. 



INTERIOR DECORATING 
OFFERED TO THE CO-EDS 



(Continued from Page 1) 
the ensuing month. In his first lec- 
ture Mr. Frantz traced the origin and 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

Annville _ Pa. 

Bowling and Billiards 



development of furniture from its 
earliest beginnings to the period of 
the American Revolution. He em- 
phasized the romance of furniture 
and its significance to society. A 
number of periods and designers 
well discussed, including Jacobean, 
William and Mary, Queen Anne, 
Chippendale, Hepplewhite, Adams, 
Sheraton and Duncan Phyfe designs. 

Mr. Frantz is a reliable, well in- 
formed authority who has devoted 
considerable time to extensive re- 
search in the field of furniture. The 
Lebanon Valley College girls appreci- 
ate his ability, his generosity, and 
the added honor of being pioneer 
students in a course of this type. It 
is a course which meets a real need, 
aiming to give future homemakers 
a more comprehensive knowledge of 
intelligent interior decorating, choice 
of draperies, selection and correct 
arrangement of furniture. Mr. Frantz 
hopes to make the course entirely 
applicable by having the students 
arrange model apartments in the Leb- 
anon store after the completion of the 
lectures. 




» from your old 

shoes -We repair 
®*\ them lots of wear 




ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR 
COMPANY 



Fine 

Home-Made 
Candies 

LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 

A fine place to treat your 
friend 

TSCHUDY'S 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. 0. Bldg. 



West Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



NO 



DROPS 
USED 

DR. HARRIS GRUMAN 
Eyesight Specialist — Optometrist 

GLASSES REPAIRED 
40 N. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and, SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

UNION EMBLEM CO VALLEY^TRUSST^ BUILDING 
Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS — TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery- 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants', 
A.rt Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



r 



DO YOU FAVOR 
A POINT SYSTEM? 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



BEAT ALBRIGHT 
TOMORROW NIGHT 



VOLUME II 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1927 



NUMHKR 9 



F. AND M, VICTIM, 
GEWSBURG VICTOR 

Blue and White Cagers Strike 
Slump in Battle 
with G-burg 

F. & M. GAME THRILLING 



In a "free for all" battle Lebanon 
Valley took the count of Franklin & 
Marshall basketball quintet Wednes- 
day evening by the score of 42-23. 
The game was one of great interest. 
The last half especially was very 
nerve racking for Lebanon Valley 
came from behind and decisively 
outplayed F. & M. In the first half 
F. & M. completely outplayed the lo- 
cal team due to the fact that the 
Blue and White was hot able to ad- 
vance the ball to the vicinity of the 
goal. Bad passing was prevalent in 
the first half which coupled to Leba- 
non Valley's inaccurate shots at the 
basket left F. & M. to accomplish 
much for their side of the victory. 
The score at halves was 23-15 with 
F. & M. in the lead. The forwards 
of F. & M. were exceptionally good 
at long shots and performed their 
(Continued on Page 4) 



QUARTET OF WORLD 
FAME TOENTERTAIN 

Star Course Pleased to Present 
Adanac Male Quartet as 
Last Attraction 



On Tuesday, March 8th, the Stu- 
dents and friends of the college will 
be privileged to hear one of the best 
male quartets in the country. It is 
recognized throughout the United 
States and Canada as one of the fore- 
most male singing organizations of 
the day. 

The Adanac Quartet, which will ap- 
pear under the auspices of the Star 
Course, was organized in the Domin- 
ion of Canada, and both in Canada 
and in this country critics have un- 
qualifiedly endorsed the singing of 
this company, praising the remark- 
able organ-like tonal quality of the 
(Continued on Page 2) 



ASHCRAFT AND SHELL 
SPEAKERS IN CHAPEL 

Both are Educational Workers 
Connected with the United 
Brethren Church 



The college was honored last wee> 
by the visits of two prominent de- 
nominational educators, the Rever- 
end William E. Schell, A.M., D.D.. 
and the Reverend C. E. Ashcraft. 
B.D., Ph.D. Dr. Schell is General 
Secretary of Education in the United 
Brethren church with offices at Day- 
ton, Ohio. He came in the general 
interest of the college, to survey its 
work and to catch something of its 
spirit. After addressing the entire 
student body in the chapel exercises, 
he interviewed students individually, 
endeavoring to advise them as to 
their life's work. Dr. Schell was 
greatly pleased with the atmosphere 
of our campus and its general tone — 
moral, spiritual, intellectual, and fi- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



LADIES AUXILIARY 

VISITS SOUTH HALL 



The members of the Ladies' 
Auxiliary have become fairy god- 
mothers to the girls of the college. 
They have invaded the parlor of 
South Hall, leaving them the more 
beautiful after the invasion. Lux- 
urious portieres of rich velvet in 
soft brown and restful green were 
hung in the two spacious door- 
Ways. The long parlor windows 
are more stately than ever in new 
curtains with over drapes of 
brown and old gold. The South 
Hall girls feel, as girls have al- 
ways felt towards fair godmoth- 
ers, appreciative and very grate- 
ful. 



THURSDAY MORNING 

WAS KALO MORNING 

Kalozetean Literary Society took 
over the chapel exercises Thursday 
morning, February 17, and presented 
an enjoyable entertainment. Music, 
somehow, holds the interest of every- 
body, especially when it is good md- 
sic. The soft, flowing tones of a sax- 
ophone cause us to sway back and 
forth, making us wish we were on a 
dance floor, particularly when a mas- 
ter of the instrument, as Kennedy un- 
doubtedly is, plays it. A good quar- 
tet always gets the applause. So it 
was Thursday morning, an encore 
being sung. Vocal numbers appeal 
to us in a certain way, but the gen- 
tle, stirring tones of a violin strike 
(Continued on Page 4) 



LAST TRIBUTE PAID 
TO ALFRED HERSHEY 

Many Seniors Attend Funeral 
of Former Classmate 
and President 



Funeral services for Alfred N. Her- 
shey were held in the United Breth- 
len church at Hummelstown, on Mon- 
day, February 21, at 2:30 P. M., with 
Rev. G. W. Hallman presiding. Rev. 
C. A. Snavely. of Harrisburg, read 
Lhe Scripture, and prayer was offered 
by Rev. H. F. Rhoads, of Highspire. 
The college quartette consisting of 
Mentzer, Brewbaker, Pugh, and Oyer 
gave several well rendered selection?. 
The obituary was read by Rev. A. E. 
Lehman, of Harrisburg. Rev. S. C. 
Enck preached the sermon, and Dr 
G. D. Gossard gave a very fine ad- 
dress. 

The pallbearers were: Raymond 
Wood, Floyd Lichtenberger, Rodney 
Kreider, Milford Knisley, J. Luverne 
Snavely, and Carl Bachman, all of 
whom were close friends of Mr. Her- 
shey during his three and one-half 
years at college. There were many 
flowers, all of which were very beau- 
tiful. Almost every organization on 
the campus paid their respect by 
sending flowers. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



GOSSARDS' ENTERTAIN 
SENIOR GIRLS AT TEA 

Junior Girls also Guests of 
President and Wife 
on Wednesday 

Mrs. George D. Gossard was hosetss 
to the girls of the Senior class on 
Wednesday afternoon, February 
twenty-third, and to the girls of the 
Junior class on March second. Both 
affairs assumed the form of afternoon 
teas. It is in accordance with a 
charming, well-established tradition 
that the girls of the college are an- 
nually invited to tea at the Presi- 
dent's home. 

The Senior tea, being the day after 
Washington's Birthday, was staged in 
a Colonial atmosphere. Appropriate 
decorations included American flags 
and the historic cherry tree. The 
program rendered by class cousins of 
the Seniors ieatured Revolutionary- 
days. Quaint Martha Washington cos- 
tumes were worn by the performers 
Their program consisted of a vocal 
duet by the Overly sisters, a reading 
by Mildred Umholtz, a piano duet by 
by Grace Daniels and Violet Krone 
a solo by Winifred Peck, and the 
minuet danced by Mildred Lane, Ed- 
na Gorski, Janet Miller, Winifred 
Peck, Mary Overly, Arabella Overly. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



GLEE CLUB OPENS 
SEASON AT READING 

Large Audience Hears Club 
Present Their Initial 
Program 



The Glee Club of Lebanon Valley 
College opened its schedule on Sat- 
urday evening, Februarv 19, in 
Reading before a large audience. The 
club appeared in the Y. M. C. A. au- 
ditorium under the auspices of the 
Salem United Brethren Church of 
that city. On the following Monday 
evening the club gave the second 
concert in the Knigihts of Malta 
Temple in Lebanon. This concert was 
also well attended. 

Due to the death of the president 
of the club, Mr. Alfred Hershey, the 
members were under a great handi- 
cap in both concerts, for Mr. Hershey 
(Continued on Page 3) 



DELPHIANS STAGE HISTORICAL DRAMA 

IN COMMERATION OF FIFTH BIRTHDAY 

"Peggy Shippen" an Original Drama Concerning the Life of 
Benedict Arnold; and His Treason 
Successfully Presented. 



MANY ALUMNI AND FRIENDS ATTEND ANNIVERSARY 



MRS. O. EL REYNOLDS 

CONFINED TO BED 



Mrs. O. Edgard Reynolds, wife 
of Prof. Reynolds of the Educa- 
tion Department, has been con- 
fined to her home due to serious 
illness for more than two weeks. 
She is greatly missed, especially 
by the college girls who know her 
as their loyal Sunday school 
teacher. They all hope that her 
recovery will be rapid. 



ILLUSTRATED LECTURE 
BY REVEREND KNIPP 



The Reverend J. Edgar Knipp, of 
Baltimore, one of our most capable 
representatives in the United Breth- 
ren missionary field of Japan, honor- 
ed the college by a brief visit on 
February twenty-seventh and twenty- 
eighth. On Sunday morning he' ad- 
dressed the college girls Sunday 
School class in the absence of their 
teacher, Mrs. 0. Edgar Reynolds. He 
brought the message of the hour in 
the church services of the morning 
and presented remarkable lantern 
slides of the old Island Empire and 
the new Japanese Republic in the 
evening. On Monday morning he ad- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



INTERESTING RECITAL 

BY MUSIC STUDENTS 



A Student Rectital was held by the 
Conservatory of Music of Lebanon 
Valley College in Engle Hall, Tues- 
day, February 15. The program con- 
sisted of numbers from all the de- 
partments of music except the 
violin. It is interesting • to know 
that the Conservatory is growing, for 
there were three new people to make 
their debut. 

The program was as follows: 
"Fairy Frolic," (Williams), Alice 
Richie; "A Little March," (Burbank), 
Helen Kreider; "First Study in 
Chords," (Addison), Catharine Kreid- 
er; "Elves at Play," (Terry), Helen 
Butterwick; "Curious Story," (Hel- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



ASHCRAFT SPEAKER 
AT JOINT-SESSION 

Dr. Ashcraft of Bonebrake 
Seminary gives Stirring 
Address 



Friday evening, February 18, the 
Delphian Literary Society, for the 
fifth time in its history, entertained 
faculty and friends with its Anniver- 
sary program. For a few weeks there 
had been whispering and hustling 
among the Delphians. Friday even- 
ing showed that all the hurry and 
hard work had not been wasted, for 
this indeed proved the banner year 
for Delphian. 

The first part of the program in- 
cluded the invocation, the president's 
welcome, and a group of songs by 
Pear Lindenmuth. Lola Desenber 
one of the society's alumni, offered 
the invocation. Florence Dundore, in 
a few well chosen words, explained 
the main feature of the program and 
by her manner and words of wel- 
come, prepared the audience for the 
play which followed. Pearl Linden- 
continued on Page 3) 



GO-EDS DROP OPENER 
TO URSINUS GIRLS 

Girls Debating Team Lacks the 
Support of Student 
Body 



A joint session of the Y. W. C. A. 
and the Y. M. C. A was held in En- 
gle Hall, Sunday, Feb. 20th. Leroy 
Fegley had charge of the service. 
Benetta Burrier furnished a special, 
vocal number with Nelda Spatz as 
accompanist. 

President Gossard then introduced 
Dr. Ashchaft, of Bonebrake Seminary, 
who brought the message of the 
evening in a deeply original manner. 
His subject "Paying the Price" pre- 
sented new avenues of thought to* 
wards the ever new yet ever old vi- 
sion of ideals. He not only compared 
ideals but also pointed out the trails 
by which they can be reached. As 
one of the most inspiring and 
thought-provoking addresses, of the 
year, its influence upon the campus 
has already been marked. Altogeth- 
er the hour was very pleasantly and 
profitably spent. 

Dr. Ashcraft delivered seTferal 
other messages of merit and power 
during the time that he spent on the 
campus. Most certainly the silently 
expressed wish of not a few must 
have been that he should come this 
way again. 



Saturday evening at eight o'clock 
the Girls' Debating Teams opened 
their debating season, a new adven- 
ture in the history of L. V. C. for the 
co-eds. The initial debate was held 
with one of the strongest teams in 
the State — Ursinus College. Although 
the home team realized defeat was 
almost certain, they kept their poise 
and not once did they disregard the 
fact that if deafeat must come, it will 
come only after every womanly ef- 
fort has been put forth to avoid it. 
The chairman for the occasion, Mr. 
A. K. Mills, surely did help much to 
keep up the morale of the team by 
his suitable witty remarks. The 
question "Resolved, That the United 
States should cancel the War Debts 
owed to it by the Allied Nations" was 
(Continued on Page 4) 



FRENCH TEA PARTY 

IN NORTH HALL 



Mrs. Mary C. Green, assisted by 
her daughter, Miss Yvonne Green, 
was a charming hostess to her 
class in conventional French on 
Monday afternoon, February twen- 
ty-eighth, at a French tea in North 
Hall parlor. All conversation 
was in French; decoratoins, games 
and refreshments all helped to 
a truly Parisian atmosphere. The 
guests were enchanted by the nov- 
elty and originality of the affair, 
and have concluded that they have 
had a very educational experience 
Mrs. Green plans to arrange a 
French tea every two weeks dui- 
ing the spring months. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1927 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 
WALTER L. NESS, ; 27 
Associate Editors 

MYRA 0. SHEAFFER, '27 MARY McLANACHAN, '27 

Conservatory RUTH STRUBHAR, '2«J 

AthWics _ - - ELMER REISER, '2i- 

Clio _ _ _ _ ALICE KINDT, '2S 

Delphian"."-""" KATHRYN YOUNG, '27 

Kalo __ LAWRENCE DERICKSON, "O 

Philo J - BRUCE BEHNEY, '28 

General" EDNA C GRAHAM, ''28 

DARKES ALBRIGHT ,'28 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WADE S. MILLER, '27 

Circulation Manager CLARENCE ULRICH, '27 

Associate Business Manager RAYMOND KOCH, '28 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



f 



EDITORIALS 



IN MEMORIAM 

Again the grim victor death has visited our campus 
and has taken with him one who was very dear to us. 
Alfred Nissley Hershey son of Rev. and Mrs. L Moyer 
Hershey passed into the great beyond leaving behind him 
many friends and admirers, who shall long cherish mem- 
ories of his beloved kindness. 

We the students and faculty of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege wish to convey our sincerest sympathies to the 
family and friends of the deceased. 



THE POINT SYSTEM 

The point system which is working on a large percentage 
of the campuses of United States, is a system whereby every 
office in any club or organization is equivalent to a certain 
number of points and no student may carry more than a specific 
number. This would open,the door to many more office holders 
than we find at present, for those with outstanding ability who 
attempt to function in so many organizations would be limited. 
An individual could not be president of a large organization 
and hold an important office in another club. This gives the 
other student a chance. There are many hidden abilities on 
every campus and often becoming a leader in some organiza- 
tion will bring his ability to the front. 

There is not a person on the campus who would dare ven- 
ture to say that we do not need something to Change this un- 
fortunate situation on our campus. With no less than 30 organ- 
izations and clubs, it is easily seen that a few capable individ- 
uals will bear the majority of the offices unless something wil 
check it otherwise. And what would be better than a point sys 
tern? Again, all realize that it is impossible for anyone to be 
equally interested in two or more organizations. That individ- 
ual may succeed splendidly in both, but if he could concentrate 
all his time and work in one organization, the weight of that 
organization would not stop within the campus- What wouk 
our organizations and clubs portray if they had as their leaders 
the hidden talent of individuals who were conscientious anr 
vitally interested in their work and who could give all of their 
time to its advancement? Our campus would be wide awakt 
if such were the conditions. Some may say that it is a system 
for large colleges and universities, but the small campus is the 
one on which it is most needed. For it is on the small campus 
where all know the able and talented students and where all 
organizations covet his leadership that we find a few bearing 
the whole burden- 

Some may say, "Yes, it is a lovely ideal to talk about but 
that is as far as it would go. Will you say THAT when 
hundreds of colleges have taken the steps and instituted such a 
system? We dare say not one of you would say that Lebanon 
Valley cannot do what other schools have done. It is not a dif- 
ficult thing to do. All that is necessary after everyone on the 
campus is willing to see a system like this is to have a commit- 
tee work on the number of points to be given for each office 
and the total number permissable to any student. What would 
be the results? They are clearly seen. We would not have any 
student overworked with extra-curricular activities as we find 
them now on the campus, and moue students would be given a 
chance for leadership and experience- There are many who be- 
lieve that extra-curricuJar work is half of your training at col- 
lege and if that is true should we not try to train more along 
that line? We are debarring some from this vital experience 
as long as we permit one student to hold more than one presi 
dencyor to hold a presidency and several other offices in our 
organizations. We BELIEVE in giving to every student all we 
can and all that college life should give him- Let us do what 
we believe. 



College Calendar 



March 3 

6:00 P.M. — Class in Interior Deco- 
rating by Mr. Frantz. 

6:10 P.M. — Ministerium. 

7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

8:00 P.M.— Debate: Schuylkill Neg- 
ative Girls vs. Lebanon Valley Af- 
firmative Girls at Annville. 

8:00 P.M.— Debate: Schuylkill Af- 
firmative Girls vs. Lebanon Valley 
Girls at Reading. 

March 4 

7:00 P.M.— Albright Girls vs. Leba- 
non Valley Girls at Lebanon. 

8:00 P.M.- -Albright Varsity v~ 
Lebanon Valley Varsity at Lebanon 
March 6 

5:45 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Devotional 
Meeting. 

March 7 

4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M.— Writers' Club. 
9:00 P.M.— Men's Senate. 

March 8 

4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer Meet- 
ing. 

March 9 

4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board 
Meeting. 

6:15 P.M.— L. Club Entertainment. 

March 10 
6:10 P.M.— Ministerium. 
7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 
8:00 P.M.— College Band. 

March 11 
7:00 P.M. — Regular sessions of the 
literary societies. 

March 12 
2:30 P.M.— Millersville State Nor- 
mal School Girls vs. Lebanon Valley 
Girls at Millersville. 

March 13 
5:45 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Devotional 
Service. 

March 14 

4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M.— Reader's Club. 
9:00 P.M.— Men's Senate. 

March 15 
4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer Meeting. 

March 16 
4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board 
Meeting 



GLEE CLUB OPENS 

SEASON AT READING 

(Continued from Page 1) 



was a leading tenor on the club ami 
sang second tenor on the quartette 
As it was practically impossible to 
completely organize a new quartette 
in the short time afforded, the pro- 
gram was rearranged and the quar- 
tette, with Mr. Russell Oyer filling 
Mr. Hershey's place, only appeared 
once, but received a hearty encore 
Besides the difficulty caused the clu u 
by this vacancy, a feeling of sadness 
pervaded the members which could 
not be hidden entirely during the 
rendition of both concerts. 

However, favorable comment on 
trie quality of the program cairk 
from many sources, and several in- 
dividuals who have heard the club 
in former years stated that the cho- 
rus numbers are the best in its his- 
tory. This speaks well for both the 
club and its director, Prof. George 
Rogers, who have been laboring un- 
der many difficulties all year. 

Considerable appreciation was 
shown the club for its appearance in 
the Sunday Scholl and Church serv- 
ices in the United Brethren Church 
in Reading on Sunday morning in 
which it rendered several selections. 

The schedule will be resumed on 
March 11, when the club leaves on 
the annual trip to New Park, Dallas- 
town, Baltimore and Washington. 



Alumni Notes 



Every Literary Society Anniver- 
sary brings back to us the old 
"grads." Among those who returned 
1o celebrate Delphian's fifth birthday 
were: Lola Desenberg '25, Isabella 
Smith '25, Kathryn Nisley '25, Ivn 
Weaver '27, Francis Friedley '27, 
Mary MacDougal '26, Olga Smith 
Edith Geyer '25, Elsie Clark '25, Ver- 
na Seitzinger '25, Madeline Hark '29. 
and Margaret Stern '28. 

Edwin Harold White, A.B., '17. 
went overseas during the late war. 
Upon his return he was employed by 
the Aetna Life Insurance Company of 
Hartford, Conn. After serving with 
that company at Pittsburgh, Pa., and 
Huntington, W. Va., he was called U 
the home office at Hartford where he 
was put in charge of a large group 
of men. About two months ago he 
was honored by being elected an As- 
sistant General Agent with officers 
in Philadelphia. While here he took 
part in athletics, was a leader alonp 
Christian lines, and a general leader 
with the student body. This paper 
extends congratulations to him for 
<he new honors which have come te 
him. 

Caroll R. Daugherty, A.B , '21 
taught for several years after gradu- 
ation in Mercersberg Academy. Later 
he entered the graduate school of the 
University of Pennsylvania to study 
history and sociology. About tw^ 
weeks ago, at the end of the first 
semester he received the Doctor of 
Philosophy Degree. 



QUARTET OF WORLD 

FAME TO ENTERTAIN 

(Continued from Page 1) 



ensemble work and the excellent in- 
divual artistry. 

Splendid as the quartet is in the 
rendition of numbers of genuine 
musical worth, ranging from grand 
opera selections to eld Scotch ballads, 
it also ends in the presentation of 
songs of a humorous character. As a 
matter of fact, the program is cal- 
culated to bring many an uproarious 
laugh. The humorous musical mon- 
ologs of H. Ruthven McDonald, man- 
ager of the quartet, are always a fea- 
ture of the program. 

The Star Course Is very anxious to 
have a crowded house. You make 
possible our securing of the best tal- 
ent by your support. Have it said 
that you have heard one of the best 
quartets in Annville. You can do 
that for the small sum of fifty cents. 
We are lowering the price so that 
every person can have the oppor- 
tunity. 



SEXTETTE CONQUERS 
GETTYSBURG GO-EDS 



Nell Raubenstein Plays Stellar 
Game, Scorina: Twenty- 
eight Points 



Saturday, February 19, the Leba- 
non Valley sextette conquered again! 
The co-eds defeated the Gettysburg 
team by a score of 47-17. Nell Ra- 
benstine starred for the home team 
scoring twenty-eight points of the to- 
tal score. 
Line-up: 

Lebanon Valley Gettysburg 

Rabenstine (Capt.) F. Schussler 

Lane F. Fisher 

J. Miller C. Longanecker 

I. Miller S. C. M. Richard? 

Fencil G. Fogel 

Mark G. E. Richards (Capt.) 

Total score — Lebanon Valley, 47- 
Gettysburg, 17. Substitutions— Myer 
March, Cochrane, Borden. Referee, 
Mayer, Harrisburg. 



COLLEGIATE CIRCLES 

None of us is so narrow that our 
circle of interest is confined to our 
own Lebanon Valley Campus. We 
are all interested in what other col- 
lege students are doing and thinking 
on the campuses. 



The following paragraph appeared 
in "The Bucknellian:" "Inter-class 
Council received astonishing infor- 
mation on Monday night, February 7, 
when Frank Sedlack, '30 who had 
been reported for visiting the College 
Inn during the forbidden, hours, con- 
fessed that he never read the Buck- 
nellian and therefore was not famil- 
iar with the new Frosh rules. It 
seems that Sedlack did not know that 
such a paper was published. He was 
compelled to wear a sign for the bal- 
ance of the week to remind him that 
the Bucknellian is printed to be 
read." Certainly every L. V. Fresh- 
man reads the "La Vie Collegienne" 
and could not be charged for not 
knowing of the existence of our 
school paper. 



The "Albright Bulletin" contained 
this startling head line: Sudent Gov- 
ernment Proposal Offered To Men 
Rejected Until Status Quo Is 
Changed— Decide To Wait Until 
Something More Definite is Offered — 
Correct Kind of Government Will Be 
Welcomed — Plenty of Discussion Of- 
fered Among Students — Time is Ripe 
is Claim. According to the article 
following this head line the men of 
Albright College are quite aroused 
over this new issue. "A short discus- 
sion under the direction of the presi- 
dents of the upper classes took place 
(in chapel) with a number of spirited 
arguments, revealing the fact that 
there is some support for the idea." 



"The Gettysburgian" informs us 
that "The Radio Club" of their 
campus elected its new semester of- 
ficers. If new radios are continually 
being erected in the men's "dorm" at 
L. V. C, it is probably that the "ra- 
dio fans" may band together for the 
extension of work in the radio world. 
Evidently Gettysburg has a live-wire 
club. "At the present time the club 
members are busy building a trans- 
mitter, and expect to have it in oper- 
ation within the next week. This 
transmitter is in the tower of Glatfel- 
ter Hall and will be operated from 
the Radio Club room. The club is 
planning to relay messages for the 
members of the college." 



Day by day girls' glee Clubs are 
becoming more important and are 
seeking to be recognized. The girls 
at Bucknell have about the same 
opinion as our own L. V. C. Co-eds. 
Their club has arranged for a small 
tour. Why not? Here's just a part 
of the article: "The Girls' Glee Club 
has been rending the air about the 
Music School so much lately that 
queries have been received concern- 
ing its intentions. The concensus of 
opinion seems to be that they are 
wasting their efforts within the con- 
fines of Miss Pine's studio, and ought 
to strive for bigger and better halls 
and audiences." 



Since the lecture "In Defense of 
the American Constitution" was de- 
livered by Hon. Clinton N. Howard 
in the United Brethren Church of 
Annville, everyone has been thinking 
more seriously than ever of the pos- 
sibility of repealing the 18th amend- 
ment. Here's students' opinion: 
Concerning the student referendum 
on the Volstead law, the Chicago 
Post says, "A student referendum on 
various phases of the wet and dry 
controversy, in which votes were cast 
by 7,800 students, representing 37 
American universities, presents as i ts 
most significant result, the fact th** 
only 937 students or 12 per cent f a ' 
vored repeal of the Eighteenth 
Amentment." 



r 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1927 



PAGE THREE 



pFXPHIANS STAGE 
HISTORICAL DRAMA 
IN COMMEMORATION 
OF FIFTH BIRTHDAY 

(Continued from Page 1) 



muth has appeared on the Lebanon 
Valley stage many occasions during 
her college life and has never yet 
disappointed an audience. On Fri- 
day evening, she was at her best. 
Her three selections were rendered 
with technique and expression. 

The second part of the program 
consisted of the historical drama, 
"Peggy Shippen" written by M. K. 
Wallace of the English department 
The curtain rose upon a colonial 
drawing room, and immediately the 
audience was carried back to the time 
of the Revolutionary War, and the 
events in which all American take so 
much pride. Again, as many years 
ago, Peggy Shippen, the belle of 
Philadelphia, was advised by her par- 
ents — nay, ordered by her father — to 
turn away the brave General Bene- 
dict Arnold; for stories of his extrav- 
agence were afloat in the ctiy. .How- 
ever, the general had won her heart, 
and Mr. Shippen could not but relent 
in the face of her grief. When Peg- 
gy's heart was divided by love for 
her sweetheart and loyalty to her fa- 
ther, Mollie, the single hearted Qua- 
ker girl, who had been reared in 
the family, showed her that love 
should be given its way. Arnold's 
frank story of the reprimand he had 
been given by General Washington, 
served only to increase her sympathy 
and love for him. The wedding cere- 
mony, which was performed, was 
very characteristic of the times and 
very spectacular as result of the 
beautiful costuming. A few years 
later, Benedict Arnold and his wife 
and baby were in straitened circum- 
stances but Peggy's love never wav- 
ered. Arnold was worried. He had 
never forgiven the American cause 
for the treatment he received in its 
service. Moreover, he wanted money 
with which to make Peggy happy. 
Major Andre of the British Army, 
called secretly and Arnold, not with- 
out qualms of conscience, handed 
over the plans of the fortifications of 
West Point of which he was then in 
command and received gold in re- 
turn. Too late, he repented of his 
treason and Peggy entering the room 
found him in an excited condition. 
In amazement, she listened to the 
questions he put to her. "Would she 
always love him, no matter what hap- 
pened?" to each question, she an- 
swered in the affirmative, with the 
explanation that "I'll always love 
you, Arnold. We do not love people 
because they are good or strong or 
wise but — because they are them- 
selves." Suddenly, Saunders, Andre's 
attendant, burst into the room with 
the news that Andre had been cap- 
turned with the treasonable papers in 
his possession All was lost and Ar- 
nold's only safety lay in flight. Upon 
one person, he still relied and to that 
one he turned for comfort. But alas, 
hist last and worst deed had lost to 
him the love of his own faithful wife. 
Sadly and slowly, he passed from the 
room. Only when the sound of his 
footsteps had died away, and the 
door had closed upon him, did Peggy 
recall her promise to him. She would 
love him always because he was him- 
self. And so ended showing Peggy 
overwhelmed with the realization that 
s ^e loved her husband in spite of all 

Throughout the play, the audience 
^as held tense, the success of the 
drama was in large part due to the 
fine manner in which all the actors 
Played their roles. Darkes Albright 
Portrayed the character of Benedict 
Arnold in a most satisfactory man- 
n er, whether in yielding to tempta- 
tion of treason, or in making love to 
p eggy. Kathryn Young, as Peggy, 
P!ayed the part to perfectoin. It was 
a " emotional role, requiring real act- 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



CLIOS GIVE LOW- 
DOWN ON A CO-ED 

The evening of Feb. 25th was a 
cheerful evening in the annals of the 
Clionian Literary Society. The judi- 
ciary committee provided a program, 
interesting in every detail, under the 
name "A Day with a Co-ed." The 
following was the order of routine: 

Chapel Emma Shaeffer 

Sociology Eleanor Snoke 

Chemistry Elsie Reider 

Dinner Nelda Spatz 

English Gladys Knaub 

Harmony Fae Bachman 

Supper Nelda Spatz 

6-7:30 P.M. Mabel Brewbaker 

Everyone came away realizing that 
Co-ed life is a round of work and 
play that can't be beaten for "love 
nor money." 

After such a successful program 
the Clionian Literary Society wishes 
to congratulate the Delphian Liter- 
ary Society on the success of their 
fifth anniversary. 



GOSSARDS ENTERTAIN 

SENIOR GIRLS AT TEA 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Mildred Umholtz and Violet Krone. 

As usual, most delightful refresh- 
ments were served by the class cou- 
sins who entertained, with Janet Mii- 
ler and Violet Krone. The girls voted 
proving it a success, and one of the 
events on the social calendar whi h 
they look forward to each year. 

A week later, on March second, the 
Junior girls were entertained by the 
same hostess. A bewitching pro- 
gram was rendered by talented mem- 
bers of the Freshman class, followed 
by tea and the sort of social hour 
which college girls most thoroughly 
enjoy. 



INTERESTING RECITAL 

BY MUSIC STUDENTS 
(Continued from Page 1) 
ler), Elizabeth Bender; "Water 
Sprites," (Heller), Anna Butterwick; 
"Mammy's Sleepy Time Song," 
(Strickland), Josephine Yake; Sec- 
ond Mazurka," (Godard), Dorothy 
Holdeman; "Festival Prelude," 
(Reiff), Violet Krone; "I Attempt 
From Lovesickness," (Purcell), "Who 
Is Sylvia," (Schubert), Edgar Shroy- 
er; "Meditation," (Sturges), Grace 
Daniel; "Rain," (Curran), "The Lark 
Now Leaves His Watery Nest,' 
(Park), Winifred Peck; "Sous Bois," 
(Staub), Mildred Myers; "Prelude 
Heroic," (Faulkes), Mabel Yingst. 



ing, as did that of Arnold. From the 
picture of Peggy weeping at her fa- 
ther's orders, to Peggy standing like 
a statuette immune to the entreaties 
of Arnold, and finally heart-broken 
at the fall of the curtain, every ac- 
tion was engraved on the minds of 
the audience. Kind-hearted Mrs. 
Shippen played by Mary McLana- 
chan, and her conscientious husband, 
Wade Miller, will long be remember- 
ed, as well as Katherine Flinch- 
ba'ugh, as the tender Quaker girl, 
worrying about her sweetheart at 
Valley Forge. James Starr as Major 
Andre, Hilda Heller as the minister, 
and Elmer Keiser as Saunders por- 
trayed their roles admirably. 

The reception was given after- 
wards in the Alumni gymnasium, 
which had been transformed to an 
arbor of roses, under the able direc- 
tion of Louise Fencil. 

The Delphians take this opportu- 
nity to thank Miss Wallace for her 
untiring and intense efforts to mak<« 
the affair a success, to Professor 
Shenk for his aid in collecting' the 
contemporary historical material, and 
to all the boys, both those who assist- 
ed in the dramatization and those 
who assisted on the various commit- 
tees. 



K A I .( >S AX I) PHILOS 

IN JOINT-SESSION 

On Friday evening, February 25, a 
precedent was established which 
probably will continue throughout 
the coming years of Lebanon Valley. 
The Philokosmian Literary Society 
entertained the Kalozetean Literar\ 
Society in a joint session in Philo hall 
This is the first time in the history of 
the societies that this has ever ta- 
ken place, and is an indication of the 
growing feeling of friendship be- 
tween the societies. The program 
was entitled "Something Different" 
and the title was well chosen in more 
ways than one. 

In order to follow out the idea of 
"something different" the order of 
the program was entirely reversed 
and the audience partook of refresh- 
ments at the very beginning, and aft- 
er listening to the critic criticize a 
program not yet rendered, all enjoy- 
ed the numbers which accurred 
thereon. The entire program is as 
follows: 
Refreshments 

Critic's Report Charles Wise 

Where are the World's Wars Tak- 
ing Us? Roy Flock 

Selection Octette 

Trans-Oceanic Telephone 

: Homer Wiest 

Illustrated Lecture James Hazleton 

Selection Octette 

Lebanon Valley Infirmary — Paul Mos- 
er, Howard Allan, Dominic Calabres^, 
Luke Mimura, Uhl Kuhn. 
Social Hour 

There were many points of ex- 
treme interest in the program. Mr. 
Flook, in connection with his topic, 
reviewed the situation in Nicaragura 
and China and afforded the audience 
a chance to get a conception of the 
relation which these conflicts have on 
the progress of the world as a whole. 
The talk by Mr. Wiest, the Steinmetz 
of the Senior class, was interesting, 
not only because of the information 
he was able to give concerning the 
wonderful improvements made upon 
the telephonic system, but also be- 
cause of the fiashes of humor he was 
able to intersperse throughout his 
discussion. Mr. Hazleton related his 
experiences while traveling in 
France, Italy, Spain, Turkey, and Pal- 
estine. He added to his talk by hav- 
ing a large collection of trinkets 
which he picked up in these various 
countries. He related many thrilling 
experiences and also some which 
were quite humorous. He ended in a 
clever manner by announcing that 
the most extraordinary trinket which 
he ever picked up was one which he 
got in this country and after care- 
fully opening a package produced a 
freshman dink. The final number of 
the program produced the thrills. 

After the conclusion of the pro- 
gram the appetite of those in the au- 
dience again called for refreshments 
which were served again, this time 
more completely. A short social hour 
followed. 



ILLUSTRATED LECTURE 

REVEREND KNIPP 

(Continued from Page 1) 
dressed the assembled student body 
in chapel. 

Rev. Knipp is a graduate of Johns 
Hopkin University and of Bonebrake 
Theological Seminary. Having de- 
voted the past twenty-five years of 
his life to missionary service in Ja- 
pan, he speaks as an authority upon 
Far East development, difficulties, 
and projects. His plea for the Japan- 
ese is for less legislative discrimina- 
tion against Japanese immigrants to 
America. His vision of the future is 
one of international brotherhood and 
good-will, with "malice towards none 
and charity for all," a univeral fra- 



PHILOS HAVE SHORT 

AND VARIED PROGRAM 



A very short literary session wae 
held in Philo Hall on the evening of 
February 18. The program wa? 
shortened in order to allow the mem- 
bers of Philo to attend the Delphian 
anniversary program which was held 
later in the evening. The program 
later in the evening. The program 
which was rendered was as follows: 

Why Study Math.? Elias Kline 

Osteopathy Francis J. Marshall 

Piano Solo Robert Jacks 

Conditions in China Lloyd Weber 



The Philokosmian Literary Society 
is pleased to extend to the Delphian 
Literary Society its heartiest congrat- 
ualtions on her fifth anniversary. Her 
rapid growth and progress in her 
short history is recognized by Philo 
as an indication of earnest endeavor 
toward the upbuilding not only of 
the society but of the institution as 
a whole. 



LAST TRIBUTE PAID 

TO ALFRED HERSHEY 

(Continued from Page 1) 



The college was well represented 
at the funeral. The entire faculty 
was there in a body, the Glee Club 
was present in its entirety, and al- 
most every member of the Senior 
class was there. Many other students, 
as well as several members of the 
Kalozetean Literary Society, of 
which Mr. Hershey was a member, 
were present. 

During his stay here at Lebanon 
Valley Mr. Hershey had been very 
active in every phase of college life. 
He was a member of the Glee Club 
for four years, having been elected 
to the office of president for the last 
year. As an athlete he showed much 
skill in tennis, and was manager of 
that sport in his Junior year. His 
ability as an orator will always be 
remembered, for the record he made 
on the debating team last year. The 
Senior class recognized his ability as 
an executive, and elected him to be 
its president during the last semester 
of its college history. He also took 
an active part in the affairs of the 
Kalozetean Literary Society. 



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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1927 



Kampus Kracks 



"SUE" WISHERT: What kind of 
fruit do you like best? 

"MOSE" LIGHT: Dates with 
"Peaches!" 



Since 

The co-eds 
Have discovered 
That a 

Jack-the-hugger 
Is active 
Again, 

The Reading Transit Co. 
Is runing 
Extra cars 
Daily. 



PROF. DERRY: Give me an ex 
ample of something that develops 
with use. 

"MOONEY" AUNGST: Fiorelli's 



Dumb Dora would like to be a soda 
clerk. She thinks they lead such stir 
ring lives. 



Er-a 



FROSH (after first shave) 
how-how much? 

BARBER: Two dollars! 

FROSH: How's that? 

BARBER: I had to hunt for both 
the whiskers. 



"SOGGY": Your explanation of 
that problem was as clear as mud 

"CHIS" TRAUTMAN: Well, that 
covers the ground, doesn't it? 



JOHN ADAM BIXLER: You've got 
too much rouge on your lips. 

"KITTY": Well, the evening's 
young yet! 



REYNOLDS: Sparks, what is a 
dry dock? 

"PARSON": A physician who 
won't give out prescriptions. 



KULP (in conference): Vander- 
wall, you should try to write your 
themes so that even the most ignor- 
ant man might understand them. 

"NORM": Just which part don't 
you understand? 



KLINGER: D-d-did you ever meet 
a bobbed haired bandit? 

SENIOR: I'll say— I take one out 
almost every night. 



"RED" WEIGEL: Why did you 
close your eyes when you kissed me? 

"EGGIE": 'Cause I thought I wap 
in heaven, and who ever heard of a 
red-haired angel? 



Statistics show that 58.3 per cent 
of the students attending Lebanon 
Valley College are not pursuing any 
definite course with the exception 
that they are on a honeymoon. 



Hoy they did it in the good old days. 
(The following is an extract from the 

1925 Quittapahilla) 
The Ten Commandments of the Mo- 
hawker's Association. 

1 — When eating peas with a knife 

first mash the peas to avoid 
their getting away from you. 

2 — Don't drink coffee from a saucer 

(Use a plate — you get more). 

3 — Help yourself. Don't worry about 

other people at the table. 

4 — When reaching for something 

keep one foot on the floor. 

5 — When reaching for bread, don't 

use a fork — you may stab 
someone's hand. 

6 — The man who can sneeze his soup 

up on the chandelier is SOME 
sneezer. 

7 — Don't yell about side dishes. Your 

stomach has no partitions. 

8 — Soup should be "zipped" — not 

gargled. 

9 — It's no crime to trip the waiters. 
10— -Our Motto— "The Lord helps 

those who help themselves." 



THURSDAY MORNING 

WAS KALO MORNING 

(Continued from Page 1) 
the imagination In a way th:i 
voices cannot. Lewars and Shroyer 
make a good duet with the violin, and 
they certainly proved it that morn- 
ing. Speaking of syncopation at the 
piano, Ludwig absolutely is a master 
A normal person can hardly sit still 
when he plays that lively, snappy 
music. It fills everyone with pep and 
happiness. Unfortunately the time 
allowed was short, so that the boys 
had to omit some very fine number 
due to lack of time. 

Kennedy started the program with 
a solo on the saxophone, Ludwig at 
the piano. Next came the quartet 
consisting of Kiehner, Shroyer, Eb 
ersole, and Mentzer. Next in line 
were Lewars and Shrower in a violin 
duet, while last but not least came 
Ludwig, with, his own interpretation 
of popular numbers, at the piano. 

Last Friday night was a red lettp" 
night for the men's literary societie 
For the first time they held a joint 
session. At the invation of Philo 
Kalo visited its brother in Philo hall 
An entertainment of a unique char- 
acter was presented entitled, "Some 
thing Different," — and it was! 



CONGRATULATIONS 

The Kalozetean Literary Society 
wishes to congratulate the Delphiar 
Literary Society on the success of he* 
fifth anniversary. The society's wish- 
es are that our sister-society, may en 
ioy further the progress made by her 
during her five years as a literary so- 
ciety. 



4SHCRAFT AND SHELL 

SPEAKERS IN CHAPEI 

(Continued from Page 1) 
nancial. He will report his survey 
to his Board of Education. 

Dr. Ashcraft visited us several day? 
later, coming with the thought of 
Lebanon Valley College in its rela- 
tion to Bonebrake Theological Semi- 
nary. Being a professor of the Sem- 
inary, he was in position to interview 
those of our Seniors who anticipate 
Seminary work next year. On Sun- 
day, Dr. Ashcraft spoke in the morn- 
ing and evening services of the col- 
lege church, and in the Joint Session 
of the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C 
A. He spoke to' the students alone ir 
chapel on Monday and Tuesday 
mornings. Half a dozen of last year's 
graduates are now at the Seminary. 
Dr. Ashcraft found that a number 
expect to enter next fall. He, as well 
as Dr. Schell, was very enthusiastic 
about conditions as they found them 
here. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANT )ISI. 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET ,ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



F. AND M. VICTIM, 

GETTYSBURG VICTOR 

(Continued from Page 1) 



task of throwing them in free of the 
basket from all angles of the floor. 
Wheeler of Lebanon Valley, played 
a great defensive game although he 
suffered from a sprained ankle. Mil- 
ler who substituted for him played 
remarkably well in the same capac- 
ity. Piela got away to a good start 
in the second half and played a very 
brilliant game. Defensive and offen- 
sive he was a star and was very ac- 
curate in his shots. It was the fight- 
ing spirit of the home team for their 
school which made them put forth 
renewed effort to come back and 
forge ahead in the scoring lines 
Piela had the most points individually 
when he boosted his total to 24. F. 
& M. must be given credit for their 
exceptional floor work and decisive 
shooting at critical periods of thy 
game. 

Referee: Boyer of Lancaster. 



IN A SLUMP 



Gettysburg College cagemen pass- 
ed their way to a 58 to 19 victory 
over the Lebanon Valley quintet at 
Gettysburg Feb. 21. It was the worst 
defeat Lebanon Valley has tasted this 
vear. Gettysburg showed some fine 
exhibition passes, which, coupled with 
their fine shots, made from all angles 
of the floor, was too much for the 
local boys. Due to the fact that the 
participants of the Lebanon Vallev 
team were injured and unable to do 
their best, the score was thus ad- 
vanced to such an extent. All 
through the game Gettysburg lead 
in the scoring. At the end of the 
first half Gettysburg led 37 to 5. In 
the latter half the local team retal- 
iated with some better passing but 
failed to overcome the early lead 
Haller, of Gettysburg, was leading 
scorer with 12 field goals and 5 foul 
goals, while Gelbert, of Lebanon Vat- 
ley, led his team with 9 points. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

Annville _ Pa. 
Bowling and Billiards 



CO-EDS DROP OPENER 

TO URISINUS GIRLS 

(Continued from Page 1) 
defended by Misses Mary Ax, Hilda 
Heller, Hilda Hess and Corrinne 
Dynne, alternate. The negative team 
consisted of Misses Mary Garber, 
Gladys Park, Elizabeth Miller and 
Bertha Weaver, alternate. The judges 
were Attorney Ray G. Light, J. Wal- 
ter Esbenshade, and Rev. C. E. Liebe- 

The debating teams are indebted to 
Miss Viola Wolfe and Winifred Peck, 
for the organ solos and group of 
songs that added greatly to the 
evening's enjoymaat. 

The first debate is over and lost. 
No, the debaters did not lose alone. 
Lebanon Valley College lost. The 
loss may not entirely be placed upon 
inability or lack of training. A po- 
tent factor of success in college ac- 
tivities is often determined by school 
spirit. The girls tried and tried 
hard. An audience, less than three- 
score, hardly warrants that the best 
has been done by the student body. 
The debaters are going to do then- 
level best on Thursday evening, 
when they meet Schuylkill in a dual 
debate. May we count on the stu- 
dent body? 




S©li<* c onSSrt 

• from your old 

— shoes-Werepair 
® £\ them lots of wear 




ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR 
COMPANY 



Fine 

Home-Made 
Candies 

LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 

A fine place to treat your 
friend 

TSCHUDY'S 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. 0. Bldg. 
West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



NO 



DROPS 
USED 

DR. HARRIS GRUMAN 

Eyesight Specialist — Optometrist 

GLASSES REPAIRED 
40 N. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



L. N. HEILMAN 

UP-TO-DATE DENTAL EQUIPMENT 
Above Batdorf s Dept. Store 

West Main Street — — — — , ANNVILL 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. 0. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp'' Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



to 
Class 
presi 
bush 
his p 
Penr 
the 
Lebs 
amoi 
Was 
team 
Presi 
sibili 
ercis 
of v 
class 
Presi 
his f 
of » 2 



r 



DON'T FORGET 
EURYDICE CONCERT 



TONIGHT 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



DO YOU FAVOR 
A POINT SYSTEM 
AT L. V. 



VOLUME II 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1927 



NUMBER 10 



LAFAYETTE GAGERS 
LOSE TOMYLINMEN 

Blue and White Outclass the 
Strong Lafayette Team 
at Easton 



Lebanon Valley decively outplayed 
Lafayette College at Easton, March 3, 
by defeating them 28-22. It was the 
biggest floor on which the local team 
has played this year. This offered 
exceptionally good chances for some 
good passing. Lafayette opposed 
with much fight but were unable to 
overcome the lead held by Lebanon 
Valley throughout the second half of 
game. The first half was particular- 
ly closely contested for Lafayette 
lead at half time by the score of 14-8. 
Gelbert was high scorer for Lebanon 
Valley with 5 field goals and 2 fouls 
(Continued on Page 4) 



JUNIORS 



WILL SHOW 
DRAMATIC ABILITY 



Program of Tragedy, Everyday 
Life and Subtle Humor 
will Feature 



The evening of March 23rd, has 
finally been chosen as "gala night" 
for the Juniors. Three splendid, one- 
act plays, "He" by Eugene O'neill, "A 
Well-Remembered Voice" by Sir 
James Barrie and "The Dark Lady of 
the Sonnets" by Bernard Shaw will 
furnish a program of tragedy, every- 
day life and subtle humor. 

The caste of each of these plays has 
•pent many hours, studying and, 
learning to interpret the parts which 
have been assigned to them by the 
director, Dr. Wallace. Success de- 
pends not only upon the ability of 
the actors to perform their parts 
easily but also skillfully and is the 
quality which they are striving to 
acquire. On the other hand much of 
the success of these plays is in the 
keeping of the student body and the 
friends of the students. The per- 
formance will be worth-while. The 
players are earnest and well-trained. 
The audience should be large and 
sympathetic. Come out and support 
the Juniors. 



SENIORS ELECT ROY 

V. MOUER PRESIDENT 



Owing to the death of the Senior 
Class leader, Alfred Hershey, a new 
President was elected at a special 
business meeting of the class, to take 
his place. Roy V. Mouer, of Oakville, 
I*enna., was the one chosen to head 
the class for its final semester at 
Lebanon Valley. He is a leader 
a mong the men of the school, and 
^as manager of this year's football 
^am. The duties of the Senior class 
President require time and respon- 
Sl bility owing to the graduation ex- 
seises, many of the arrangements, 
°f which have to be made by the 
c lass. We feel confident that our new 
President has the ability to carry out 
functions as president of the class 
of '27 in its final work. 



Lebanon Valley to Conduct Summer Course 

in Marine Biology off Coast of Bermuda Islands 

Dr. Derickson of Biology Department, Collector of Eocure and Meocure Fossils for Vassar 
College, who Studied in the Bermuda Islands will Instruct Class 
E. L. Mark of Harvard Offers Use of Facilities 



CLASS WILL BE LIMITED TO FIFTEEN STUDENTS AND WILL EMBARK JUNE 20 



Lebanon Valley College will be ex- 
tended to the Bermuda Islands during 
the 1927 summer session, it has been 
recently announced. The college has 
approved the plan of Dr. S. H. Der- 
ickson, to conduct a class in Marine 
Biology at that place. The schedule 
of travel from Annville to Bermuda 
and return is completed, and a limit- 
ed number of steamship reservations 
will be made. 

The idea of this trip for study was 
originated by Dr. Derickson about a 
year ago. It was related to several 
graduates and present students of 
the college, all of which though well 
of it. A desire was expressed by all 
to take the course if it could be offer- 
ed. Accordingly investigations were 
made, and it was found that the con- 
ditions would be favorable. The plan 
was then authorized by the authori- 



ties of the college, who decided that 
eight semester hours shall be accred- 
ited for the work, which may count 
either toward a Bachelor's, or a Mas- 
ter's degree. 

The class will leave Annville for 
New York, by the Reading Railroad, 
on June 20, and will stop at the Ho- 
tel Majestic in New York City. Sev- 
eral days will be spent, in the Botan- 
ical Gardens in the Bronx, the Ameri- 
can Museum of Natural History, the 
Zoological Garden, and the marine 
Aquarium. The group will leave New 
York on the Furness Bermuda Line, 
on June 25, and will arrive in Ber- 
muda on June 27. The time will be 
spent there in the collection and 
study of the various marine plants 
and animals, with particular refer- 
ence to their habits, morphology, and 
ecological relationships. The party 



will leave Bermuda on July 26, and 
will arrive in Annville on July 28. 

Prof. E. L. Mark, of Harvard Col- 
lege, director of the Bermuda Biolog- 
ical Station for Research, is cooperat- 
ing with Dr. Derickson and has ex- 
tended a cordial invitation to the 
class to make use of the facilities the 
station has to offer. Mr. L. L. Mow- 
bray has also extended an invitation 
to the class to study the rich collec- 
tions of marine life exhibited in the 
Bermuda Aquarium, of which he is 
director. The cooperation of the men 
in charge of the Botanical Garden, 
the Zoological Garden, the American 
Museum of Natural History and the 
Marine Aquarium, has also been as- 
sured. With the help of all these 
men the students will surely feel at 
home wherever they are studying. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



ALBRIGHT REVENGES 
WITH bITTER DEFEAT 

Mylinmen Fail to Get Started 
with Rivals in Final 
Game of Season 



The old rivals — Lebanon Valley 
and Albright — staged their annual 
basketball game on the Lebanon 
High floor wherein Albright retali- 
ated for their first defeat by defeat- 
ing Lebanon Valley 50-39. It was a 
loosely played game throughout, Al- 
bright at all stages having the edge 
on Lebanon Valley in passing and 
shooting goals. It seemed that 
while Albright was very efficient in 
making goals Lebanon Valley lacked 
the necessary fight to come through. 
At all angles of the floor Albright 
shot perfectly. Their offensive work 
was well displayed. Lebanon Valley 
had many chances at the goals but 
failed to throw them perfectly. The 
score at half time was 24-19 in Al- 
bright's favor. The latter half was 
(Continued on Page 2) 



POINT SYSTEM MAY 
BE ACCEPTED HERE 

Faculty - Student Council to 
Discuss System and 
Take Action 



It appears that the Point System is 
going to be given a trial at Lebanon 
Valley. The joint Faculty-Student 
Council is preparing to take definite 
action upon the matter and perhaps 
till another year Lebanon Valley w"ll 
enjoy the results of such a system. 

The Women's Student Government 
Association has already discussed the 
matter and approved its adoption. 
Other organizations on the campus 
are preparing to discuss it. 



FINAL STAR COURSE 
NUMBER A BIG HIT 

The Adanac Quartet Renders 
Varied And Pleasing 
Program 



The students and friends of the col- 
lege had a real treat on Tuesday, 
March 8th, in being permitted to hear 
the internationally known Adanac 
Male Quartet. It was undoubtedly 
the finest quartet ever heard in this 
vicinity. 

They began their program in Scot- 
tish costume, singing those familiar 
ballads which we never tire of listen- 
ing. The second half of the program 
was varied, ranging from grand op- 
era selections, to those of a humorous 
character. The readings of Mr. Mc- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



DR. AND MRS GOSSARD 

ENTERTAIN AT TEA 

According to the annual custom of 
our honored President and his wife, 
the Sophomore girls were entertain- 
ed at a tea at the home of the Presi- 
dent. The program for the tea was 
presented by the class cousins— the 
Seniors — whose numbers on the pro- 
gram were very select and extremely 
novel. 

The program opened with a piano 
solo by Grace Daniel. "My Shadow," 
recited by Mary McLanachan and 
pantomined by Myra Shaeffer af- 
forded much amusement and was 
thororughly enjoyed. The two se- 
lections, "The Mither Heart" by Wil- 
liam Stickler and "The Japanese Love 
Song" by Clayton Thomes," were 
sung by Lucille Kann and were fol- 
lowed by an original poem dedicated 
to the Sophomores entitled "My Sis- 
ters" by Madeline Mark. Grace Dan- 
iel played a second piano solo and the 
(Continued on Page 2) 



MILES S. MEHNER 
1929 QUITTIE EDITOR 

Archie Lutz Elected Business 
Manager for Junior 
Publication 



The Sophomore class recently met 
to elect the staff for the 1929 Quitta- 
pahilla. By vote the class chose 
Miles S. Kiehner as Editor-in-Chief, 
and Archie Lutz as Business Manager. 
It was voted by the class that these 
two officers should select the remain- 
der of their staff, which should be 
approved by a committee represent- 
ing the class. After careful consider- 
ation the staff has been completed. 
The following is the complete staff: 

Editor-in-Chief, Miles S. Kiehner; 
Business Manager, Archie Lutz; Asso- 
ciate Editor, Henry Aungst; Art Edi- 
tor, John Beattie; Associate Art Edi- 
tor, Wilson Lewars; Literary Editor, 
Carol Brinser; Athletic Editor, May- 
nard Wilson; Feature Editor, Ruth 
(Continued on Page 3) 



CO-ED DEBATERS 
LOSE DUAL MEET 

Girls to Meet Albright Men 
in Dual Session To- 
morrow Night 



The Giirl's Debating Teams met the 
Schuylkill Girls' Teams in a dual de- 
bate on Thursday evening, March 
3rd, resulting in a two to one victory 
for both of the opponent's teams. 
Both contests were characterized by 
enthusiasm, school spirit, and friend- 
ly rivalry. The question for the sea- 
son, "Resolved, That the United 
States should cancel the War Debts 
owed to it by the Allied Nations*' was 
ably defended by well-trained, thor- 
oughly-informed contestants. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



EURYDICE CLUB 
ENTERTAIN 





ONIGHT 



Club Assisted by Mrs. Mills 
and Mrs. Harnish— Miss 
Engle Director 

The Girls' Eurydice Choral Club of 
Lebanon Valley College will give its 
annual concert tonight, Thursday 
evening, March 17, at 8 o'clock in En- 
gle Hall. The price of admission is 
fifty cents. Every student is urged 
to attend for the concert this year 
has several special features. The 
club will be assisted by two wellr 
known soloists, Mrs. Edith Frantz 
Mills and Mrs. Edith Gingrich Har- 
nish. The second part of the pro- 
gram will prove very spectacular 
with its gay costumes, dancers, and 
orchestra. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



GLEE CLUB SINGS 

IN CAPITOL CITY 

Glee Club Sings in New Park, 
Dallastown, Baltimore 
and Washington 

The Men's Glee Club of Lebanon 
Valley left on Friday morning for a 
week's tour through several Pennsyl- 
vania towns as well as the cities of 
Baltimore and Washington. This is 
the first tour of the season, although 
the club rendered two concerts two 
weeks ago, one in Reading and one 
in Lebanon. 

The schedule aa announced for this 
trip included New Park on Friday 
evening and Dallastown on Saturday 
evening. On Sunday morning the 
club appeared in the services of the 
United Brethren church, of Dallas- 
town. In the afternoon the Club left 
for Baltimore and attended the even- 
ing services in the Salem United 
Brethren church of that city, where 
it also rendered several numbers. On 
Monday evening the regular concert 
was given in Baltimore and on Tues- 
day the club left for Washington and 
sang under the auspices of the Unit- 
continued on Page 3) 



STUDENTS ON RADIO 

PROGRAM FROM WMBS 



Another of the predictions of the 
"1927 Quittapahilla" has come true. 
"Hen" Ludwig popular pianist has 
made his first appearance before the 
radio audience. Ludwig is well known 
about the college and Lebanon foi 
his ability to tickle the ivories. On 
Friday evening, March 11th, a pro- 
gram was broadcasted by the "Chef 
who conducts a banquet hall, east of 
Annville, from station WMBS at 
Harrisburg. 

The program consisted of Lebanon 
Valley talent. The program started 
with a few dance numbers by "Skip- 
per" Hain and his Night Hawks. This 
was followed by a few delightful vo- 
cal numbers by Miss Bernita Burrier. 
Miss Burrier possesses a very charm- 
ing soprano vioce and pleased her 
invisible audience very much. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



i 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1^7 



lafieColkjiennt 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiel 
WALTER L. NESS, '27 
Associate Editors 

MYRA 0. SHEAFFER, '27 MARY McLANACHAN, '27 

Conservatory - RUTH STRUBHAR, '2<J 

Athletics ELMER REISER, '2b 

dio ' ALICE KINDT, '28 

Delphian" KATHRYN YOUNG, '27 

Kalo LAWRENCE DERICKSON, 'V 

Philo J. BRUCE BEHNEY, '28 

General EDNA C. GRAHAM, '23 

DARKES ALBRIGHT ,'28 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WADE S. MILLER, '27 

Circulation Manager CLARENCE ULRICH, '27 

Associate Business Manager RAYMOND KOCH, '28 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



EDITORIALS 



ANOTHER MILESTONE 



To the new staff: We wish for you the greatest success- 

It has been one of the greatest opportunities of our colleg 
life to serve as a member of this staff and we trust oufr ■ efl oris 
have not been in vain. We have tried to reflect back to the stu- 
dents and friends the college spirit and lite 

You will need cooperation and it will take hard work, but we 
as a staff feel you are capable and with a willing effort you ran 
produce an excellent paper. , ■ 

And now, we of the staff of 1927 lay down our work that it 
may be taken up by the newly appointed staff, hoping that you 
will profit by aur mistakes and that yours will be a year oi 
happiness and success. 

NOTE-The 1927-28 "La Vie Collegienne" staff has not been appointed as yet by the faculty 
but will be named till the next issue goes to press. 



DEFEAT VS VICTORY 

"And though you win your goal or only near it 
Can win with poise or lose with equal grace." 

The quotation above is one of the most difficult attainments 
of one's life Few men, few organizations, or few schools have 
fully realized this goal. It may not be so difficult to win with 
poise but the real test of an individual's character comes when 
he meets defeat. It is not an easy mater to accept a defeat with 
a smile. There is always the temptation to sneer, find excuses; 
and complain. But the individual who has accomplished this 
and who meets defeat with grace is a true gentleman. 

Organizations and schools, as well as individuals, have this 
same difficulty to combat. This perhaps can be most readily 
seen at a game. Can the onlookers, as well as the contestants, 
take a defeat with a smile, or are they going to make some 
excuse, as placing the cause of the defeat on the referee? With 
reference to the last few games, we challenge your judgments, 
students of Lebanon Valley College, have we not met defeat in a 
splendid manner and as gentlemen shoud? 



HAVE YOU HEARD THIS? 

Did you ever hear anybody say, "That teacher makes me 
sick " Then again, did it ever enter your thoughts that probably 
he thinks jufct the same about you and maybe feels discouraged 
because none of his efforts has had any apparent result? 1 hmk 
of the hours aJnd worry that have been spent m trying to work 
yut a plan so that everyone will have an opportunity to achieve. 
Yes part of education is to learn that there are two sides to a 
great many problems.. If you don't believe it ask the Economu 

Students. . 

This is the time of year when everybody is taking account 
of their store of knowledge or rather the "profs" are do'ing it for 
us. Be broadminded and make a fair estimate of your work, 
instead of blaming everything on someone else. No matter how- 
impossible teachers may seem to be, try and see if they aren't 
really human in the final analysis. Not everyone in the class 
fails so take heart and be strong enough to admit that you are 
the one responsible for the failure. Don't shift responsibility be- 
cause it shows weakness of ability- 

Those who have achieved success deserve credit for their 
work. It is a compliment to the one w ho gives knowledge as 
well as to the one who receives it. Those who need suggestions 
for a method to measure up to standards which they have made 
for themselves or the standards of the schools, John Ruskin sub- 
mits this plan. "If you want knowledge you must toil for it; if 
food, you must toil for it and if pleasure, you must toil For it. 
Toil is the Law. Pleasure comes through toil and not through 
self indulgence and indolence. When one gets to love work, his 
ife is a happy one." 



I College Calendar j 

March 17 

6:10 P.M. — Ministerium. 
7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabind 
Meeting. 

8:00 P.M. — College Band Practice. 

March 18 
8:00" P.M.— Joint Session of Kaloze- 
tean and Delphian Literary Societies. 
March 20 
5:45 P.M.— Y. W. Devotional Serv- 
ice. 

March 21 

4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P_M.— Writer's Club. 
9:00 P_M_— Men's Senate. 

March 22 
4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer Meet- 
ing. 

March 23 

4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board Meet- 
ing. 

8:00 P.M.— Junior Plays. 

March 24 
6:10 P.M. — Ministerium. 
7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

8:00 P.M. — College Band Practise. 

March 25 
7:00 P.M. — Regular Sessions of Lit 
erary Societies. 

March 27 
5:45 P.M.— Y. W. Devotional Serv 
ice. 

March 28 
4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M.— Reader's Club. 
9:00 P.M.— Men's Senate. 

March 29 
4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer Meeting- 
March 33 
4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board Meet 
ing. 

6:15 P.M.— L Club Entertainment. 

Alumni Notes 



Charles Smith, 24, and his wife, 
Ruth Oyer Smith, '24, moved recently 
from South Hampton, N. Y., to 
Wayne, Pa. Mr. Smith is now teach- 
ing science in the Radnor High 
School at Wayne. 

According to a recent dispatch, 
Harold B. Bender, '22 has been 
forced to flee from China. After 
graduating from Lebanon Valley and 
continuing his studies at Harvard, he 
became head of the biology depart- 
ment of Yale University in China. 
Due to war conditions he has been 
obliged to leave the country and is 
now on the Pacific, enroute for Amer- 
ica, with his child and wife, a grad- 
uate of Brown University. 

Olive Darling, '21, has recently been 
appointed secretary to the president 
of Northwestern University. 

G. Wallace W. Hanger, '84, of the 
Federal Board of Meditation, is on 
his way from Washington, D. C, to 
California. His work for the next 
few months will keep him on the Pa- 
cific Coast looking after affairs of 
state. Mr. Hanger is a nephew of 
Bishop J. J. Glossbrenner who was a 
honored bishop in the church for 
twenty years. 

J. Walter Espenshade, '03, princi- 
pal of the Lebanon High School, stat- 
ed that he would not be an applicant 
for re-election. He has been on the 
Lebanon High School faculty for 
twenty years. 

Rev. C. C. Gohn, '02 of the First 
United Brethren church, of Johns- 
town, left for Europe several weeks 
ago to be gone three or four months 
traveling in the Holy Lands. His 
post in the Johnstown church is to be 
supplied by appointments during his 
absence. 

Misses Yvonne Green and Mary 
Wallace instructors, were visitors at 
the United States Naval Academy, 
Annapolis, Md., over the week-end. 




"O wad some Pow'r the giftie &ie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



—BURNS 



A PAGE FROM TRUE STORY; 

Dear Reader: — 

Oh, I beg of you to be- 
lieve me that I am indeed weary. This 
strain of picturing you as "ithers see 
ye;" of trying to grind out some* 
thing funny when it is 12 P. M. and 
sleep is worrying me — all this has 
been my experience for many a day. 
The purpose of this letter of confes- 
sion (published by the kind permis- 
sion of the editors of True Story— 
who are always seeking for truth 
which is truth and which elevates) is 
to help some other "brother" or "sis- 
ter" who will soon take up this task 
— may he or she carry it on more 
successfully! Also to give my read- 
ers an idea of the constant jeopardy 
I am living under, lest this column; 
intended to excite at least a smile, 
will be mistaken for a funeral orar 
tion! 

I shall proceed to explain to my 
successor, my method of attack! First 
of all, one must be keenly alert in 
class. In this way you can kill twd> 
birds with one stone. First of all 
you get the Prof's lecture and that is 
helpful against some further judg- 
ment; then again many of the so 
called "monkey shines" originate in 
the classroom. Let me expedite mat- 
ters by citing some examples which, 
A or B individual have furnished. 
Have you ever heard the anecdote 
concerning Lincoln and Cartwrightj 
when they were running for Con- 
gress? I will repeat it for those who 
were not in History class. Peter 
Cartwrigiht, the famous preacher, 
asked his audience, which included 
Lincoln, first — "How many of you are 
going to heaven?" Everyone rose but 
Lincoln. Then he asked, "How many 
are going to hell?" No one responds 
ed. Then Cartwright said, "Mr. Lin- 
coln, where are you going?" Loncoln 
answered that he thought such per- 
sonal questions should not be asked 
but since the question was put to 
him "he was going to Congress." This 
is real humor — but it was heightened 
by having our attention arrested by 
the many times that story must have 
been told and retold by "tobacco 



A LETTER OF CONFESSION 

juice marksmen, who not only told 
the story but emphasized it by punc- 
tuating the sentences with their 
marksmanship's skill! This is humor 
and realism. Then there is HIGHER 
math where the students solve a 
"dam" problems — and that isn't 
swearing either. But the deepest sub- 
ject as yet discovered on our curricu- 
lum is in the Latin department when 
a young lady in her recitation was 
told to go down "to the bodies of the 
dead!" So deep as to be uncanny, 
ain't? A Scriptural basis for a con- 
tention is something effective but 
when it is supported by this well 
known verse, somewhat (?) reversed: 
"It is more blessed to receive than to 
give" — one almost comes to the con- 
clusion that the person quoting this 
must be Scotch. 

These are enough examples of 
"class room" procedure— Here are 
other ways. Second in importance 
are the college dormitories. But 
since this magazine prints only the 
choicest material, I must refrain from 
mentioning the dirt that collects in 
these halls. How much more valu- 
able information could be put in this 
column if only "the one half knew 
what the other half said." Then there 
are the L. Club shows, games, etc. 
which provide enough comments 
from the side lines alone to make a 
weighty volume. 

Now, my successor and patient 
reader, can you understand my ex- 
haustion as I close this strenuous 
turn. It has been a laughing job— 
and "it is better to laugh than be 
sighing," but in my closing words, I 
heartily indorse the critic of Shakes- 
peare who said that "Shakespeare 
had to kill Falstaff or Falstaff would 
have killed Shakespeare." The anal- 
ogy is not perfect but I should either 
shortly murder this column or it 
would have killed me. Reader, am I 
not expressing your sentiments; if I 
leave with you these words of Long- 
fellow "we should be thankful for the 
ink that remains in the inkwells of 
the writers." 

No longer, 

four Tormentor. 



STUDENTS ON RADIO 

PROGRAM FROM WMBS 

(Continued from page 1) 



Fisher with the banjo and Kennedy 
with the saxophone proved to be 
equally as entertaining. "Skipper" 
Hain's orchestra furnished the strains 
of syncopation which most of us are 
familiar with. Ludwig with his pop- 
ular dance diversions also contribut- 
ed to the success of the program. 

We are all very sory to hear of the 
fire which destroyed the studio of the 
Mack Battery Station, on Sunday; 
from which station the program was 
broadcasted. We trust that the new : 
station as planned will soon be com- 
pleted and that we will again have 
the pleasure to listen to some of our 
own talent. 



DR. AND MRS. GOSSARD 

ENTERTAIN AT TEA 

(Continued from Page 1) 
program was brought to a close by 
the sketch "The Divine Inspiration" 
by Miriam Daugherty, Jennie Shoop, 
Myra Shaeffer, Mary McLanachan 
and Lucille Kann. Most delicious re- 
freshments were served by the Soph- 
omore class sisters and all the girls 
declared their tea was one of the big 
successes of the events in the college 
year. 



ALBRIGHT REVENGES 

WITH BITTER DEFEAT 

(Continued from Page 1) 
closely contested in comparison to 
the first. Albright evened the series 
by winning, Lebanon Valley having 
taken the first game. Greggs and 
Clemens starred for Albright, the 
former having 21 points to his credit- 
Piela of Lebanon Valley, was high 
scorer for the home team with 23 
points to his credit. 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1927 



PAGE THREE 



to 
ries 
ing 
and 
the 
dit 
ieth 

23 



WHY THE POINT SYSTEM 

Perhaps you have already read the 
editorial on the Point System in the 
las t issue of "La Vie Collegienne." If 
not, may we suggest that you do so 
imin editately and become acquainted 
w ith the merits of such a system. It 
has been tried and adopted by many 
f the leading colleges and universi- 
ties of the country and the time has 
come when the smaller schools will 
adopt it. 

The system needs very little if any 
further explanation. Each activity 
that demands the time and energy of 
the student has affixed to it a cer- 
tain number of units or points as- 
signed by comparison. The student 
upon election to an office shall re- 
ceive the number of points assigned 
to that particular activity. When a 
student has received the allotted 
number of points (about forty) he 
would be informed of the fact and 
would be prohibited from accepting 
more extra-curricular work. 

The point system has been estab- 
lished at Juniata. This decision fol- 
lows the ratification of a resolution 
passed with a few amendments by a 
vote of the joint Student Associa- 
tions. This new system will limit all 
extra curricular activities— something 
which L. V. C. would do well to emu- 
late. 

In an effort to make the above 
clear we have placed a valuation 
upon several of the activities, on the 
campus, in terms of units or points. 
No student is permitted to carry 
more than forty points. With the aid 
of information furnished by Weaton 
College, we are able to submit the 
following: 

La Vie Collegienne — 

Activity Points 

Editor-in-chief 25 

Business and Advertising Man- 
agers 20 

Associate Editors 20 

Alumni Editor 13 

Others 1° 

Men's Senate and W. S. G. A. — 

President 23 

Vice president 12 

Secretary 1"- 

Upper class members 10 

Lower class members 8 

Literary Societies — 

President 17 

Vice president . — 8 

Recording secretary 7 

Treasurer 7 

Corresponding Secretary 10 

Sergant-at-arms 9 

Athletics — 

"L" Club president 15 

Managers of Intercollegiate 

sports 15 

Cheer leaders 7 

Manager of girls' atheletics 5 

Glee Clubs — 

President 7 

Vice Presidents 3 

Librarians 2 

Ouittapahilla Staff- 
Editor 30 

Associate Editor 15 

Business Manager 30 

Art Editor 20 

Literary Editor 10 

Photographic Editor 20 

Advertising Manager 15 

Circulation Manager 15 

Alumni Editor 12 

Student Volunteer Band — 

President 9 

Secretary 7 

Treasurer 2 

debating Union — 
Manager of Inter-class debates _ 8 
Assistant Manager 6 

*• Cabinets — 

President 12 

Sec retary-treasurer 7 

Y. M. Religious Meetings 7 

Members of Cabinet 6 

dass Officers — 

Senior President 15 

Junior President 11 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



PRE-SPRING PROGRAM 

REiNDERED BY Ki.LO 



On Friday evening, March 12, Kalo 
met in a regular literary session, and 
although the subject for discussion 
was not "Spring," it might have been 
called a "Pre-Spring" session. Laur- 
ence Derickson started the program 
with a discussion of, "The Symptoms 
of Spring." This was followed by 
some "Spring Blues," blown from the 
trumbone of Maynard Wilson. Harry 
Zechman then gave several humorous 
readings, and was followed by some 
original stories by Henry Aungst. 
The program was concluded with, 
"Gleanings from the Edges of the 
World," by James Hazelton. 



UNIQUE DUTCH PROGRAM 
PRESENTED BY CLIOS 



Clio got in "Dutch" March 11 when 
she presented a "saurkraut" program. 
It was very good "saurkraut" and 
quite aristocratic and genteel as the 
following numbers will suggest: 
Home Making in the Pennsylvania 

Wilderness Mary McCurdy 

A Collection of Poems__Sara Blecker 

Ephrata Cloisters Myra Shaeffer 

A Group of Songs Leah Miller 

Bred in the Bone Jane Fearnow 

Estella Michaels 

The critic's remarks hinted at more 
delectable "sauerkraut" for future 
meetings. All that is necessary is to 
find "cooks'' with as great a knack 
for preparing and seasoning as those 
who served this concoction. 



GLEE CLUB SINGS 

IN CAPITOL CITY 

(Continued from page 1) 



ed Brethren church. This concert 
completed the schedule of the tour 
and the Club returned on Wednesday. 

It seems as though misfortune is 
still pursuing the Club for it is fear- 
ed that Mr. Frank Hoffman, a first 
tenor, who is in a hospital in Leba- 
non slowing recovering from a seri- 
ous operation, will be lost to the 
Club for the most of the season. Thus 
far the Club has lost seven members 
through sickness and low scholastic 
standing and so the membership has 
been reduced from twenty-seven to 
twenty. The spirit of the Club still 
remains high, nevertheless, and wher- 
ever the Club appeared the audiences 
were highly satisfied with the type 
of program presented. 

The date of the home concert is not 
yet definitely decided upon but ef- 
forts are being put forth to arrange 
for the concert on the evening of 
May Day. Such arrangements would 
meet with the hearty approval of stu- 
dents and friends of the college, for 
the concert would add a touch of 
completeness to the annual May Day 
exercises. 



MILES S. KIEHNER 

1929 QUITTIE EDITOR 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Light; Society Editor, Mildred Lane; 
Conservatory Editor, Ruth Strubhar; 
Photographer, Dominic Calabrese; 
Advertising Manager, Lawrence Der- 
ickson; Sales Manager, Wayne Spar- 
row. 

The Editor and Business Manager 
have already interviewed several 
photographers and engravers, but no 
contracts have been awarded. How- 
ever, it is expected that plans will 
be made in the near future and work 
will soon begin. 



Sophomore President 9 

Freshman President * 

Vice president * 



DELPHIAN S IN SEASON 
STAGE MARCH PROGRAM 



On Friday evening in Delphian 
Hall a very appropriate program was 
presented as follows: 
MARCH 

Beware the Ides of March 

Esther Flickinger 

March of the Wooden Soldiers 

Ruth Strubhar 

March Winds Elizabeth Hoy 

The Lion and the Lamb-Hilda Heller 

Forward! March! 

Kathryn Flinchbaugh 



EURYDICE CLUB TO 

ENTERTAIN TONIGHT 

(Continued from page 1) 



Miss Ruth Engle, head of the Con- 
servatory of Music, is the very able 
director of the chorus, and the suc- 
cess of the concert is a credit to her 
leadership as well as to the coopera- 
tion of the girls. 

The following program will be 
given: 

PART I 

Spirit of Music Stephens 

The Club 

Pastorate Carey-Saar 

Irish Folk Tune Foote 

Miss Benetta Burrier and Club 

Reading, "Robert of Sicily" 

Longfellow 
Miss Anna Apgar 

Solo Mrs. Edith Gingrich Harnish 

Ode to the River Drygo-Silver 

Thy Beaming Eyes MacDowell 

April, My April Milligan 

The Club 
Quartet, "All Through the Night"__ 

Rhys-Herbert 
Misses Leah Miller, Mary Overly 
Winifred Peck and Hilda Hess 

Ave Maria Bach-Gounod 

arr. by Saar 
Mrs. Harnish, Mrs. Mills, 
The Club, and violin obligato 
by Alcesta Schlichter 
PART II 

Duet from "Madam Butterfly" 

Puccini 
Mrs. Harnish and Mrs. Mills 
In Spain 
Habanera 

The Club, Dancers, and Orchestra 
PART III 

Reading, "The Bear Story" 

James Whitcomb Riley 
Miss Anna Apgar 

Solo Mrs. Edith Frantz Mills 

Cantata, "A Spring Symphony" 

Golson 

1. Allegro con moto 

2. Andante Appassinata 

3. Scherzo, Finale, Presto 
Mrs. Harnish and the Club 

The personnel of the Club is as fol- 
lows: 

First Sopranos 
Katherine Wheeler Esther Baker 
Sara Blecker Violet Ferree 

Benetta Burrier Naomi Fraunfelter 
Mary Overly Mary Hartz 

Violet Krone Leah Miller 

Alice Woy Corinne Dyne 

Second Sopranos 
Miriam Dougherty Mary Showers 
Blanche Stager Mildred Saylor 

Arabella Overly Olive Weigle 

Mary Grubb Marian Light 

Madeline Rife Ruth March 

Mildred Meyers Alcesta Schlicter 

First Altos 
Florence Dundore Faye Bachman 
Irene Schell Eleanor Kissinger 

Mae Burkholder Irene Peter 

Winifred Peck Ruth Strubhar 



Treasurer 

Secretary r 

Ministerial Association- 
President ^ 

Vice president 3 

Secretary-treasurer 2 



KELCHNER INSTALLED 

AS PHILO PRESIDENT 



On Friday evening the members of 
Philo presented another of the pro- 
grams which have been creating a 
good deal of comment on the campus 
because of their originality and in- 
terest. The session opened with the 
installation of the newly elected offi- 
cers. Mr. Robert Kelchner delivered 
his inaugural address, voicing the de- 
sires and ambitions which he holds 
for the society. Mr. Kelchner has al- 
ways been a loyal and active mem- 
ber of Philo and so he is quite worthy 
of the honor conferred upon him by 
its members. 

The program which followed the 
installation contained a good deal of 
variety as usual, and held the atten- 
tion of the audience throughout. The 
debate, especially, was of interest, for 
it showed how friendly roommates 
may become hostile to each other 
when the occasion demands. The ar- 
rangement of the program was as 
follows: 

The Einstein Theory__Samuel Meyer 

My Hobby Albert Sitlinger 

Something — Nothing 

Roy Flinchbaugh 

Round and Round Ira Matter 

Debate: — Resolved, that Vare'c Seat 
in the Senate should be taken from 
him. 

Aff., Henry Kohler — Neg., Harvey Ni- 

trauer. 

A Footprint Leroy Fegley 

On Thursday of last week Philo 
held the spring elections. The newly 
elected officers are: 

President Albert Kelchner 

Vice President Jacob Horst 

Rec. Sec Harold Ridei 

Cor. Sec Elmer Keiser 

Treasurer Luke Mimure 

Critic Wade Miller 

Chaplain Henry Kohler 

Ch. Ex. Com Harvey Nitrauer 

Editor Ralph Sprecher 

Pianist Robert Jacks 

Judge Clarence Ulrich 

Janitors William Myers 

John Snyder 
Lloyd Weber 



Second Altos 
Eleanor Snoke Viola Wolf 

Anna Apgar Hilda Hess 

Dorothy Heister Josephine Yake 

Accompanist 
Grace Daniels 



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Lebanon, Pa. 

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4 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1927 



I Kampus Kracks | 

OLIVETTE: Will you marry me? 
WAMPLER: Do I look like a min- 
ister? 



Zemski tried 
To make 
The boys 
Believe 
That 
He came 
To school 
In 

A Cole Eight 
He did— 
A 

Coal car 
With 

Eight wheels ! ! ! 



The Reading Glee Club Trip 
RABBIT: What did you do after 
the party? 
DANNY: Oh — nothing to speak of. 
RABBIT: Oh ! ! ! 



"SI" SHENK: Dad, I got a zero in 
Math today. 
DAD: That's nothing. 



JOHN HAFER: Prof, do you think 
you'll ever be able to do anything 
with my voice? 

PROF. ROGERS: Well, it may 
come in handy in case of fire! 



PROF. GINGRICH: What did the 
Middle Ages contribute to our pre- 
sent social system? 

ARCHIE LUTZ: Chaperones! 



BENDIGO: What makes that red 
spot on your nose? 
MOYER: Glasses. 
BENDIGO: Of what? 



GLADDY: Barney told me a story 
last night. 

KAY: Can he tell a good story. 

GLADDY: Yes— he holds his audi- 
ence from start to finish. 



"BRUTE" WIEST: What member 
of the faculty reminds you of the 
campus? 

"HERC" SCHWALM: I'll bite. 

"BRUTE": Soggy! 



The wet senator's slogan: 
'Bar the jingo and let the gin go. 



MOSER: I don't like the drummer 
in our band. 

LEADER: Why not? 

MOSER: He's beating my time. 



Note found in the Dormitory: 
Dear Barney: 

Why do they call you Barney 
Whale? 

Your affectionate 

Mother. 



WANTED: Second hand "True 
Story" Magazines. Send all contribu- 
tions to 

"Hungry" Lebo, 
Room 29, Men's Dorm. 



"BOOT": Are you shaving? 
"ZORK": No — I'm razing a beard. 



JANIE LEE: They say there is 
still smuggling going on at night on 
the beaches. 

"LEFT TACKLE": Yes, and 
grandma says it's shameful, too. 



In 1950 there will probably be laws 
against playing marbles for keeps. 

LAFAYETTE CAGERS 

LOSE TO MYLTNMEN 

(Continued from Page 1) 



for a total of 12 points. The guards 
played a splendid defensive game 
while Wheeler at center laways was 
able to get the tip off on his oppo- 
nent. 



LEBANON VALLEY TO 
CONDUCT SUMMER 
COURSE IN MARINE 
BIOLOGY OFF COAST 
OF BERMUDA ISLES 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Dr. Derickson will personally su- 
pervise and direct all work. He is 
well qualified for this, by his experi- 
ence. He graduated from Lebanon 
Valley in 1902, took graduate work 
at John's Hopkins, and was sent as 
Land Zoologist on an expedition to 
the Bahamas, by the Baltimore Geo- 
graphical Society. He was then 
elected to the directorship of the 
Biology Department in Lebanon Val- 
ley, where he has served to the pres- 
ent time. In the summer of 1908 he 
directed the collection of Eocene and 
Meocene Fossils for Vassar College, 
and in 1910 he studied in the Ber- 
muda Islands. Thus, he is well ac- 
quainted with condition on the is- 
lands, and will be able to obtain all 
possible advantages for the success 
of the course. 

A letter containing complete infor- 
mation concerning the trip has re- 
cently been sent to a limited num- 
ber of those who had previously 
shown interest in the idea. It states 
that the class will be limited to fif- 
teen, and that early application for 
enrollment is advisable. It is proba- 
ble that most of the students will be 
graduates of Lebanon Valley. This 
should make a fine and happy group. 
Complete information may be had by 
application to Dr. Derickson. 



CO-ED DEBATERS 

LOSE DUAL MEET 

(Continued from page 1) 



The affirmative team consisting of 
Corinne Dyne, '30, Captain Hilda 
Heller, '27, and Hilda Hess, '30, with 
Mary Ax, '30, as alternate, assumed 
the defensive on home territory. Dr. 
S. Hoffman Derickson, head of the 
Biology department, acted as chair- 
man. 

The judges were Attorney Clarence 
Becker, Rev. J. L. Hynson, and Mr. 
C. A. Boyer, all of Lebanon. 

The negative team, Janet Miller, 
'29, Anne Apgar, '30, Captain Esther 
Flickinger, '28, and Mary Buch, '29, 
alternate, debated at Schuylkill. 

Although neither decision was in 
our favor, the teams were heartily 
supported by the student body. With 
their defeats behind them, the girls 
are preparing for future victories. 

On Friday night, March 18th, they 
will meet the men's teams of Al- 
bright College in a dual debate, with 



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For Quality 

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FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



GO-EDS LOSE LAST 
GAME OF SEASON 

Sextette Ends Successful Season 
Winning Six Out of 
Ten Games Played 

On Saturday, March 12, the Leba- 
non Valley co-eds were defeated by 
the Millersville Normal sextette by 
the score of 30-20. Captain Nell 
Rabenstine was high scorer for 
Lebanon Valley. Line ups: 
Lebanon Valley Millersville 

Rabenstine F. Herr 

Meyer F. McElwee 

J. Miller C. Hey 

I. Miller S.C. Wilson 

Mark G. Keller 

Fencil G. Inman 

Substitutions — Cochran, Freeman, 
Lane. 

Summary of season: 

L.V. Opp. 

Jan. 14 at Annville — Schuyl- 
kill 34 22 

Jan. 22 at Westminster — 

Western Maryland 8 39 

Jan. 29 at Annville — West- 
ern Maryland 29 49 

Feb. 5 at Chambersburg — 
Penn Hall 18 1 

Feb. 12 at Lebanon — Al- 
bright 23 32 

Feb. 16 at Reading— Schuyl- 
kill 29 16 

Feb. 19 at Annville — Get- 
tysburg 40 17 

Feb. 26 at Gettysburg— Get- 
tysburg 35 9 

March 4 at Lebanon — Al- 
bright 35 32 

March 12 at Millersville— 

Millersville Normal 20 30 

Total game played, 10. 
Total games won, 6. 



the affirmative teams away from 
home. It is anticipated that the audi- 
ences will be large and excitement 
high. On march 22nd they will have 
the return debate with Schuylkill, 
negative teams traveling. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
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STEVE WORNAS 



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Contractors 

and 

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Dealers in 

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ANNVILLE, PA. 



Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
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Annville _ Pa. 

Bowling and Billiards 



FINAL STAR COURSE 

NUMBER A BIG HIT 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Donald were particularly well ren- 
dered and enjoyed. The audience was 
spell bound when he gave his read- 
ing of "An Old Sea Caption." Every 
member was a real artist and the 
evenness, balance and voice blending 
featured. The company left Harris- 
burg at 5:08 the following morning 
for Florida where they will give con- 
certs in the southern states. 

The Star Course Committee is 
proud to announce that it has paid 
off the one hundred dollar debt from 
last year, paid for our course, and 
have approximately $25 in the treas- 
ury. This shows to us that you are 
interested in good entertainment and 
the committee for next year under 
the leadership of Mr. Pugh, is mak- 
ing an effort to give you you a course 
even better than this year. 

We thank you most heartily for 
your patronage, and hope to please 
you another year. 




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BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery: 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
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HIT THE BALL 
OVER THE BATTLEFIELD j 
AT GETTYSBURG 



Ia$ie (Eolktjienne 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



DON'T FORGET 
KALO ANNIVERSARY 
TOMORROW NIGHT 



VOLUME II 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, April 7, 1927 



NUMBER 1 1 



FLORENCE DUNDORE OF FREDERICKSBURG 

CHOSEN BY STUDENTS AS QUEEN OF MAY 



Nellie 



Rabenstine to be Maid of Honor; Attendants 
G- Buffington, B. Stager, M. Shaeffer, J. Shoop, 
M. Mark and K. Young 



are 



PLANS FOR CELEBRATION TO BEGIN AFTER EASTER 



Hail to the Queen of May, who in 
the person of Florence Dundore Will 
reign supreme in this year's May 
Day. After the regular chapel ser- 
vice last Tuesday morning a well reg- 
ulated system of voting was intro- 
duced and tne result ot the pod was 
as follows. Tne honor of May Queen 
goes to Florence Dunctore. rter main 
of honor is one wno is indeed wortny 
of the place for in the person 01 
Nellie Rabenstine we have a most 
representative girl of this years 
senior class. The attendants wno are 
Blanche Stager, Kathryn lounj;, 
Gladys Buliington Madeline Man-., 
Myra Sheatter and Jennie Snoop will 
likewise call forth the admiration oi 
the crowd. 

' The observance of May Day is un- 
doubtedly the mose cherished custom 
among tne students, and it is the 
greatest honor students can attribute 
to their number to choose the repre- 
sentative girls of the senior class as 
the leaders in this day of days. 

Flans will begin in earnest after 
Easter and for almost all of us, we 
now begin to reckon time by its 
occurance before or after May my. 



LIBRARY INCREASED 
IN VOLUME BY GIFT 

Class of 1901 Adds Two Vol- 
umes to Each Department 
of the College 



The class of 1901 has very recently 
added a number of volumes to the li- 
brary. Two volumes were given to 
each department of the college curri- 
culum. These were selected with 
care and represent some of the best 
authorities on the different subjects 
treated. The volumes represent a 
real gift to the college, and they take 
this means to make known the gift, 
and to thank the class for their gen- 
erisity. 

The addition is as follows: 

Robertson— Grammar of the Greei 
New Testament. 

Robertson— Luke the Historian. 
(Continued on Fage 4) 



WALTER TO RETURN; 
REISSINGER UNABLE 



Word has been received that 
John F. Walter is recovering rap- 
idly from a nervous breakdown, 
and that he will be with us after 
Easter. The faculty and students 
are glad to hear this report. 

D. Kenneth Ressinger visited the 
college last week. We are sorry 
that he will not be able to resume 
work this year. He is suffering 
from partial paralysis of feet and 
limbs. 



ELEANOR R. SNOKE 
Y.W.CAJRESIDENT 

New President Already a Mem- 
ber of National Council 
of Y. W. C. A. 



The Y. M. C. A. of Lebanon Valley 
held the annual election of officers 
on Friday, March 18th. Miss Eleanor 
Snoke of Philadelphia was chosen to 
head the Association during the co 1- 
ing year. All other officers, with o..e 
exception, are members of the class? 
of</28. Immediately after the results 
of the election were made known, 
Miss Snoke chose her ;abinet. 

Miss Snoke has always been deep'y 
interested in Christian work on the 
campus at L. V. She has served 
three years on the Y. W. C. A cabinet 
this past year as chairman of the 
Social Committee. That her effor., 
were recognized and appreciated io 
shown in this election for the offic ■ 
of president carries with it no small 
amount of responsibility and trust. 
The Y. W. C. A. has always been 
active in all the affairs of the college. 
With Miss Snoke as the leader, co •- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



FACULTY ANNOUNCES 
NEW "LAVIE" STAFF 

Albright Chosen Editor and 
Pugh Business 
Manager 

The new La Vie staff has been ap- 
pointed, with H. Darkes Albright '28 
its Business Manager. "On paper'' 
the staff looks like a winner. With a 
very few exceptions, due to the com- 
ing point system, old staff members 
have been reappointed. 

Anna Mark '28 and Millard J. Mil- 
ler '28 will be Associate Editors. 
Miss Mark held an editorial position 
on this year's Quittie staff, while Mi. 
Miller is new in that capacity. G. 
Clifford Singley, '28, after a year'? 
experience on the Quittie staff, has 
been appointed as Athletic Reporter, 
while Miss Mary Hartz '30, a newcom- 
er with high recommendations, wi.l 
report Conservatory news. Miss 
Ruth Struthar, a member of this 
year's staff ? has been appointed Gen- 
eral Reporter, working with James C. 
Hazleton, our busy Freshman. The 
Society Reporters will be announced 
later. 

The Business Staff looks to be 
quite as efficient as the one described 
above. Mr. Pugh, although a new- 
comer on La Vie spent a busy yeai 
managing the Quittie's affairs. Ar- 
chie Lutz '29, promises to be an ener- 
getic and successful assistant to 
Pugh, while Jacob M. Horst '28, is ex- 
pecting a big year as Circulation 
Manager. 

These people should make an ex- 
celent staff. The retiring members 
unite in wishing them the best of 
success for the coming year. 



KALO/ETEANS WILL CELEBRATE GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARY TOMORROW EVENING 

Mr. William Garman Organizing President of the Society will 
Deliver an Address — A Play 
Will Feature 



MANY ALUMNI AND FRIENDS EXPECTED TO ATTEND 



TWO PROFS HAVE 

ATTACK OF GRIPPE 



Prof Derickson and Gingrich are 
on the sick list of the collet. -'. 
Both have an attack of grippe. 
Prof. Gingrich's condition appear : 
to be more serious, in that he has 
symptoms of Typhoid Pneumonia. 
It is hoped that such is not the 
case, and that they will be able to 
resume duties in a few days. Prof 
Derickson heads the Biology De- 
partment while Prof Gingrich tr>e 
Social Science Department. 



RIVAL SOCIETIES STAGE 
CLOSE CONTESTED GAME 



One of Student contested basket- 
ball game of the season was witness- 
ed on Thursday, March 24, when the 
Clionions defeated the Delphians by 
the score of 23-20. 

The game caused much excitement 
due to the two teams keeping so even- 
hatched. Each team had three of 
the varsity players and neither teair 
bad an advantage over the other. 
The Clios had quite a lead the first 
half, but the Delphians rallied near 
the end of the game, and cut down 
(Continued on Page 3) 



1927 BASEBALL 

OUTLOOK BRIGHT 

New Material to make up 
for Losses by 
Graduation 



It won't be long now. It's in the 
air. We open up our baseball sea- 
son on April 12 at G-burg. It looks 
like a good year, for twenty-five men 
answered Coach Mylin's call for base- 
ball candidates, among them six vet- 
erans from last year's team and a 
bunch of promising freshman. From 
present indications we should be rep- 
resented on the diamond by the best 
team in the last four seasons. 

Let us look over the respective de- 
partments of the game. The pitch 
(Continued on Page 3) 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 
MAKESLAST TOUR 

Club will Render Several more 
Concerts in Near- 
by Towns 



The Men's Glee Club returned yes- 
terday from a trip to the coal re- 
gions, Lykens, Tower City, and Sham 
okin being included in the tour. This 
was the first trip since the Harris- 
burg-Hanover-Red Lion one two 
weeks ago, and the last big one 0: 
the season. 

The club had charge of the church 
services in the Lykens U. B. church 
on Sunday, rendering several sacred 
numbers there. Favorable comment 
(Continued on Page 4) 



KALOS WILL HOLD 

BANQUET FOR ALUMNI 

On Saturday evening, Ap-il 9 ? at 7 
o'clock the Kalozetean Literary Soci- 
ety will hold a banquet, at Chef's 
Place, in honor of its Alumni. Cards 
have been sent to all Alumni within 
a certain radius, whose addresses are 
available. Many of these cards are 
being returned asking for reserva- 
tions for the banquet, and it is ex- 
pected that there will be a good rep- 
resentation of old Kalo men at the 
banquet. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Y.M.C.A. CABINET 

ELECTION HELD 

J. Bruce Behney to Succeed 
Wade Miller as 
President 



On Monday afternoon March 2\, 
the Y. M. C. A. held the 'annual elec- 
tion. Mr. J. Bruce Behney of Free- 
land, Pa., was elected president fot 
the ensuing year. Each class is rep- 
resented on the list of officers chosen 
who form a very well balanced sta f .. 
Several days after election the new 
cabinet was announced by the pres- 
ident elect. It includes all men who 
served on the cabinet last year an i 
again eligible, and other men who are 
filling the places vacated by the grad- 
uating class. 

Mr. Behney is a ministerial student 
of the class of '28. This will be his 
third year on the cabinet for he serv- 
ed in his Sophomore year as secretary 
and during the past jear as vice 
president. The Y. M. C. A. has made 
great strides at Lebanon Valley dur- 
ing the past several years because of 
the very capable officers which it 
has had. This as especially true of 
this past year in which it was verv 
(Continued on Pa^e 4) 



SEXTETTE FINISHES 
SEASON BY BANQUET 

Team and Guests Attend 
Theatre after Ban- 
quet at Chef's 



Tomorrow evening, April 8, the 
Kalozetean Literary Society will cele- 
brate its Golden Anniversary. The 
society was ■ started as the result of 
overcrowded society and has grown 
in fifty years, to rank with all soci- 
eties on the campus. It is attaining 
its aims ; which are, the literary train- 
ing and social culture of its members. 

As a special feature of the Golden 
Anniversary, the society has made 
arrangements to have Mr. William 
Garman, the organization president 
of the society, to be present and de- 
liver a short address as a part of the 
Friday evening program. Mr. Gar- 
man now resides in Harrisburg, 
where he is an officer in the Railroad 
Brotherhood. 

The remainder of the program has 
not been made public, except that it 
shall consist of a very interesting 
play and some musical numbers. 
Miss Mary Wallace ha sbeen workin 
hard with the cast, and the cast has 
been doing their part, so that is ex- 
pected to be a success. 

As this is the Golden Anniversary 
it is probable that there will be many 
of the alumni here for the event. 
Plans are being made to entertain 
these persons and make them feel at 
home when they return. They will 
surely be pleased to see the progress 
that has been made by the college 
in recent years. 



GO-ED DEBATERS 

FINISH SEASON 

Plan to Organize Debating 
Club in very Near 
Future 



On Friday, March 18, 1927, the co- 
ed varsity basket ball team ended 
their season by a very appropriate 
social event. A banquet held at 
Chefs Place began the evening's ac- 
tivtiies. The banquet, one of Chefs 
delicious, well prepared type, was 
enjoyed by all, giving evidence that 
no "training" was being observed. 

Kathryn Young, manager of the 
team, acted as chairman of the even- 
continued on Page 3) 



The last debate of the season was 
held March 24, with the Men's teams 
of Elizabethtown College. The nega- 
tive team, consisting of Mary Buch, 
Anna Apgar, and Esther Flickinger, 
with Janet Miller as alternate stayed 
at home to convince the affirmative 
team of Elizabethtown that the debts 
owed to us by the Allied countries 
ought not to be cancelled. At Eliza- 
bethtown .the girls suffered defeat 
tho' they debated very well and show- 
ed much improvement. The travel- 
ing team from L. V. C. consisted of 
(CoRtinued from Page 1) 



FROSH WIN HONORS 

IN INTERCLASS GAME 



The freshmen Co-eds did the un- 
expected on Saturday, March 26, 
when they defeated the Sophomore 
Sextette by the score of 27-25. 

This was indeed a surprise to every- 
one, even the freshmen. The sophs 
were picked as the better team due 
to the fact that their team included 
three varsity players. The frosh had 
only one player who participated la 
(Continued on Page 4) 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, April 7, 1927 



~iMt€$\\ty\tnt 

PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLL EGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 
WALTER L. NESS, '27 
Associate Editors 

MYRA 0. SHEAFFER, '27 MARY McLANACHAN, '27 

Conservatory -. RUTH STRUBHAR, '29 

AthMics ELMER REISER, »2h 

Clio ' "-" - - ALICE KINDT, '28 

DelphTan""^"""" KATHRYN YOUNG, '27 

Kal £ _ _ _ _ LAWRENCE DERICKSON, 'v.! 

Philo J. BRUCE BEHNEY, '28 

General EDNA C - GRAHAM, '28 

DARKES ALBRIGHT ,'28 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WADE S. MILLER, '27 

Circulation Manager CLARENCE ULRICH, '27 

Associate Business Manager RAYMOND KOCH, '28 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



College Calendar 



April 7 
6:10 P.M. — Ministerium 
7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
Meeting. 

8:00 P.M.— College Band Practice. 
April 8 

8:00 P.M.— Fiftieth Anniversary of 
Kalozetean Literary Society. 

April 10 

5:45 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Devotional 
Service. 

April 11 

4:00 P.M. — Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M. — Writers Club. 
9:00 P.M.— Men s Senate. 

April 12 

4:00 P.M. — )L. W. C. A. Cabinet 



r 



EDITORIALS 



AN ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

On a drowsv Sunday morning in late summer a soutli-bomr ' 
train discharged a single passenger, a stranger apparently, Irom 
the way his quick glance roved here and there taking m unac- 
customed surroundings. The man was of medium stature, a 
typical Englishman from his very manner suggesting a well 
disciplined mind, a will under iron control, and method beyow. 
the point of efficiency. As people are, he was of course met and 
taken to some place. It developed that he was the new prof essor 
of economics and business administration m Lebanon Valley. 

In the course of a few days the students came troupmg back 
to school to begin a new year. Here they were introduced to the 
new professor who quietly and quickly began to make his pre- 
sence felt. During the next day or two all over the campus, on 
the feminine side at least, could be heard these remarks, "Did 
you see the new prof?" "Is he married?" "He's taking Prof Gin- 
grich's economics." The last of these was only too truly realiz- 
ed as the new professor's reputation among the students was soon 
established. Great was the astonishment when one evening i* 
was rumored that he was coaching the girls basket ball team. 
Evidently he knew quite a bit about basket ball for under hi 
able guidance the team won six and lost four. 

But this little Scotchman's pep, energy, bundle of surprise 
were not nearly exhausted as yet, for with the unexpected 
announcement of girls' gym classes a sensation greater if possi 
ble than any he had created before was now brought about 
The improbable had happened. A long cherished ambition wa; 
realized. Gym classes for girls which have proved both help 
ful and healthful are now on the curriculum of L. V. all througl 
the kindness of one professor who sees much that needs be done 
and does it. 

Perhaps we could no longer be surprised for we had grow: 
to expect most anything, but we were delighted when we fount 
out that Professor Stokes was backing our girls debating team 
It's success too was no doubt largely due to him. 

Lebanon Valley wishes to take this opportunity to extend 
their thanks and appreciation to the gentleman who has so abb- 
seen the need on our campus and who has made that need a 
realization. 



NOTEBOOKS 

What kind of a note book do you have? One of those whicl 
no one can understand and which has scarcely anything in it 
or do you have a well organized, and legible one with something 
worthwhile in it? Did you ever stop to consider that just as 
your notebook is in school so you might be in life? It is wise 
to refrain from negligence and carelessness here if you wish to 
do so later. Look at your notebook and thnik it over! 



NOTHING BUT ROADS 

We are road-builders as the Romans were. We experimen 
every day with new surfacing and new beds. If there is a wrinkl 
in the asphalt, a craeffc in the concrete, our complaints are loin 
We drive cars, large and small, polished or dull, all upholstered 
Rubber tires and steel springs add to our comfort. We don' 
care what the countryside is like so long as the roads are good 
Come on, come on! We don't care where we're going, but we're 
going. 

Each one of us must have a dwelling somewhere alonq- tin 
roadside. But we give it little care. We only sleep there. Wherf 
then can we go? Have we made no beautiful places to which 
our roads can lead us? Of what use are our roads if they do not 
take us to some place where we want to go? 

Oho, education is a fine thing. It is the highway of the work 
It gives us method, it teaches us to think. Of what use is think- 
ing if it brings us to no conclusions? Of what use are facts 1 
they bring us to no philosophy of action? Are we to ride up and 
down forever, intellectual tramps, without a home where we can 
welcome our friends or give shelter to the traveller? 

The New Student. 



meeting. 
0:10 r.M- 

4:00 P.M.- 



-Student Prayer Meeting. 

April 13 
-Easter vacation Begins. 



Alumni Notes 



4.,— — — — * 

Francis D. Beidel, A.B., '20, has 
been teaching at Enola .since gradu- 
ation. Upon the resignation of Prut- 
esbor Qemrmli, Mr. Jseiaei was pro- 
moted principal of Enoia schools. His 
nonor is well merited. 

William IN. Martin, A.B., '18, A.M. 
22, served as principal of the Leba- 
non Vaiiey Academy tor two years. 
tie then went as a missionry to Af- 
rica wnere he became the principal 
of Albert Academy, Freetown, bierie 
i^eone, Vv est Axrica. The woiK tnei e 
auvanced rapiuiy unaer his airecci ■ w 
i,ast June tney with their two cnila- 
ren, Grace and faul, came home on 
a furlough. As conditions lor tneo- 
return to Africa did not seem favor- 
able for the near future, Irrotesscr 
Martin has accepted the position ol 
teacher of science in the Enola High 
School. 



The debating teams of Elizabeth, 
town College have set up an enviably 
record. To date their varsity teams 

ave appeared in seventeen debates 
and won all but three of that num. 

er. An extensive tour is now beinp 
arranged for the debaters and they 
will travel through Virginia, Mary. 

and and West Virginia. 



Faster brim's an array of beautiiui spring hats and dresses 
for tne ame ui & our nation and even .Nature or esses up lor mis 
oav 01 ioy anu peace, ine mrus carol a Happy spring song an, 
me duus on tne trees and novvers burst open to greet me sunrise 
lenow jonciuins, uanodiis, anu brignt colored tulips nod in a 
Irie mTy manner iroin every uoor yard. Yviiat a joy it is to live 
S Z. But there is a ueeper, holier tliougnt connec tea 
m taster. ^ is me Kesunecuon W 01 ^^If^ 
me that we mignt nave me anu nav e it more aDuimanUy . Ais 
Ais returmction uemunstrates to us mat lite can be victorious 
o^r deatn ana mat wnen we reave tins lite we only go on to live 
a ricner, mner one over mere m mat ureat i^eyona- ine ve 
^tmospnere ol me season commemorates me most 
event Known to mam Liie, an about us Durscing lortn 1, reviv 
U1S irom its ueaumKe appearance ol winter ana is burbling 101 m 
mlo new lite ana oeauty. bo are we, in our lives Here on eartn 
uieuarmg ourselves 101 a greataer me 111 neaven. Hvery act 
tliouo-nt or ueeu accomplished means either a suutraction irom o. 
an auuiuon to mat ine across tne Ureat uiviue. net us ea.cn 
took up 111 our Hie tins spring ana, wim me promise 01 mat bet 
ter ine take a new interest ana iiuid on our work mat we may 
better be prepared not oniy lor me luture nere on eartn but tor, 
mat r uture mat no man reany knows ol its capacity, w e oni.v 
Have tne words ol Jesus: T am tne resurrection and tne me, 
ne mat beiievetii 111 Me, tliougii He were deau yet snail lie live. 



The people who are tiie Head ol certain organizations firm 
it hard to carry 011 ail the work themselves, yet it is haruer to get 
s omc peopie to cooperate. H some student is asked to make a 
snort talk he is surprised ana answers that he can not taiK, mat 
he never couia ana to piease ask someone else. Hie same thing 
is true ol many peopie wnen tney are askeu to write a slio.t 
account oi a Happening-, ihey say that tney will ten you or 
someone else the lacts but they can not write it all themselves 
Now we ieei sorry lor such peopie because really their case is 
pathetic- What good is a conege course to any stuuent H he can 
not write a short article 011 a tiling that has Happened and they 
have witnessed.'' Or what uo they think their tongues were 
given to them for H it was not to talk ana to express certain 
iaeas or truths they Have learned? 

It seems that by the time a boy or girl lias reached the col 
le^e age that he would at least try to speak or write- What kind 
of citizens are we going to be when we get out oi school it we 
are afraid even to try to do some of the things that are hard, 
There is scarcely any one who can stand before an audience and 
not at some time or other feel nervous. Yet this person does not 
give up speaking because once he fost control— he keeps trying 
until he is able to speak with poise and not show that he is 
excited. 

People who are asked to write articles for La Vie Collegienne 
forget that anyone is liable to make mistakes but think they arc 
the only ones who ever do. They forget that they do not have 
to sign their names at the end of the article and also that then 
fellow students probably never know who wrote the article 
Those who never try never get anywhere. Unless an effort i 
put forth we are sure to stay in the same spot and die of dry rot 



L. V. C. A. A BASE BALL SCHEDULE FOR SEASON OF 1927 

Tuesday, April 12— GETTYSBURG Away 

Wednesday, April 20— SCHUYLKILL Away 

Thursday, April 21— JUNIATA At Home 

Wednesday, April 27— LAFAYETTE Awaj 

Saturday, April 30— SCHUYLKILL At Horn 

Saturdav, May 7— WESTERN MARYLAND At Hohk 

Tuesday, May 10— MT. ST. MARY'S Awav 

Wednesday, May 11— GEORGETOWN Away 

Saturday, May 14 — MT. ST. MARY'S At Horn 

Wednesday, May 18— MUHLENBURG Awa 

Saturday, May 21— F. & M. At Horn 

Wednesday, May 25— SUSOUEHANNA Awav 

Saturday, May 28— SUSQUEHANNA At Horn 

Monday, May 30— ALBRIGHT At Horn 

Thursday, June 2— JUNIATA Awa 

Friday, June 3— PENN STATE Away 

Saturday, June 4 — BUCKNELL Away 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



Five undergraduates A/ere si.rty. 
marily dismissed from the University 
of Georgia by Chancellor Charles M. 
Snelling after a faculty committee 
found them guilty of publishing a 
paper deemed "grossly discourteous" 
and "probably libelous."' The five 
students made up the staff of The 
Iconoclast, an independent student 
publication. The Iconoclast came in- 
to being because of allegedly undua 
faculty pressure on the editors 
The Red and Black, official student 
paper, and in order to discuss certain 
university questions that the student 
paper refused to treat. 

— The Mew Student 



Princeton still moves on wheels de- 
spite faculty ruling barring automo- 
biles. Several members of the junior 
were roller-skating to their classes 
and to various clubs on Prospect 
Street recently. One determined 
junior appeared with a placard on bu 
back, proclaiming, "They haven't 
banned this yet." Another bore a 
sign reading, "Is this an automobile? 



A sex war is on at Oxford i com- 
petent observers declare. From tine 
to time the Isis, the men's journal, 
comes out with an indictment of the 
policy of harboring women in the 
ancient citidel of men. Ever since 
women have been admitted to the 
University the men have been hosti 1 . 

Jealousy is the motive of the me\ 
the women declare. Every woman at 
the college is an honors student. So 
rigid is the examination system tha'; 
none but the most intellectual girls 
pass the gauntlet. One Summervill? 
girl recently said that for the eighty 
vacancies at her college last autumn 
there were 240 applicants. It is ex- 
tremely irritating to the men, many 
of whom are content with merely the 
pass degree, that they should be out- 
shone intellectually by mere women. 

—The New Student 



At New Yark University the ag- 
gregated students' earnings for the 
year exceeds $13,000. More than 
eighteen thousand of the 28,813 stu- 
dents work while attending college. 
Many students serve as substitute ac- 
tors in Broadway theaters. 



President Ernest Hopkins of Dart- 
mouth has a plan for saving college 
football both from its defenders who 
shut their eyes to imminent "dangers 
and from its enemies who would an- 
nihilate it altogether. In a letter to 
the president of the Dartmouth Ath- 
letic Council he outlines his proposal 
for saving the sport from its mil?" 
alleged excesses. 

The three following changes are 
suggested by President Hopkins: 

First, eligibility for participate 1 
in intercollegiate football on varsity 
teams to be limited to men in their 
sophomore and junior years in col- 
lege; 

Second, intercollegiate football con- 
tests in the major games of the sched- 
ule to be arranged on a recipi'° c ^ 
basis, by which each college should 
develop from the varsity squad tW^J 
major teams > one of which should 
play at home, and the other of whi^ h 
should play on the rival's hom e 
ground; 

Third all coaching to be done by 
undergraduates, presumably by sen 
iors who had acquired knowledge a n 
experience during their participate • 
in intercollegiate athletics previously* 
—The New Stude • 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, April 7, 1927 



PAGE THREE 



osoi 
iieh 

are 

tion 

sity 
heir 
col- 

».oi;- 
ieo- 
jcal 
>uld 
W° 
>uld 
iieh 

by 

3 en- 
art<* 
Lion 

isiy- 



CO-ED DEBATERS 

IN INTERCLASS GAME 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Corinne Dyne Hilda Heller and Hilda 
Hess, with Mary Ax as alternate. 

During the season undoubtedly the 
most successful season Lebanon Val- 
ley College has ever had in debating, 
the girls debated the girl's teams oi 
Ursinus and Schuylkill and the men's 
feams of Albright and Elizabethtown. 
They were unable to defeat the la- 
dies' teams, but the men's teams were 
glad to "split even" in the decisions 
rendered. 

The debating season in one sense is 
closed— but in a true sense it is only 
begun. The girls have developed suf- 
ficient interest both in Faculty am". 
Student Body to convince all that 
truly the real fruition of this year'.? 
season will but begin to blossom. So 
that the progress of this year may 
not be lost, the students are about to 
face the opportunity to organize a 
Debating Club. The aim of the club 
is to develop an interest in Platform 
Debating and Genuine Debaters. Al- 
bright and Elizabethtown, perhaps 
two of the best teams in the State 
had to acknowledge that they had 
met their equal. This was done by 
eight girls and only a few of the 
Faculty members. , Our aim is to get 
both boys and girls interested. The 
Faculty have pledged their support 
to next year's teams. With this sup- 
port, a chance to begin now, and the 
student body organized, Lebanon 
Valley College will go on record next 
year, not only as having her most 
successful year, but proud of the fact 
that her representatives have cap- 
tured coveted decisions from the best 
debating teams in the State. 

At the time of this writing^ we are 
unable to state definitely when the 
club will be organized. Listen for 
announcements. Talk about it. 
Above all — let's begin right. The idea 
for organizing this year is merely to 
get organized, elect officers and se- 
lect delegates to next year's Inter- 
Collegiate Debating Convention, and 
to keep alive the interest that is be- 
ing manifest. 

The teams are indebted to their 
coaches Prof. C. R. Gingrich and 
Prof. M. L. Stokes. We wish to ex- 
press our gratitude to them in this 
manner and also all others of the 
Faculty who aided much in giving 
advice, and information, acting as 
chairmen, and giving to us the moral 
support that beginners so much need. 
The "School Spirit" was excellent. 
We expect more when we are more 
mature and are able to give better 
debates. The progress of Lebanon 
Valley Debating rests on the Student 
Body. Let's organize — and make our 
school boast of doing no less in this 
field of activitise than similar insti- 
tutions. 



1927 BASEBALL 

OUTLOOK BRIGHT 



(Continued from page 1) 

jing staff, which has been weak in 
the past few seasons ; is greaetly bol- 
stered this year by the appearance of 
Zappia, Hagar and Lebo who will be 
a great help to pitching staff. A'- 
eran left over from last year. Al- 
though having not yet pitched to riv - 
al batsmen, they seem to have a world 
of stuff in the preliminary workouts, 
but their fate is yet to be decided. 
The catching department is well 
taken care of by Metoxen, a veteran 
of several seasons and Bendigo, a 
fine backstop from the freshman 
class. Both these men can hit the 
ball, although Metoxen is of the mon- 
ied hitter type. The infield has Capt. 
Smith at third-base, Gelbert at short 
and Piersol at first-base from last 
year's team. These three men each 
bave several seasons' experience and 
are well able to take care of their re- 
spective positions. Wentz, who is ar. 
outfielder, also makes a valuable util- 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



HEMPERLY ELECTED MIRIAM DAUGH LRTY 

KALO PKi^biDEN l DELPHIAN PRESIDENT 



On Friday evening, April 1, Kaio 
enjoyed, a very interesting program, 
it was just the sort o± program that 
is able to banish the spring lever. 
The opening leature was a pianu 
duet, by Kiehner and Hater, who be- 
came famous ior their music wniie on 
a recent trip with the glee ciub. The 
auuience was then carried back to 
Holland by a Dutch reacting, which 
was wed renuered by Russell Bech- 
tel. The next number a violin duet 
by Lewars and Shroyer, was much 
appreciated by the society, and the 
artists were called upon lor an en- 
core. The entertainment was com- 
plete with the review of modern 
plays, which was well presented by 
JNorman Vanderwall, an able critic. 

Alter the regular session a business 
meeting was held, at which time the 
oliicers for the spring term were in- 
stalled. On account of the illness of 
vVohn Waitei, who had previously 
been elected to serve that term as 
president, it was necessary to elect 
a man to serve in his placej William 
Hemperiy was selected for the office, 
and was installed by the retiring pres- 
ident, James Gordon Starr. Mr. Hem- 
periy has always been an active and 
loyal member of the society, and has 
given his brothers many interesting 
lectures. He delivered a short in- 
augural address > expressing his de- 
sires for the future success of the so- 
ciety and asking for cooperation ana 
suggestions from all members. He 
then installed his staff of officers, 
who are as follows: Vice president, 
Roy Flook; Recording Secreary, Pal- 
mer E. Poff; Corresponding Secre- 
tary, Archie Lutz-, Treasurer, Walter 
Waggoner; Critic, Wayne Sparrow; 
Pianist, John Bixler; Chaplin, Wil- 
liam Blatt; and Sergt.-at-Arms, Mi- 
chael Toronto. 



ity infielder ( along with Hendricks, a 
freshman, who has shown promise 
during the early training. Gelbert 
led the team in hitting last year and 
with another season back of him 
should prove a valuable man to bat 
fourth in the batting order. Piersol 
and Smith, while not strong hitters, 
are able to hit the ball with fair con- 
sistency. There should be a great 
fight for outfield posts. This depait- 
ment like the pitching staff has beer- 
weak the last few seasons, especially 
in batting. Wentz is practically sure 
of his old job in left-field. The other 
positions will be filled from Albright, 
Piela, Hagar and Zappia. All these 
men are pitchers but Abright, but 
each one is able to hold down an out- 
field post in creditable manner. Pieh 
played center-field last season when 
not pitching, and in all likelihood 
will fill the same garden this season. 
From the form shown in batting 
practice they all are able to sock the 
apple. And in present day baseball 
that is what wins ball games. 

The schedule this year calls foi 
more home games than ever before 
so that the student body will get 
plenty of opportunity to see the team 
in action. Let's make up our minds 
now that we are going to support the 
team, which looks to be the best in 
the past few years. 



SEXTETTE FINISHES 

SEASON BY BANQUET 



and 



(Continued from Page 1) 
ing. With fitting expressions 
bits of humor, she introduced each 
speaker. Dr. Gossard, in his toast, 
complimented the team and their 
coach for their success and wished 
them success in the coming year. 
Prof. Stokes, the coach praised the 
girls for their success and good 



In Delphian Hall on Friday even 
ing, April 1, an appropriate program 
was given as follows: 

April Fool Mary McLar.achan 

April Laughter Winifred PecK 

Several April Gems_ Mildred Urnholt/ 

April Voices Ruth Strubhar 

Resolved — That April Fools' Day is 

beneficial to the community. 

The following spring term officers 
were recently elected: 

President, Miriam Daugherty; Vice- 
President, Mary McLanachan; Corre- 
sponding Secretary, Mildred Um- 
holtz; Recording Secretary Irene 
Schell; Critic, Kathryn Wheeler; 
Chaplain, Kathryn Flinchbaugh; 
Warden, Ruth March; Treasurer, Es- 
ther Flickinger; Pianist^ Violet Feree 



IMPROMPTU PROGRAM 

RENDERED BY CLIO 



April 1st is All Fool j Day and Clio 
celebrated in a perfectly satisfactory 
manner. An impromptu program 
proved delightful without the worry 
and fuss which goes with a prepared 
entertainment. It was altogether 
foolish. The following numbers were 
rendered: 

Fools Fantasies (Piano Solo) 

Mildred Myers 
How to Lead a Fool's Life (Speech) 

Mary McCurdy 

Thunderstorm (Duet) 

Eleanor Snoke, Leah Miller 

Folly of Youth (Speech) 

Hazel Bailey 

Tricks of Memory (Reading) 

Madeline Rife 
In a Spring a Young's Man's Fancy 
(Sketch) Emma Shaeffer 



sportsmanship and Mr. Rack and Mr. 
Metoxin for their assistance. Other 
toasts were given by Nellie Raben- 
stine, our captain; Emma Myer, our 
captain for the coming season; and 
Janet Miller, our new manager. The 
party then drove to Harrisburg. 
where they attended the State The- 
atre. 

This social event was an opportu- 
nity for the team to show their ap- 
preciation of the kindness of mem- 
bers of the faculty and others who 
aided in making the season a suc- 
cess. Those who attended the ban- 
quet were Dr. and Mrs. G. D. Gos- 
sard; Dr. and Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace; 
Prof, and Mrs. C. R. Gingrich; Prof. 
M L. Stokes; Raymond Koch; Nellie 
Rabenstine; Madaline Mark; Kathryn 
Young; Emma Myer; Olga Freeman; 
Mabel Hafer; Sarah Lou Rose; Anna 
Mark; Mildred Lane; Edna Gorski 
Nancy Ulrich; Janet Miller; Irene 
Miller; Carol Brinser; Janie Lee Bor- 
den; Ruth March; Gladys Buffington. 



KALOS WILL HOLD 

BANQUET FOR ALUMNI 



(Continued from Page 1) 

The program will be by Alumni 
men, except for our president's ad- 
dress, by William Hemperiy. Dr. A. 
S. Lehman, of the Derry Street 
Church, Harrisburg, will be the toast- 
master. Other Kaloes, who have gam- 
ed reputation since their graduation 
will bf» present and take part on the 
program. A special menu is being ar- 
ranged by Chef, and all things point 
toward a delightful time. 

The matter of an anniversary ban- 
quet is new on the campus, but it is 
hoped by the society that many 
more will be required in the future. 
It will be an occasion for the present 
members to meet the former mem- 
bers, and to learn of some important 
events in the societies history. 



PHILOS PRESENT ALL 

1 OOLS DAY PnOGRAM 



Philo held a very interesting All 
Fools' Day program on Friday even- 
ing, April 1, in Philo hall. The num- 
bers on the paino, with one or two 
exceptions, were impromptu. A gcoa 
deal of humor was expressed 
throughout the program. 

Mr. Albert Kelchner, president of 
Philo, delivered a well prepared 
speech on "The Origin of April Fools' 
Day." He was followed by an im- 
promptu by Mr. Carl Sloat on "April 
Showers Bring May Flowers." Of 
course, the program could not have 
been complete without our peer ol 
orators, Mr. Francis J. Marshall, Jr 
being called upon. His impromptu 
speech was entitled "Joe Bass," a 
term closely connected with April 
Fool. Mr. Milford Knisely, our hum- 
orist, livened up the program with 
the presentation of a number of cur- 
rent jokes. The program then took 
a more serious trend and Mr. Harry 
Stone delivered a very interesting 
and well prepared talk on "Wart, 
Beginning in April." An impromptu 
debate followed this on the question, 
"Resolved, that April 1st is a Foolish 
Day." The affirmative was upheld 
by Mr. Paul Moser and the negative 
by Mr. Millard Miller. The judged 
decision was in favor of the negative 
speaker "who proved his arguments 
by the point that it is not the day 
that is foolish but the people. M». 
Samuel Meyers concluded the pro 
gram with a talk on "What April 
Means to Me." 

After the literary session a business 
meeting of Philo was hed in wlhich 
meeting of Philo was held in which 
be the Philo reporter to the La Vie 
Collegienne during the coming year. 



RIVAL SOCIETIES STAGE 
CLOSE CONTESTED GAME 



(Continued from Page 1) 
the margin to three points. Raben- 
stine was the star of the game. 

The line-up. 

Meyer Forward Lane 

Rabenstine Forward Evans 

I. Miller Center J. Miller 

Freeman Side Center Gorski 

Mark Guard Cochran 

Borden Guard Fencil 

Field goals— Meyer 4; Rabenstine 
5; Lane 5; Evans 1; Fouls— Raben- 
stine 5; Lane 8. 

Substitutions — March for J. Miller. 

Refree — Metoxen. 



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Studio and Home Portraits 
Films Printed and Developed 
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Lebanon, Pa. 



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4 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, April 7, 1927 



Kampus Kracks j 



Eggie Shroyer wondered why thev 
called an "L" Club initiation a 
"Board Meeting" — until he got there! 



Y.M.C.A. CABINET 

ELECTION HELD 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

MAKES LAST TOU^ 



LIBRARY INCREASED 

IN VOLUME BY GIFT 



Someone 
Reported that 
Ambrose 
Meyers is 
Dabbling 
In 

Real Estate 
Since he 
Is in 
Florida. 

That's probably 

So,— 

He would 

Like to play 

In the 

Sand! 



"CHUBBY": What did you think 
of those trained pigs we saw in the 
show? 

"CUE-BALL": I though they were 
a bunch of hams. 



HAFER: Would you have Muriel 
for Kalo Anniversary? 
LEBO: No, Havana. 



SENIOR (sternly): Is that your 
cigarette stub? 

FROSH (on Campus): Go ahead— 
you saw it first. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

successful due to the efficient leader- 
ship of the retiring president. Mr. 
Wade Miller. Its growth is also due 
in a large measure to the fact jbhut 
this year each student at L. V. C. wf 
required to be a member of the 
Christian organization. After the 
very favorable record made by the 
Association during the past year, Mr. 
Behney has a very cheerful outlook 
in the work of the Y. and it is expect- 
ed by everyone that the 'Christian 
work, as far as the Y. M. C. A. is 
concerned, will continue in a very 
satisfactory manner. The other offi- 
cers chosen are: 

Langston Mentzer '29__Vice president 

Henry Aungst '29 Secretary 

James Hazleton '30 Treasurer 

The members of the cabinet and 
the departments of which they are 
the head are: 

Elmer Keiser '28 Literature 

Arnold Zwally '28 Reporter 

Roy Flook '28 Finance 

Millard Miller '28 Social 

Daniel Pugh '28 Star Course 

Henry Brubaker '28 Building 

Clifford Singley '28 Athletics 

Miles Kiehner '29 Devotions 

Russel Oyer '29 

Music and Deputation 

It is planned to hold the anndul 
installation of officers in conjunction 
with the Y. W. C. A. installation of 
vices on Thursday evening, April 7th 
Immediately after the installation o± 
officers of both Associations prepar 
ations will be begun toward the 
annual May Day exercises. 



Dear Editor: 

I am in love with Barney Whale, 
but I am afraid he has a pretty girl 
at Hagerstown. 

Anxiously yours, 

Bettye Dollar. 
Answer: — Don't worry. Such a 
case is impossible! 



EMPLOYER: How many in your 
family? 

MARY McCURDY (applying for a 
job): Three. 
EMPLOYER: Are you the oldest? 
MARY: No, my father. 



Joe Athlete says it's a good thing 
they cheer when a player gets hurt — 
the girls can't hear what he is saying. 



HEATH: A fellow down the street 
openly admitted he had no brains. 

VAUGHN: What was wrong with 
him? 

HEATH: Nothing. He was a 
butcher. 



A FAIRY TALE 

(Memoirs of a Recent Glee Club 
Trip) 

Once upon a time there was a Jun 
ior who liked to laugh at the boys 
who had to wear green caps. One 
day he went far away, with some 
other boys on a trip to sing — or some 
thing. All the boys were eating their 
lunch at a Y. M. C. A. Cafeteria 
when he — late, as usual — thundered 
in the room, looking quite hungry 
(No, dear children, I can't tell yoo 
his name, for then Jitney 7/ould be 
terribly cross.) Several of his dear 
boy friends soon told him how to 
secure his lunch and it wasn't lonti 
until he had gathered quite a suffi 
cient meal. But, or, how the othei 
children clapped their hands in glee 
when he tried to pay for his lunch 
with his Y. M. C. A. card. The 

'ughty boys must have thought he 
wore a green cap! 

the dollinck bebby — et opp de 
v oon proon juss! 



(Continued from pagel) 

on the program came from many 
sources and considerable appreciation 
was shown the club for its appear- 
ance in the U. B. Sunday School and 
church. The Tower City and Sha- 
mokin concerts were also very suc- 
cessful. 

On the preceding trip the club 
broadcasted from the Lion Theatre, 
Station W K B G, Red Lion, Penn- 
sylvania. The theatre was packed to 
the doors, almost 1500 being present. 
This was the first radio experience of 
the year, but will not be the last. 
The boys also had charge of the serv- 
ices at U. B. church on the Sunday 
they visited Red Lion. J. Bruce Beh- 
ney '28 preached the sermon and the 
club appeared several times with sa- 
cred numbers. It was on this trip, 
while visiting York, that Brubakei 
discovered several new uses for a Y. 
M. C. A. card. 

The members of the club heard 
the pleasant announcement that Mr. 
Walters will return to school. Al- 
though it is very improbable that he 
will appear in any of the remain- 
ing concerts, his presence on the 
campus will greatly bolster the mor- 
ale of the club. These two trips com- 
plete the list of the longer tours, but 
several concerts remain to be given 
in nearby towns. 



ELEANOR R. SNOKE 

Y.WCA. PRESIDENT 



(Continued from Page 1) 

tinued progress and success are an- 
other officers chosen are: 

Alice Kindt '28 Vice Presiden 

Elsie Reider '28 Secretary 

Mary Geyer '28 Treasurer 

Mildred Unholtz '29 Pianist 

These officers form a very efficiem 
staff and will undoubtedly prove 
successfully working group. 

The cabinet chosen by Miss Snoke 
includes: 

Chairman of Meetings Rubie See '28 

Chairman of Social Emma Sheaffer '29 
Chairman of World Fellowship 

Ruth Strut har 

Chairman of Interest Group 

Nelr.a '-'pat/. '28 

Chairman of Freshman Commission 

Ruth Cooper '30 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



FROSH WIN HONORS 

FINISH SEASON 



(Continued from page 1) 

Guthmann— Analysis of Financial 
Statements. 

Sprague — Accountancy and Invest- 
ment. 

Baly — Spectroscopy, v. 1. 

Mellor — Inorganie and Theoretical 
Chemistry v. 2. 

Stoke — Epistolae Obscurorum Vir- 
orum. 

Hyma — The Christian Renaissance. 

National History of France 6 v. 

Towler — Social Life of Rome in the 
Age of Cicero. 

Allen— Life of Poe. 

James — Psychology 2 v. 

Allschiller-Court — College Geom- 
etry. 

Soddy — Interpretation of Radium. 

Barrow — Light, Photometry and Il- 
lumination. 

Campbell — Outline of Plant Geog- 
raphy. 

Eldridge — Organization of Life. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
any varsity game. This was Miss 
Borden. She proved to be the star 
for the frosh and won the game fo«: 
them. 

Borden Forward Miller 

Movion Forward Lane 

March Center Miller 

Weigell Side Center ___ Unholtz 

Horst Guard Brinser 

Showers Guard Gorski 

Field goals: Auerly 1; Lane 9; 
Bordner 8; Movion 1; Evans 1; 
Fouls: Lane 5; Bordner 7; 
Substitutions- Ouerly for Miller, Mill- 
er for Umholtz, Evans for Movion. 



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Good Things To Eat 

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Bowling and Billiards 




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LIGHT LUNCH 
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CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

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BOOKS and STATIONERY 



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DON'T FORGET 
PHILO ANNIVERSARY 
NEXT WEEK 




Wit Colkaietnrc 



SUPPORT THE 

HOME GLEE 
CLUB CONCERT 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOLUME II 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, APRIL 28, 1927 



NUMBER 12 



PHILOS WILL CELEBRATE SIXTIETH 

ANNIVERSARY ON EYE OF MAY DAY 

Dramatic Entertainment, Coached by Dr. Wallace, Will Feature 
— Reception Will Follow the Program, Which 
Promises to be Best in Years 



MANY PHILO ALUMNI AND FRIENDS EXPECTED 



Plans are almost completed for the 
celebration of the Sixtieth Anniver- 
sary of the Philokosmian Literary 
Society which will occur on Friday 
evening, May 6 A pleasing program 
has been arranged for the dramatic 
entertainment in the Engle Conser- 
vatory at 8 o'clock, and while no de- 
finite announcement has yet been 
made concerning the early evening 
diversion, a play will feature. 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallcee is training 
the cast of the play in their parts 
and this feature number will be pre- 
ceded by a varied program which 
will include several numbers °.nd 
addresses. 

Preparations are being made to ac- 
comodate the large number of alumni 
and friends who will attend the ann- 
ual gala affair of Philo. After sixty 
years of growth, the active members 
of the society will attempt to show 
the members of a bygone day that 
(Continued on Page 4) 



LOCAL BOYS AT 
F&MJCONFERENCE 

College Y.M.C.A. Problems Dis^ 
cussed at Lancaster 
Meeting 



From last Thursday evening until 
Sunday noon, (April 21-24) a district 
conference was held at Franklin and 
Marshall College. As representatives 
from Lebanon Valley College, Behney. 
Mentzer, Aungst and Flook attended. 

The conference was primarily for 
officers but it dealt with the whole 
of the College Y. M. C. Several out- 
standing men were secured as speak- 
ers for the conference. 

There is a highly commended-move- 
ment on foot to change the college 
Y. M's. from state supervision to a 
special college department which will 
devote all its time to the colleges in 
respective national areas. It is 
reasoned that under this plan all 
colleges will have better cooperataion 
from the National Y. M. C. A. This 
change was also discussed at the con- 
ference. It ; s believed that the plan 
will be accepted by the colleges. 



Subjecting all class, society, 

or individual prejudices to an ever 
greater cause, we will present for 
your consideration problems and 
movements vital to our campus 
and frequently to others as well. 
We expect to be frank — and in- 
vite you to be the same. All sign- 
ed letters sent to the editor for 
publication will be used, without 
disclosing the writer's name, if 
that desire is expressed. Let us 
hear from you! 

FROM TO-DAYS EDITORIAL 
SEE PAGE TWO 



KALO ANNIVERASARY 
BANQUET A SUCCESS 

Innovation Introduced This 
Year To Become A 
Tradition 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
held its Golden Anniversary banquei 
at the Chef's place, on the evening 
of April 9 at 7 o'clock. Besides the 
active Kalos many friends and Alum- 
ni as well as some faculty members 
of our brother society were present. 

After the relishing of a delicious 
menu prepared by Chef we were in 
an appropriate mood to listen to 
some toasts by Kalo Alumni and Dr. 
Wallace and Dr. Wagner of the fac- 
ulty. The toastmaster was Dr. A. S. 
Lehman of Harrisburg. By his wit •. 
but meaningful remarks he kept his 
hearers in a very attentive attitude 
and made them anxious for more. The 
toasts by Dr. H. E. Miller of Lebanon, 
Prof. C. E. Roudabush, of Minersville, 
Rev. Geo. Hallman of Hummelstown, 
were interesting to the highest degree. 
The program for the evening is as 
follows: 

(Continued on Page 4) 



L.Y. DROPS OPENER 
bUT WlNSNEXT TWO 

G-burg Takes One, But Schuyl- 
kill and Juniata Lose 
to Mylinmen 

Gettysburg, April 12. 

Lebanon Valley opened her base- 
ball season with a loss, dropping tne 
first game to Gettysburg 14-11. Leb- 
anon Valley enjoyed a three run leaa 
for four innings. In the first Al- 
bright doubled, Wentz got on base 
on an error and Gelbert's Ruthian 
swat accounted for three runs. Piela 
weakened in the fourth and four 
G-burg runs dented the plate. The 
scoring for the rest of the game was 
nip and tuck. A base on balls, hits 
by Gelbert, Bendigo, Piela and Piersol 
pushed across four runs in the sixth. 
Lebanon Valley bunched hits for 
three runs in the eighth. Gettysburg 
managed to score every inning after 
the fourth, bunching hits in the fourth 
and sixth for a total of nine runs. 



CONTEST PLANS 

ARE COMPLETED 

Next "Chat Book" to Announce 
Winners of Writers' 
Club Contest 



PLANS FOR MAY 

DAY ARE BEGUN 

Committee Planning Gala Af- 
fair — Miss Wallace 
to Direct 



On Saturday, May 7, Lebanon Val- 
ley College and her friends will take 
a step into the past, when the Y. M. 
and Y. W., working with Miss Wal- 
lace, will attempt to show the glories 
of one of the lirst May Days after the 
Restoration. The plan is to copy 
some particular May Day celebration, 
and the committee is using one that 
took place in a small village on the 
outskirts of London in 1660, the first 
year after the Restoration of Charles 
II to the throne of England. 

Co-Chairmen of May Day Com- 
mittee—Eleanor Snoke, Bruce Beh- 
ney, Madeline Rife, Sec. 

Faculty Advisors— Mrs. Green, Miss 
Engle, Miss Wallace, Prof. Bennett, 
Prof. Ritchie, Prof. Wagner. 

Entertainment Committee— Darkes 
Albright, Chairman, Alice Kindt. 
Platform and Ground Committee — 
Sam Meyers Chairman, Calvin Keene, 
Howard Allen. 

Decoration Committee — Frances 
Long Chairlady, Jacob Horst. 

Processional — Jimmie Starr. 

Finance Committee— Roy Flook. 

Costume Committee— Mary Geyer 
Chairlady, Alice Woy. 

Refreshment Committee — Arnold 
Zwalley, Chairman, Madeline Rife. 

Program and Tickets — Henry 
Aungst. 



The Writers' Club of Lebanon 
Valley College closed the contest for 
the writing of short stories and par- 
odies on Monday, April 25 The win- 
ners will be announced later, when 
the judges, Miss Mary K. Wallace of 
the English department of Lebanon 
Valley College, Mr. Alfred K. Mills, 
and Miss Mary E. Clemens, teacher 
of English in Hershey High School 
have made their decision. 

The prize for the best story is 
five dollars and two dollars for the 
best parody. Both will be published 
in the Chat Book together with a few 
parodies and stories receiving honor- 
able mention. The money was made 
available through the sale of the first 
edition of the Chat Book. 

Committees have been appointed to 
work on the second edition of the 
Chat Book which is going to appear 
in May. The club is anticipating 
the same splendid support which it 
has been receiving. 



ANNUAL RECITAL 
DATES ANNOUNCED 

Miss Engle Planning Spring 
Recitals for Conserva- 
tory Students 



Miss Ruth Engle, head of the Con- 
servatory of Music of Lebanon Val- 
ley College, has arranged a number 
of spring recitals to be given by the 
more advanced students of the con- 
servatory during the month of May. 
The programs will consist of organ, 
piano, and voice numbers. 

The schedule is as follows: 
Thursday, May 13. 

Benetta Burrier, Soprano; Grace 

Daniel, Piano; Viola Wolf. Organ. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



KALO GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY FITTING 

GLiMAX TU HFTY YEARS' ACTIVITY 

Clemence Dane's "A Bill of Divorcement" Features Friday 
Night's Entertainment — New Illuminated Emblem 
Displayed For First Time 



CHAPEL AND GYM DECORATTIONS EXCEPTIONAL 



GIRLS GLEE CLUB 
TUJKAVEL SOON 

Several Concerts Planned for 
Nearby Towns in 
Near Future 



The girl's Eurydice Choral Club of 
Lebanon Valley College, under the 
direction of Miss Ruth Engle, will 
give several out of town concerts in 
the coming weeks. Their first ap- 
pearance will be in the Seventh 
Street Lutheran Church at Lebanon 
on Tuesday, April 26. They will also 
sing at Palmyra Friday, April 29, 
Lancaster May 13, and Harrisburg 
May 19. 

The club will be assisted by the 
well known soloists Mrs. Edith Ging- 
rich and Miss Merle Saylor who will 
take the place of Mrs. MWls, due to 
the latter's illness. 

This is the first year that the girls 
are giving their program way from 
home. All those who heard the home 
concert are assured that the club, 
with its very able leader, Miss Engle, 
will become as well known as our 
Men's Glee Club. 



The Kalozetean Literary Society, 
celebrated its Golden Anniversary on 
April 8th, with one of the finest pro- 
grams ever presented at Lebanon Val- 
ley. Engle Hall was crowded with 
students, friends, and alumni. The 
program was opened with a piano 
solo by Henry Ludwig. A prayer 
was then offered by Rev. I. S. Ernst, 
a Kalo alumnus. David Shroyer then 
rendered a vocal solo to the delight 
of the audience. One of the most in- 
teresting features of the program was 
the Golden Anniversary President's 
Address by Mr. William Garman'77, 
the organizing president of the Soc- 
iety, fifty years ago. He told how 
Kalo originated and of the hardships 
which any newly formed organization 
must contend with and overcome in 
order to be a success. Kalo did over- 
come these hardships and to-day she 
(Continued on Page 3) 



INSTALLATION FJR 
Y.M. ANDY.W. HELD 

Dr. Gossard Installs New Cabi- 
nets in Annual Public 
Ceremony 



The installation ot l.W.C.A. and 
Y.M.C.A. officers held in chapel on 
Monday, April 14th, was impressive 
and gave the students the idea of the 
purpose and benefits that the students 
derive from these associations. 

It is customary to have the officers 
installed by the president of the 
school before the student body and 
to render a short religious program 
suitable to the event. The program 
was exceptionally inspiring and beau- 
tified by the costuming — the girls 
wearing white while the boys wore 
dark suits. The retiring president in 
a short address challenged the new 
members to give their best to the 
carrying out of the duties of the Y. 
W. and Y.M. and, if possible, to ex- 
ceed the goal the old cabinet had 
attained in their successful year. 
The president of the school, Dr. Goss- 
ard, then laid the charges of the 
offices before the new board. Miss 
Snoke, the new president of the Y.W. 
responded and on behalf of the ca- 
binets she accepted the responsibilit- 
ies of the office and promised to do 
her best to raise the standards still 
higher. 

The program was as follows: 

Call to Worship Emma Madciff 

Prayer led by Wade Miller 

(Continued on Page 4) 



GLEE CLUB HOME 
CONCERT MAY DAY 

Special Concert to Crown Suc- 
cessful 1927 
Season 



Culminating the most successful 
season since its inception, the Leb- 
anon Valley College Men's Glee Club 
will present its annual home concert 
in the Engle Conservatory on the 
evening of May Day, May 7, at 8:15 
o'clock. Under the capable direction 
of Prof. George Rogers, a number 
of specialties, denied the audiences 
on the trips, are being- prepared for 
the students and friends in the local 
appearance. 

The 1927 program combines in a 
most pleasing manner many sacred 
and secular numbers, carrying one at 
times from the sublime to the ridi- 
culous and then returning to reality. 
Quartettes, readings, solos and short 
sketches intersperse the club numbers 
in an intersting and attractive 
manner. 

Although the club was hard hit by 
sickness and death as well as by 
grades, it has been strengthened and 
balanced by several new voices. 



Perhaps the publication of 
"Enough Rope", a book of light 
verse by Dorothy Parker, (Boni & 
Liveright) is responsible for the 
slump in student suicides. At any 
rate "The Windmill" found there- 
in a poem called "Resume" that 
should be posted in all conspicuous 
places about the campus: 
Razors pain you; 
Rivers are damp; 
Acids stain you; 

And drugs cause cramp. 
Guns aren't lawful; 

Nooses give; 
Gas smells awful; 

You might as well live. 

—The New Student 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, April 28, 1927 



iHieColkjienne 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiei 

H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 

Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '30 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

Clio MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delphian ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

Philo JOHN W. BEATT1E, '29 

General JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 

WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTER WICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 









EDITORIALS 


—1 



This issue of "LA VIE " marks the beginning - of the 1928 re- 
gime, one and one half years after our paper's humble origin. 
How "The Crucible" died and how the school lacked a newspaper 
for two whole years are both history. We are concerned, now, 
with the story of LA VIE — its humble beginnings, its struggle 
for existance, and its present hopes for success. 

Just before Thanksgiving in 1925, the first edition of LA VIE 
made its appearance. With no traditions on which to build, no 
alumni circulation on which to depend, and with no students 
trained for the work, the first half year presented hard roads to 
travel. Under "Bill" Grill and "Hen" Gingrich, that first stall 
worked earnestly and quietly, laying foundations for the LA V1L 
we have to-day. They made no presumptions concerning their 
efforts, unselfishly laboring for the LA VIE that was to come. 
The next year, with but a half year's work to build on, "Kelly' 
Ness and Wade Miller took up the work, laboring for a better 
paper and sounder finances — and achieving for us the most suc- 
cessful campus news-paper in L. V. history. 

To-day, with every chance for success in the future, it be- 
hooves us, the present staff, in our first edition of this paper, to 
outline, in a maimer, the principles upon which this publication 
will be run and the policies for which it will stand. Our hopes 
for a wider circulation, improved and more vital editorials, 
"newsier" articles, and better feature sections will not need dis- 
cussion here. They will be evident, we hope, to the campus ami 
its friends in the future. 

In the first place, then, we will aim to present in a clear, 
interesting, "newsy" manner, all items of interest to Lebanon 
Valley people, on the campus or elsewhere. That does not mean 
that LA VIE will not be a student paper — of, for, and by the 
students — but merely expresses our belief in the importance 
of broadening our horizon to ALL Lebanon Valley folks, 
EVERYWHERE. 

Secondly, we hope to broaden our editorial functions. The 
columns of this year's LA VIE will strive always to impartially 
reflect and guide student thought. Our guide here will be a 
"Bigger and Better Lebanon Valley". Subjecting all class, so- 
ciety, or individual prejudices to an ever greater cause, we will 
present for your consideration problems and movements vital 
to our campus and frequently to others as well. We expect to be 
frank — and invite you to be the same. All signed letters sent 
to the editor for publication will be used, without disclosing the 
writer's name, if that desire is expressei I Let us hear from you! 

Finally, our third and perhaps greatest function this year 
will be an intense but unprejudiced support of ALL worth-while 
student activities and enterprises. Among our aims will be sup- 
port of all worthy clubs and arganizations now existing; debating 
for all; athletics for all; the upholding of our dramatic tradition: 
wider and better publicity for campus traditions and activ ities: 
and last (and perhaps greatest), lull support of the adminis- 
tration in raising scholastic standards. 

That is what WE expect to do, folks, students, alumni, teaeh- 
ers, friends — what will YOU do? This is YOUR paper; d needs 
YOUR support. We stand for Progress— for a "Bigger and 
Better" Lebanon Valley. Do you? 

REMEMBER — WITHOUT Y( )UR SUP] >( )RT, I ,A VIE 
DOES NOT DESERVE . Y< >UR CRITICISMS ! ! ! 



SUPPORT "LA VIE" ! 



College Calendar 



Thursday April 28 

6:10 P.M.— Ministerium. 

7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 

8:00 P.M.— College Band practice. 

Friday, April 29 
7:00 P.M. — Regular sessions of 
Literary Societies. 

Saturday, April 30 
3:00 P.M.— Schuylkill vs. L. V. at 
home. 

Sunday, May 1 
5:45 P.M.— Y. W. Devotional Ser- 
vice. 

Monday, May 2 

4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer, 
7:00 P.M.— Reader's Club. 
9:00 P.M. — Men's Senate. 

Tuesday, May 3 
4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 
6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer Meeting 

Wednesday, May 4 
4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board. 

Thursday, May 5 
6:00 P.M. — Ministerium. 
7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 
8:00 P.M.— College Band Practice. 

Friday, May 6 
8:00 P.M.— 60th Anniversary Philo 
Literary Society. 

Saturday, May 7 
2:00 P.M.— May Day. 
4:00. P.M.— Base Ball. Western 
Maryland vs. L. V., at home. 

8:00 P.M.— Men's Glee Club Con- 
cert. 

Sunday, May 8 
5:45 P.M.— Y. W. Devotional Ser- 
vice. 

Monday, May 9 
4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M.— Writers' Club. 
9:00 P.M.— Men's Senate. 

Tuesday, May 10 
4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 
6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer. Meet- 
ing 

Wednesday, May 11 
4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board. 

Alumni Notes 

Mr. Charles Kleinfelter, '20, ath- 
letic coach of Trenton High School 
was a visitor on the campus and gave 
a short "pep talk" In chapel on Thurs- 
day morning, April 21. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Herbert Beattio 
announce the birth of a son, Willinn 
Herbert Jr., born on April 14. Mr 
Beattie. a graduate of the class of '24 
is the principal of the High School at 
Hyndman, Pa. 

Rev. George Hallman, '17, of Hum- 
melstown, Rev. P. B. Gibble, '15, of 
Palmyra, Rev. C. R. Longenecker 
'17 of Cleona, Rev. H. E. Miller, '99 
of Lebanon, Mr, George Williams, '13 
a teacher in the Jefferson Medic n I 
School of Philadelphia, Mr. Reuben 
Williams, '17 a dentist in Philadephia, 
Mr. Charles E. Roudabush, 03 Supt 
of Schools of Minersville, Homer 
Wieder, '26, Henry Williard, '26. 
David Shroyer, '26, Charles Ortiz, '26 
and Henry Gingrich, '26 all alumni 
of L. V. C. and of the Kalozetean 
Literary Society were in Annville to 
attend the Kalo banquet on Saturday 
evening, April 9. 



KALO GOLDEN ANNIVER- 
SARY FITTING CLTMAX TO 
FIFTY YEARS' ACTIVITY 



(Continued from Page 1) 
is one of the foremost societies on 
the campus. The president's Ad- 
dress was then given by William 
Hemperly. 

After this part of the program 
came the splendid production of the 
play, "A Bill of Divorcement" under 
the direction of Mary K. Wallace of 
the English Department. The play 
kept the audience on edge from the 
beginning to the end. Miss Kind! 
and Mr. Aungst gave exceptional per • 




"O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



—BURNS 



Oh Beby! What circus did you escape from? C'mon boy, 
strike him out! Just look at those cute blue and yellow stockings 

There goes Beatty's Ford! The Bullentin is getting- a red 

hot line on this game. Tomorrow we'll find the write up in 
some corner of the paper — Who ate all them peanuts? Them's 
mine! — Wow! see that one! This is Boob's heavy day. Let's 
give him a clap when he comes in — O poor thing! Did the 
naughty ball hit you in the side? C'mon Smitty, give us an- 
other homer — And that's the way to play base-ball from the 
sideline. 



Never say die, do it — and save the world from at least one 
crank. 



From the cradle to the grave women and men must differ. 
Take for example the college age. When the fellows start to 
raise moustaches, the girls get their hair bobbed again, 



Everyone feels that Hooks isn't long for this world, 
smiled during the Juniata game. 



Be 



This is the grass on the campus. This is the horse that walks 
on the grass on the campus. 

This is the mower that follows the horse who walks on the 
grass on the campus. 

This is the professor who is angry at the mower which 
follows the horse who walks on the grass that grows on the 
campus. 



Once :qpon a time there was a nice little collitch which 
was a good collitch and sent all its boys and girls home at 
Eastertime — for their spring vacation — to help their mammas 
to clean house and to catch up on their studies. But how glad 
the little boys and girls were to get back to the campus again, 
to eat the wholesome .food and see the collitch bugs flying 
around the light at night. For the little boys and girls had 
gone to bed so early all through their vacation, and they were 
very tired, so the kind professors, who were young once them- 
selves, let them sleep in class. And the little boys and girls 
studied very hard — how to get a few more sheckles from dad 
after the Easter touch, or how to break those dumb dates made 
in the Easter rush. Yes children, if you'll do what these good 
collitch boys and girls do maybe you'll Hunk sonic day and go to 
heaven too. 



We wish to thank the former martyr to this column for 
her kind expressions of sympathy in the previous issue. We are 
sure we will need X amount of it to the nth degree, 

"Quixotic is his enterprise, and hopeless his adventure is 
Who seeks for jocularities that haven't yet been made. 

This old world has been joking for over fifteen centuries, 
And all the really funny things have long ago been said." 

W. S. Gilbert, "The wornout Humorist". 
Sincerely yours, 

The Campus Worm 



formances, although the whole play 
was very well "cast". 

The entire cast of characters is as 
follows: 

Cast of Characters 
Margaret Fairfield Alice Kindt- 
Miss Hester Fairfield__Esther Walmer 
Sidney Fairfield Janet Millet- 
Basset Norman Vanderwall 

Gray Meredith Raymond Koch 

Kit Pumphrey Joseph Bruno 

Hilary Fairfield Henry Aungst 

Dr. Alliot J. Gordan Starr 

The Rev. Christopher Pumphrey 

— James Hazelton 

The Society wishes to express their 
sincerest appreciation of the untiring 
efforts of Miss Wallace in the making 
of this play a decided success. 

After the program in Engle Hall, 
the audience was invited to the 
Alumni gymnasium where a social 
hour was enjoyed. The decorations 
in the gym were unsurpassable. It 



was arrayed in all the colors of spring 
with a large illuminated bell of dif- 
ferent colors. An orchestra led by 
"Hen" Ludwig furnished first class 
music for the occasion. Refresh- 
ments were :hen served — the "end of 
a perfect day", and with the excep- 
tion of a few hardships, the end of 
fifty Golden Years for Kalo with our 
motto ever in view: "Palma Non 
Sine Pulvere". 

Kalo expresses its heartiest appre- 
ciation of the courtesy shown '.y Mr. 
M. B. Krum in furnishing the stage 
property and also the aid of severat 
Professors and friends. 

A surprise was given to all when 
the illuminated Kalo emblem appear- 
ed above the stage. This is the first 
time that any society on the campus 
displayed an enlarged reproduction 
of their emblem. Much credit must 
be given to the efforts of Walter l>. 
Ness, '27 and his helpers. 



+ " 

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4 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, April 28, 1927 



PAGE THREE 



•t + 



IN COLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 

prisoners at the New Haven County 
jail have demanded that compulsory 
chapel attendance be abolished, basin 
their appeal in the same languag 
that the undergraduates of a promi 
n ent University used in petitionin 
the faculty to abandon compulsory 
chapel attendance there. (^u'est 
c e que c'est? 



The girls' riflle team of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland defeated Syracuse 
500 to 496. Six possibles were made 
against Keene Normal and 499 against 
Georgia. The girls have dropped only 
one lone point in four matches. An 
idea for Lebanon Valley? 



"Fraternity ideals and principles 
are vital for the welfare of our land 
and the life of. the world today be 
cause of the great change in college 
life during recent years and the re 
suiting confusion to the college stu 
dent." Thus spoke Dr. Joseph C 
Nate, national Historian of Sigma 
Chi. at an inter-fraternity conference 
held at the University of Illinois early 
in March. There were more than 
3,000 men present at the gathering 
the first of its kind ever held in the 
United States. 

■Dr. Nate contended "The Modern 
problem of Greek letter work is that 
the ideals should not be lost in the 
midst of the many things among 
which chapter life must fight for its 
share of recognition and attention 
— The Bucknellian 



A Junior at the University of Geo- 
rgia carried an alarm clock to class 
so that he might be awakened from 
his sweet dreams in plenty of time 
to get to his next class. But evident- 
ly on a sudden inspiration, the time- 
piece began to alarm a few minutes 
before the period was ended and 
awoke the entire class before it could 
be recovered form the depths of his 
pocket. The professor kindly offered 
to awaken the class the rest of the 
year. 



The Pennsylvania Supreme Couri 
decided that the recent .merger of the 
United Evangelical Church and the 
Evangelical Association was legal 
The decision reverses the Lebanon 
County Court which had decided the 
merger invalid as affecting the East 
Penna. Conference. The case before 
the court involved the control of Al 
bright College at Myerstown, and 
was a vital one to the college. After 
the consideration the mergerites 
named six trustees to the Board. 
Court action taken by the anti-mer- 
Serites resulted in their being ousted 
by a decision by Judge Henry of the 
Lebanon County Court. The entire 
denomination is now under the same 
status as before the controversy 
Which split the denomination 30 years 
ago. 



A certain Southern College recently 
°Pened its baseball season by losing 
to an old rival with a score of 52 to 
The next morning the President 
°f the college said in a consoling 
^ a y, "Boys, I'm proud of you. In 
^sterday's game you never disputed 
dicision of the Umpire in a sin- 
^ e close play." We, who profess to 
baseball, wonder how there 
c °uld have been a close play at any 
sin Rle time. 



"C" — "What do you mean, — a triple 
Vat prof?" 

E"" — "Doesn't he taech Latin, 
Gr eek, and Spanish?" 



You say he broke up the bridal?" 
j Yes. The horse was dead, the 
a ther was rotten, and he had no 
Ur ther use for it." 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



KALOS HOLD POST AN- 
NIVERSARY MEETING 



CLIONIANS PRESENT 

SPECIAL PROGRAM 



Hiasing up alter tne strenuous uc 
tivuy suirounuing meir Uoiuen An 
niveisary, ine i^aios guve a snort uu 
interesting program i-riuay evening 
April 22. i\oy rlooK, vice-pi esiuen 
piesiueu. Tne program loiiows; 
Wnats Wrong witn onina.' win. .oiai 

il may be so Ziecnmei 

quartette Harmony iiuwiei 

uermati lieauing ronest ivmie 

wnat s New'/ J^eily iNe&ii 

A business session loiioweu tne la 
erary program, ine meetings wer 
very well attended. 



L. V. DROPS OPENER 

JtSUT W11NS 1NUXT TWO 



(Continued trom page 1) 
Beading, April 20. 

in a game nlled witn hard hitting 
Lebanon Valley swamped bcnuyiKii 
2.2-11. Scoring 18 runs in lour inn 
ings, tbe Ai'.nville Collegians easeu 
up and Schuylkill rompea across Uit, 
plate 7 times in tbe lourtn Zappiu 
cigntened up, allowing only two runs 
the remainder of the game. iJuncn 
ing hve hits in the ninth, one of them 
a home run by Wentz, .Lebanon Vai 
ley scored four more markers. The 
hard slugging of the Lebanon Valie^ 
club was the outstanding feature oi 
the game. 



Annville, April 21. 

Pitching a great game, Piela shut- 
out Juniata, allowing them only two 
hits. The first five innings Juniata 
was hitless, getting one in the sixth 
and one in the ninth. Lebanon Val 
ley scored in the first when Hendricks 
tripled, Albright doubled, stole third 
and scored on Gilbert's sacrifice 
Two scored in the second on hits by 
Piela and Piersol, Metoxen's sacrifice, 
and Hendricks' single. The third was 
like the first two innings, two runs 
being scored on hits by Mayer, Piela 
and Piersol. This ended Lebanon 
Valley's scoring until the seventh, 
when Hendricks doubled, stole third 
and scored on Wentz's sacrifice. The 
hitting of Hendricks and Piersol with 
Piela's fine hurling stood out for 
L. V. C. 



The scores: 
LEBANON 



VALLEY COLLEGE 
AB R H O A E 



Moyer,2b 5 1111 

Albright cf 5 12 2 

Gelbert ss 4 2 3 2 1 

Wentz, lf-3b 3 2 111 

Bendigo, c 5 1 1 10 

Zappia, rf 4 1 1 1 

Piersol, lb 4 12 8 1 

Smith, 3b 3 2 

Hagar, p 1 2 

Totals 39 11 13 24 12 

GETTYSBURG COLLEGE 





AB 


R 


11 


O 


A 





Baugher, lb 


5 








12 





1 


Wills, cf _ __. 


5 


3 


3 











Bream, ss _ __ 


4 


2 


1 


3 


5 





Shull, rf _ 


5 


4 


4 











Rader, c 


5 


1 


2 


3 





t> 


Donat, If 


4 


1 


1 


2 








Stumpff, 2b 


__ 3 


1 


2 





6 





Challenger, 3b __ 


__ 4 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


Jones, p 


3 


1 





1 





a 



Totals 37 14 15 27 12 2 

V. C. 3 4 1 3 0—11 

Gettysburg 00 4251 2 0—1-1 

Two-base Hits— Moyer, Zaffia, Al- 
right. Three-Base Hits— Piela, Gil- 
bert. Double Play— Moyer to Piersol. 
Struck Out— by Piela, 6; Hagar, 3; 
Jones, 8. Home Runs— Gelbert, Wells 
Shull. 



The members of Clio were surprised 
last Friday .light to find how many 
professional members they had in 
their midst. A pleasing program was 
rendered which was both entertain- 
ing and educational. 

It was as follow: 

Music Mildred Meyers 

Sports Madeline Mark 

Serenading Grace Daniel, Bebe 

Burrier. 

Poetry _,_ Emma Shaeffer 

Dancing Florence Millei 

Golddigging Pauline Shaeffer 



DELPHIANS LEARN 

ALL ABOUT BUYING 



The regular literary session of Del- 
phian was held on Friday evening, 
April 22, at six o'clock. Tis true that 
"in spring a young girl's fancy turns 
to thoughts of pretty dresses." Del- 
phian girls were told how to buy the 
most for the least amount of money, 
through the following programme. 

Ads. Sara Lou Rose 

This Week's Specials 

Music Ruth Strubhar 

Literature Mildred Umholtz 

Victor Records Bernita Strebig 



TWO GOOD PROGRAMS 

PUT ON Ai ±*HlLO 

The barnyard animals made their 
appearance on the stage in i'hiio Hall 
on Friday evening, April 8 when the 
Farm Show was presented oy the 
members of the society. When the 
show began, Oscar Sneath led the 
procession with the "Horses" and he 
was followed rather closely by Carl 
Sloat with his "Cows". Fegiey show- 
up following with his "Sheep" with 
all the tenacity of a good shepherd 
lad while "Judge" Marshall was in 
his element among the "Poultry", 
bprecher concluded the program with 
his "Living Thoughts". 

Returning from their vacation full 
of vim, vigor and vitality, Phiios 
gave an extemporaneous program on 
r noay evening, April 22, as lollows: 
Ye Olde Thyme Songs, Audience; 
Can a Rabbit Beat a Turtle to a 
Given Goal?, Keene; The Importance 
of the Moon in Love-Making, Zwaliy; 
Love at First Sight, Horst; Is the 
Lumberyard an Asset or Liability to 
L. V. C, Kohler; Debate: Resolved: 
That it should be a misdemeanor in 
the state of Pennsylvania to hug.kiss, 
pet or otherwise, any girl who is not 
yet your close kin or your wife. At 
fermative: Nitrauer, Negative: Fugh; 
riow 1 Spent my Vacation, Snyder; 
My First Date at L. V. C, Sneath 
The Philokosmian Literary Society 



Special reductions (on orders ovei 
$10 or 100 pounds). —Blanche Cochran "takes this opportunity to congratulate 

the Kalozetean Literary Society upon 
the successful celebration 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 





AB 


R 


H 


O 


A 


Hendricks, rf . 


___ 5 


5 


3 








Albright, cf 


4 


3 


4 


1 





Wentz, 2b 


6 


4 


3 


5 


1 


Gelbert, ss _ 


r 


2 


3 


2 


8 


Bendigo, c 


4 


1 





4 





Piela, If 


e 


2 


3 


2 





Piersol, lb 


7 





3 


8 





Zappia, p 


4 


2 


1 


1 


1 


Smith, 3b 


6 


3 


1 


3 


2 


Metoxen, c 


— 1 





1 


1 






Totals i8 22 22 27 12 

SCHUYLKILL COLLEGE 

AB R H O A 

Clemens, ss 6 3 2 3 3 

Grant, cf 5 2 2 3 

White, 2b 5 2 2 3 3 

Radcliff, If 4 1 4 3 

McDonald, If 5 1 11 

Boyle, rf 5 

Roth, 3b 4 10 1 

Kopp, c 5 12 3 4 

B. Kopp, p 10 11 

Albright, p 4 110 1 



Totals 39 11 14 27 13 3 

L. V. C. 2 4 6 6 4—22 

Schuylkill 2 007020 00 —11 

Two-Base Hits— Wentz, Albright, 
McDonald. Three-Base Hits— Gelbert 
White, J. Kopp, Radcliff. Double 
Play — Gelbert- Wentz-Piersol, Clemens 
White-McDonald.Struck Out— by 
Zappia, 5; by Kopp, 2. First Base on 
Called Balls— off Zappia, 3; off Kopp, 
off Albright 1. Hit by Pitcher- 
Albright. Home Runs — Wentz. 
Umpire — Beckley. 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

AB R H O A E 

Hendricks, rf 4 2 3 3 

Albright, cf 4112 0.0 

Wentz, If 4 

Gelbert. ss 3 P 

Moyer, 2b 3 110 2 

Piela, p 4 2 2 1 7 

Piersol, lb 4 13 9 11 

Metoxen, c 2 9 1 

Smith, 3b 3 2 1 1 

Bendigo, c 10 10 



Golden Anniversary. 



of their 



JUNIATA 
AB R 

Weller, ss 4 

Miller, c 4 

McClain, If 4 

Weimer, 3b 4. 

Brumbaugh, p 3 

West, cf 3 

Conner, lh 2 

Beery, rf 2 

Snyder, 2b 3 

Mansberger, rf 2 



15 

1. 



1 



Totals 31 2 24 14 1 

Juniata 0—0 

L. V. C 2 2 2 1 0—7 

Two-Base Hits— Albright, Hendricks 
Three-Base Hits— Hendricks, Piela, 
Weimer. Struck Out— by Piela, 7 
by Brumbaugh, 3. First Base on Call- 
ed Balls— off Piela, 3; off Brumbaugh 
0. Hit by Pitcher— Brumbaugh. 

Umpire— Gallagher. 



Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Studio and Home Portraits 
Films Printed and Developed 
Promptly 



[ CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway . 

Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours, 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _ _ ..Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



We Recommend 

Shaeffer Lifetime 
Fountain Pens 

Absolutely the Best Pen 
Made, and Guaranteed 
to Last a Lifetime 

HARPEL'S 

757-759 Cumberland St. 
THE GIFT STORE OF LEBANON 



Totals 32 7 10 27 12 12 



When we consider how many think 
they'll flunk out, and then how many 
actually do flunk out, we don't be- 
lieve in Luck, N 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 

THE HUB 

713 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA. 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF QUALITY 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

36 North Eighth Street, LEBANON, PA. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, AI'K'lL 18; t<)2 7 



Kampus Kracks j 

. „ -. „ ... ■ „ ', ..... ■ „ ...,,...,,...■, 

I UPPER CLASSMAN: (After Kalo. 
Anniversary) "I thought you sail 
you were playing a leading part id 
the play." 

MENTZER: "Well, wasn't I a 
Usher?" 



SWORN BY THE GODS 
•; LEWARS: "The girls didn't hott- 
er me this vacation, I studied hard; 
and never stayed out late." 



: EGGIE: (two fair ones at his side 
a.nd being piched for careless driving) 
"But officer, I'm a student." 

I STATE COP: "Ignorance is no ex- 
cuse, I'll send you an Easter greeting 
written so even you can understand 

it." ! 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB J 927 



Give Ear, 

Freshmen, 
Whilst 

1 reveal 
The reason 
Why 

A Locomotive 
Couldst not 
Endure the 
Spring Round Up 
It is because, 
Innocents 
The locomotive 
Hath a 

Tender behind. 



INSTALLATION FOR 

Y.M. AND Y.W. HELD 



jj JOHN BRUCE: "Do you' take 
Home Economics?" 

Y. M. C. A.: "No, I take * home 
Nelda." 

j 

FESH FROSH: "Well, what kind 
of a time did you have at Washing 
ton?". 

\ SHIGEYUKI: "Oh, we had day 
light saving time." 

ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT 

1 i 
P "And thou, oh Vinegar, shalt be 

|;ood unto they mother even as glass 

pottles are unto their Pop." 

r"— « - . 

. PROF. WALLACE "What would 
you say constitutes a poet?" 
; ZECHMAN: " Well, a poet is 
feller vot writes werse, and werse 
&nd werse" 



" SWEET ONE FROM WEST HALL 
"Why does a violin have to have a 
fridge?" 

j ALCESTA: "That's what gets my 
music across." 



\ PROF. BUTTERWICK: (In Hist 
16) "Mr. Candanp., what is the great 
^st mausoleum in existance today? 
\ BANANO: (with conviction) u The 
men's dorm, during Easter vacation.' 



\ MIKE: (On Tuesday evening of 
vacation) "Yea, I have. Economics 
tomorrow, and I came back tonight 
because I've got a heck of a lot of 
work to do. (Pause of 10.5 seconds) 
Say, Eggie, d'ya know where I can 
get a good date tonight?" ; 



KALO ANNIVERSARY 

BANQUET A SUCCESS 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Toastmaster Dr. A. S. Lehman 

Prayer Dr.. G. D. tiossard 

Toast Dr. Rev. H. E. Mille 

Songs , —J. Kalo Quartette 

Toast Prof. C. E. Roudabus 

Solo Robert Knol 

Toast Rev. Geo. Hallman 

Miscellaneuos Toasts 

Alma Mater 
Everyone present expressed his de 
sire of having a like affair every 
year, so that the Anniversary Ban 
quet will probably become a trad 
tion. The banquet was enjoyed b 
old and new Kalos alike. The road 
is clear for a bigger more succesful 
Kalo in the fifty years to come. 




Rear Row L to R — Kiehneir, Mentzer, Keene, Walters. Middle Row— Beattie, Jennings, Carpenter, 
Hertzler, Pugh, Hafer, Miller, Jacks, Fornwalt, Rojahn, Ebersole. Front Row— Horst (Pianist), Behney 
(Vice Pres.), Bollinger (Bus. Mgr.), Prof. Rogers (Director), Hershey; (Pres.) Albright (Treas.), Hoff- 
man. '> ! 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Scripeure Reading — Emma Madciu 

Scripture Reading —Wade Vlillei 

Challenge of Retiring Y.W. president 

Challenge to' New Officers, '.— 

__• Dr. Gossard 

Response__Eleanor Snoke, New Y.W. 
president. 

Prayer__J. Bruce Behney, New Y.M. 
president. 

The new officers have had a great 
honor conferred upon them as well 
as having to assume a great respon- 
sibility, for the two organizations 
have a large part in the development 
of all phases of life on the campus 
of L. V. C. But through the cooper- 
ation and honest effort on the part oi 
each member of the cabinets as well 
as the entire school the year can be 
nothing but a successful one. 



PHILO WILL CELEBRATE 
SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 
ON EVE OF MAY DAY 



(Continued from page 1) 
their efforts toward the betterment 
of Philo have not been in vain; that 
the ideals of the society are.beint; 
maintained and that the motto is 
being upheld. 

Following the usual custom, a 
reception will be held in the Alumni 
gymnasium immediately after the 
program in the Conservatory. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



ANNUAL RECITAL 

DATES ANNOUNCED 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Thursday, May 20. 

Grace Daniel, Organ; Leah 
Harpel, Voice; Violet Krone, Organ. 
Thursday, May 27. 

Mildred Myers, Piano; Leah 
Miller, Voice; Mable Yingst, Organ. 
Tuesday, May 18. 

Christine Evans, Organ; Bernita 
Strebig, Organ; Hilda Hess, Piano; 
Olive Weigel, Piano; Pearl Linde- 
muth, Voice. 
Tuesday, May 25. 

Mary Grubb, Piano; Mary Hart^, 
Piano; Hilda Hess, Organ; Mary 
Overly, Voice; Winf red Peck, Voice. 
Tuesday, May 31. 

Violet Ferree, Piano; Violet 
Krone, Organ; David Shroyer, Voice. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Fine 

Home-Made 
Candies 

LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 

A fine place to treat your 
friend 

TSCHUDY'S 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. O. Bldg. 
West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



, frcm your old 
shoes -We repair 
them lots of wear 

ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR 
COMPANY 


THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 


DR. HARRIS G^^A^^ 
Eyesight Specialist — Optometrist 

GLASSES REPAIRED 
10 N. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 






E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON, PENNA. 











Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

Annville _ Pa. 
Bowling and Billiards 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 

UNION EMBLEM CO PALMYRA, PA. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 

HARRY W. LIGHT 

43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE, PA- 



VOL 



Lar? 



The 
opent 
on tl 
Frida 
gram 
Philo 
tion ( 
gressi 
in the 
with 
of th 
16, o 
S. M 
Addn 
inspii 
"Esse 
than 
gave 
Cum 
the a 
bell, 
Jacob 
part 
select 

The 
was d 
play, 
Robei 
direcl 
The j 



192 



Staff 



The 
ties" 
week 
nioria 
and ( 
comp] 
Printt 
Work, 
futur< 

Wh 
does 
of th 
book 
distin 
ferenl 



A 

day 
sent 
<%h 
this 
Inco 
are 
enai 
Play 
8ra\ 
Tl 
ed l 

tack 
gley 
field 
Elbe 
Wh, 
and 



4 



BEAT 



MT. ST. MARY'S 



la$ie Colkijiennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SUPPORT THE 
STUDENT RECITALS 



VOLUME II 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1927 



NUMBER 13 



PWLOS END SIXTY YEARS' ACTIVITY 

WITH FRIDAY EVENING'S PROGRAM 

Large Crowd of Alumni and Friends See Well Balanced Program 
—Dr. Wallace Directs Play— Reception 
In Gym Follows 



The Philokosmian Literary Society 
opened its sixty-first year of activity 
on the Lebanon Valley campus on 
Friday evening, May 6 with a pro- 
gram which far excelled previous 
Philo entertainments. The celebra- 
tion of the close of sixty years' pro- 
gressive work began at 8:15 o'clock 
in the Engle Hall which was crowded 
with the many members and freinds 
of the society. Dr. C. H. Holzinger, 
'16, offered the opening prayer. Wade 
S. Miller, '27, gave the President's 
Address, using as the basis of a most 
inspiring talk the motto of the society 
"Esse quam videri" — "to be rather 
than to seem". Jesse 0. Ziegler, '19, 
gave a vocal solo, "Nocturne" by 
Curran, which was well received by 
the audience. Prof. R. Porter Camp- 
bell, '16, accompanied Mr. Ziegler. 
Jacob M. Horst, 28, closed the first 
part of the program with an organ 
selection, "Dithyramb" by Lucas. 

The second part of the program 
was devoted to the production of the 
play, "David Garrick" by T. W. 
Robertson. Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace 
directed this part of the program. 
The play was one of the period near 
(Continued on Page 2) 



GLEE CLUB HOLDS 
MAY DAY CONCERT 

Annual Home Concert Pleases 
Large Crowd In 
Engle Hall 

The Lebanon Valley College Men's 
Glee Club brought to a close the 
festivities of May Day with their 
annual home concert on Saturday, 
May 7. The entertainment was given 
in the Engle Conservatory before a 
crowd which outnumbered any of 
those previously met. The program 
with its many specialties was en- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



1928 QUiTTIES 

OUTNEXT WEEK 

Staff Promises Exceptional Book 
—Several Extra Copies 
To Be Had 



The Nineteen Twenty-eight "Quit- 
ties" are scheduled to arrive next 
Week and will be on sale gefore Me- 
morial Day. The final proof reading 
an d other last minute touches were 
completed several weeks ago and the 
Printers are going ahead with the 
*ork, promising the book in the near 
future. 

While the staff, for obvious reasons, 
^°es not care to disclose the details 
°f this year's volume, it promises a 
book filled with photographs that are 
distinctive, and art work that is "dif- 
ferent" and well handled. The beau- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



GIRLS GIVE 
MOR 



WO 

: CONCERTS 



Program Given Successfully 
Both At Lebanon And 
At Palmyra 



The Eurydice Choral Club of Leb- 
anon Valley College under the direc- 
tion of Miss Ruth Engle gave two 
successful concerts one at Lebanon 
Tuesday, April 26 and the other at 
Palmyra Friday, April 29. Although 
the Spanish scene had to be dispensed 
with at the concert in the Seventh 
Stree Lutheran Church, Lebanon the 
program was thoroughly enjoyed by 
all present. 

The club had a large and appreci- 
(Continued on Page 2) 



LV. SINKS W. MD, 
AND SCHUYLKILL 



Timely Hitting Feature 
Both Games 



NINETEEN TWENTY SEVEN MAY DAY 

PAGEANT GIVEN BEFORE COLORFUL CROWD 



Piersol's Hard and Metoxen's May Day 1660, In Hereford, England, Reproduced— Miss Dundore 



Before a colorful May Day crowd 
Lebanon Valley took Western Mary 
land into camp 5-3. Piela pitched 
magnificent ball, and except for the 
fourth inning, when an error and two 
hits gave Western Maryland two runs 
he was unbeatable. The boys from 
Maryland lead L. V. until the seventh 
when the locals pushed a run across 
to tie the score. Metoxfen duplicated 
his feat of last week by knocking in 
the tying run with a slashing double 
to left. In the eighth L. V. scored 
two runs on hits by Wentz and Gel- 
bert and Western Maryland's error 
on Piersols bounder, enough to win 
the game. Piela struck out two men 
in the ninth, bringing his day's total 
to twelve. Piersol continued his hard 
hitting getting two singles in four 
trips to the plate. 



This victory matched one of the 
Saturday before, when, in a beauti- 
fully played game, the exact opposite 
of the 22-11 victory at Beading, Leb- 
anon Valley defeated Schuylkill Col- 



SECOND SENIOR 

TEH SUCCESS 

Men Again Succumb to Wiles of 
Female Classmates — Affair 
Is Well Attended 



At the chapel exercises last Fri- 
day morning, Dr. Butterwick pre- 
Se nted gold foot-balls to this year's 
e ighteen letter men. The balls 
this year, furnished by Auld's. 
^corporated, of Columbus, Ohio, 
ar e of beaten gold, with raised 
Cameled "L's". The name of the 
Stayer and his position are en- 
^ ra ved on each ball. 
The following men were award- 
balls this year: — Captain Fox 
ta< *le; Captain-elect Gelbert, Sin- 
^ e y» Nitrauer, Starr, Zappia, back- 
ed men; Cunjack, Bendigo, Piebi 
rj b erti, Wood, Piersol, Wilson, 
^heeler, Heath, Metoxen, linemen; 
n d Mouer, Manager. 



Two weeks ago today, North Hall 
parlor was indeed a "homey" scene, 
as the senior girls dropped cushions 
here and there in preparation to en- 
tertain the senior boys at tea. Al- 
though he weather was inclement, the 
spirits of those present were not 
dampened in the least. 

Pearl Lindenmuth delightfully en- 
tertained with a vocal solo, "At 
Morning". A rather wierd sketch en- 
titled "The Witch of Vesuvius" taken 
from "The Last Days of Pompeii" 
was presented by Gladys Buffington, 
Miriam Dougherty and Sara Blecker. 

Dainty refreshments were served by 
the girls, and, after persuasion, "Hen" 
Ludwig rendered further musical en- 
tertainment. 

This is the second time that the 
senior girls have attempted to ac- 
quaint their bashful class mates with 
some of the formalities of Society. 
The girls report that the boys are 
learning rapidly,-even "Zorky" Fox's 
foot-ball manners are becoming more 
civilized. 



HISTORY CLASS ON 
TRIP TO GETTYSBURG 

Prof. Shenk Vividly Portrayes 
Battle of G'burg 
to Seniors 



Makes Pretty Queen— Costumes and Dances 
Are Most Attractive In Years 



CROWD SAID TO BE LARGEST IN YEARS 



SPEAKERS NAMED 
FOR GRADUATION 

Baccalaureate and Commence 
ment Speakers Are 
Announced 



Lebanon Valley College has been 
very fortunate in securing Hon. J. 
Warren Davis of Trenton, N. J. as 
the speaker for commencement day, 
June 15, 1927, and the Rev. Charles 
Allen Fisher of Worchester, Mass. 
to deliver the baccalaureate sermon 
on Sunday, June 12. Both men are 
able speakers and come very highly 
recommended. Mr. Davis is one of 
(Continued on Page 4) 



On Friday, April 29th, Prof. Shenk 
took his class in History 46 for an all- 
day trip to Gettysburg, where they 
visited the battlefields. Prof^ Wallace 
also accompanied the group. Prof. 
Shenk pointed out all the points of 
interest and explained in an interest- 
ing manner the history of the spot. 
They also visited the graves of many 
outstanding patriots not only at Get- 
tysburg but on the rturn trip by way 
of Chambersburg, Carlyle and Harris- 
burg. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



OFFICERS SELECTED 
BY READER'S CLUB 

Elmer Reiser Elected President 
and Mary Clymer 
Vice-President 



On Monday evening, May 2nd the 
bi-weekly meeting of the Reader's 
Club was held in North Hall parlor 
for the purpose of nominating and 
electing officers. The following were 
elected: 

Preident, Elmer Keiser; Vice Presi- 
dent, Mary Clymer; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Mrs. Hammond; Chairman 
of Program Committee, Ruth Strub- 
har. Bernetha Strickler, the retiring 
president wished the incoming offi- 
cers success in their work and ex- 
pressed her hope that they will have 
a successful year. The evening was 
(Continued on Page 3) 



FIRST STUDENTS' 
RECITAL TO-NIGHT 

Miss Daniel, Miss Burrier, and 
Miss Wolf To Appeaer In 
Engle Hall To-Night 

The first of annual spring recitals 
will be given to-night at 8:00 o'clock 
in Engle Hall by Grace Daniel, piano; 
Benetta Burrier, Voice; Viola Wolf, 
organ. 

Miss Daniel is well known, as she 
has played at many recitals and has 
also been the accompanist for the 
Eurydice Choral Club. Miss Burrier 
has pleased many audiences wih her 
songs, especially as one of the soloists 
(Continued on Page 3) 



L.V. CONQUERS G-BURG 
IN TENNIS OPENER 

Team Shows Up Well In First 
Match, Winning By 
Large Score 

With our first tennis victory tucked 
safely in our belts, things have bright- 
ened up. The tennis prospects for 
this season's play looked decidedly 
poor with the loss of Dave Shroyer 
and Oritz from last year's team. The 
incoming freshman class possessed 
some likely looking prospects, but 
they have never competed under com- 
petetive match play and were there- 
fore of an unknown calibre. The one 
sided 6-0 victory over Gettysburg's 
farily strong team, has given things 
a new light # We have a fine team 
representing the school on the courts, 
and should have for a few seasons, in 
Light of the fact that three of the 
men, Shroyer, brother of Dave of last 
year's team, Fink, and Hertzler are 
freshmen. Herr, a senior and Eberly 
a sophomore, were members of last 
year's team. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



On Sataurday afternoon, May 7th, 
students, alumni and friends, wtiness- 
ed one of the most beautiful demon- 
strations in the history of Lebanon 
Valley— that of the 1927 May Day. 
Old Sol shone down in all his glory 
on the Queen of May and all the lads 
and lassies who came to pay homage 
to her, as he, too, gave evidence if 
his approval of this gay event. 

This gala affair was a reprduction 
of a May Day of 1660 in Hereford, 
England. After the Cromwellian 
rule ended, there was a return of the 
royalty to the throne of England. 
Many changes were made in the 
manners and customs. The people, 
naturally happy because of the re- 
turn of the royalty, demonstrated 
this fact by the erection of May Poles 
around which they danced with glee. 
As the merrymaking of the folk was 
in preparation, Nell Gwyn, a fav- 
orite of Charles II, came back to 
Hereford. The peasant folk had 
much respect and love for her and 
(Continued on Page 4) 



FIRST FACULTY 

RECITAL HELD 

Prof. Harold Malsh, Assisted By 
Harold Jauss, Opens Series 
Of Special Recitals 



The first of a series of special Con- 
servatory recitals was a two violin 
recital given by Harold Malsh and 
Harold Jauss in Engle Hall, Monday 
evening, May 9 at 8:15 o'clock. 

Mr. Malsh a member of the conser- 
vatory faculty, has frequently appear- 
ed in Annville both as soloist and 
member of the Harrisburg string 
quartet. He is not only a brilliant 
violinist but has been recognized as 
one of the best teachers in this sec- 
tion of the state. 

Mr. Jauss began his violin study 
with Mr. Malsh and continued study- 
ing with him until he was accepted 
by Leopold Auer, the world's great- 
est violin teacher. To have a pupil 
(Continued on Page 3) 



The Boy's Dorm became an 
"Open Book" last Thursday after- 
noon when the Men's Senate de- 
clared it open for inspection. The 
night before the halls had an un- 
usual bath, so every thing was 
spotless — almost. Some of the 
boys could , not appreciate the ac- 
tion of the Senate; but if they 
would have stopped to think that 
college training should prepare 
for every possible service they 
would have immediately seen the 
advantage of knowing how to clean 
a room, because men can never 
tell what misfortune may befall 
them, —can they? 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1927 



laiieColkjienne 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiei 

H. DARKES ALBRUGHT, '28 

Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, 2b 

Conservatory 1V1AK 1 L. tiAttlA 

Athletics Ci. (JLlr'FOKD bllNUmii i , ^ 

clio MAK1 E. McCUrvUl, 

Delphian""™""-" AlNJN A B. ArUAit, 5u 

Kalo _ MILES S. rUEHiM&JX, 'jft 

Philo _ JOrliN W. LEA'iTiE, Z\) 

General JAMES C. HAZ.iiaVI'UiN, 

RUTH A. bTUtfriAK, "ito 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 

WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORbT, '2b 

Associate Business Manager L. ArvUnih; nuTZ,, 2y 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BEN NET i 

ROBERT R. BUTTERW1CK 
Subscriptions $LU0 Per 1 ear— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annviile post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



EDITORIALS 



MOTHER S DAY 

Last Sunday was Mother s Day. How did you fulfil its obli 
ligations^ Did you at the last moment, remember to sena nei 
a ten-cent card.-' Did you sena iier Bowers, candy or some trinket 
winch she will cherisii only because you sent its' Did you wear 
a Lower tor her, or send her a letter telling her how much you 
appreciate her— and possiDly lor the hrst time this year— omit 
asking her to send you something? Or did you forget all about 
Mother on Mother s Dayr 1 Jtf you did remember her in some 
way, do you think it was for value received? Can a ten-cent 
Ccurd witn a stereotyped sentiment repay full value for ail a 
mother s love and sacrifice? However beautiful or costly our 
Mother's Day ottering may be it cannot cover the many letters 
of complaints and crabbing about the delayed check or box 
which mother receives in the course of a year; nor the strain oi 
working feverishly that daughter may have the new dress in 
time for some college event. Perhaps Mother's Day reminds us 
of the holiday visit tor which Mother longed, but we were too 
much rushed with dances and parties to spend a (little time at 
home. Is Mother working our way through college? In that 
case we can never repay her sacrifices, but we might forget to 
mention money or our needs as often a$ we have done. We 
admire Lincoln and those great and famous men who attribute 
all their success to their Mothers — Let us pennit our admiration 
of them to be our urge to lighten the burdens which our own 
Mothers must bear. And let us remember to make our appre 
ciation of Mother concrete, mot by feelings and sentiment only 
but in words and deeds. 



College Calendar 



Thursday May 12 

6:10 P.M.— Ministerium. 

7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 

8:00 P.M.— College Band practice. 

8:00 P.M.— Recital, Engle Hall. 
Glee Club Concert, Lebanon. 

Friday, May 13 

7:00 P.M.— Regular session of Lit- 
erary Societies. 

Sataurday, May 14 

3:00 P.M. Mt. St, Mary's vs. L. V. 
at home. 

Sunday, May 15 
5:45 P.M.— Y. M. and Y. W. De- 
votional Services. 

Monday, May 16 
4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M.— Reader's Club. 
9:00 P.M.— Men's Senate. 

Tuesday, May 17 
4:00 P.M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 
6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer Meeting. 

Wednesday, May 18 
3:00 P.M.— Base Ball, Muhle.iberg 
vs. L. V., away. 

4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board 

Thursday May 19 
6:00 P.M. — Ministerium. 
7:00 P.M.— Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 
8:00 P.M.— College Band Practice. 
8:00 P.M.— Recital. 

Friday, May 20 
8:00 P.M — Regular session, Liter- 
ary Societies. 

Saturday, May 21 
3:00 P.M. — Base Ball, F. and 
vs. L. V., at home. 

Sunday, May 22 
5:45 P.M.— Y. W. Devotional 
vice. 

Monday, May 23 
4:00 P.M. — Student Volunteer. 
7:00 P.M.— Writer's Club. 
9:00 P.M. — Men's Senate. 

Tuesday, May 24 
4:00 P. M.— Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 
6:10 P.M.— Student Prayer Meet 
ing. 

Wednesday, May 25 
4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board. 



ALUMNI 

The past week end has just demonstrated how much our 
Alma Mater stll serves as a reunion ground for Alumni. The 
graduates who have gathered are of course mainly those wh 
have received from the institution an early inspiration, which 
they have carried with them into business careers or, which may 
have been responsible for sending them into their life profes 
sion. But more than this,/ — they seem to assemble with dee 
affection in haunts that have grown sacred to them, where they 
meet with other "kindred spirits". We have men in every pro 
fession to-day who tell us that they are conscious of havin 
more power and incentive because of college days spent here 
Our strength and contribution thus reaches into many conspic 
uous and many out of the way places of life. We rejoice in th 
silent sweeps of this influence and the fartherest thing from our 
minds is to ask credit for it. 

Glad as the Alumni seemed to get back, the under-graduates 
were just as glad to see them. The students recognize •an 
deeply appreciate the efforts of the Alumni to make a bigger 
and better Lebanon Valley. Hence there is a firm relation 
between college and alumni. We can both work together for 
great mutual benefit. The .more the alumni do, the more 
means to the college; and the greater the college becomes, th 
more she will mean to the alumni. 

Come again! 



M 



Ser- 



PHILOS END SIXTY 
YEAR'S ACTIVITY WITH 
FRIDAY EVENING 

PROGRAM 




"O wad some Pow'r the giftie &e us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



—BURNS 



Stut—stut— stutter! My j-j- joints were coming apart with 
every stutter. 1 had fallen asleep in a big wig, but tne wearer 
was dashing about ana slaming on his hat with so much energy, 
stuttering all the while, that to avoid being crushed 1 droppeu 
„ently out of the wig into the leathers of a huge bonnet, ihe 
bonnet was so loudly red that it kept me awake and 1 had a 
good time watching what went on around me. 'there was a 
puch bowl on the taole but it held nothing exciting. The gentle- 
men were quiet reckless with their quesues. 1 was afraid the 
candles would roast the pig tails. And f noticed that every one 
said such exciting things. 1 heard one man tell the company 
that the lady in brown had seventy children. To me snult seems 
to be more practical than gum.. i v or one thing you can't stick" 
snult under seats and then too it would save tne girts a lot oi 
money spent on vanity cases which the fellows steal, because 
the tellows could carry snuli boxes which might have compart- 
ments lor rouge and powuer. Of course snuri can't be cracked 
like gum, but there is always the chance of a sneeze, .being- 
only a worm 1 have often wondered whether in the days when 
men wore knee-breeches, they knew enough to stop runners 
when they occured. borne one told me that the reason women 
don't use fans as freely as they used to was because the fans; 
blew away too much powder. Yes, sir 1 certainly enjoyed that 
play, it gave me loud lor thought. 



Dr. Gossard and Prof. Gingrich held a coming out party at 
the foot of the stair-case in hmgle Hail immediately after the 
Philo play. All the high brows attended (and Mister Bovino). 



Since Pass Bollinger rerolled the tennis court the feelings 
of the Preshmen are very much hurt, and they absolutely refuse 
to roll them next year. 



Mennonite — Special Delivery — Garabalbi — Moose-tooth— 
ney Whale — Broady — Economics — Cheesy — Bright-eyes — Mooney 
you bad boy — Pamily table — Two Gun — 

—It's neither a cross word puzzle nor a list of Preshmen 
theme titles — see our next for the solution. 



Since the Kalo play Hazleton spends a good deal of time in 
the library reading the "Cyclopedia of Social Usage". 



NOT km-; 

Pres. and Mrs. G. D. Gossard 
will entertain all the members o f 
the Senior class of L. V. C. at an 
"Indoor May Meet" in the college 
gymnasium on Friday, May 20, 
1927 at 8 o'clock. 



LITTLE FAE'S DADDIE: "How is 
it young man that I found you kiss- 
ing my daughter? How is it I ask 
you 



CUNJACK: 
great." 



"Oh it's great, it's 



We heard that Wheeler met a girl 
called "Dizzie" in a revolving chair, 
and he's been going around with her 
ever since. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

1750 veering sharply at times from 
the tragic to the comic or the comic 
to the tragic. The audience was 
held in suspense throughout and 
showed its pleasure by generous ap 
plause. Credit can be given to no 
single participant in the play. 

Philo can do no more than to ex 
press their most sincere appreciation 
of the part played by Dr. Wllace in 
the production of the play. Its sue 
cess is a testimonial in itself of his 
work. For the assistance of Miss 
Mary K. Wallace the society is truly 
grateful. To those members of the 
cast who gave of their time and effort 
and especially to those members o 
our sister societies who assisted us. 
we express our thanks. Finally, to 
those members of the faculty and to 
the friends who assisted in any way 
to make the play and the anniver- 
sary such a great success, Philo is 
deeply obligated. 

After the program in Engle Hall, 
the audience visited the Alumni gym- 
nasium for the reception accorded 
it. The decorations in the gymnasium 
were the most exquisite ever pro- 
duced on the campus. A scene cf 
old Japan seemed to have been trans- 
ported for the purpose. Flowers and 
cherry blossoms were present in pro- 
fusion. Luke S. Mimura deserves 
special commendation for this work. 

A social time was arranged in the 
gym. An orchestra furnished music 
during the evening and refreshments 
were served a la cafeteria. Philo's 
giant birthday cake weighed almost 
100 pounds and was sent to the so- 
ciety by J. G. Meyer. 

The blinking sign of welcome over 



Every two hundred flowers which go to seed on the campus 
means one quart less of dandelion wine. 



Last week a Coed and a student took a walk. 



I saw a Frosh go into the chicken yard for a tennis ball and 
come out with an egg. 



Why did the students laugh when the chapel speaker stated 
that he found many improvements at L. V,, dancing classes 
being one of them? 

— The Campus Worm 



the doors of the Ad building proved 
a point of interest to all. The same 
was true of the "fish bowl" in the 
gym. Philo closed its sixtieth year 
in a very appropriate fashion. 

The characters in the play were 
as follows: 

David Garrick Wade S. Miller 

Mr. Simon Ingot, Albert H. Kelchner 

Squire Chivy Elmer A. Keisei 

Mr. Smith Harvey L. Nitrauer 

Mr. Browne Millard J. Miller 

Mr. Jones J. Bruce Behney 

Thomas Henry A. Kohler 

George, Garrick's valet, 

Walter D. Pugh 

Ada Ingot Myra O. Shaefter 

Mrs. Smith Jennie Shoop 

Miss Arminta Browne 

Nellie G. Rabenstine 



GIRLS GIVE TWO 

MORE RECITALS 



Dr. G. D. Gossard, if his physician 
permits him, expects to attend a meet- 
ing of the Board of Education of the 
U. B. Church in Christ at Bonebrake 
Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio 
on Tuesday. 



(Continued from page 1) 

ative audience in the Parish House 
at Palmyra. Judging from the ap- 
plause the program must have been 
enjoyed. After the concert the girls 
were delightfully entertained at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Engle- 
The program follows: 
To the Spirit of Music (Stephens). 
The Club; A Pastoral (Cary-Saar) and 
An Irish Folk Song (Foote), 
Burrier and Club; Reading, Mis* 
Apgar; Aria (Weber), Mrs. Harnish; 
Ode to the River (Drigo-Silver)- 
Thy Beaming Eyes (MacDowelD' 
April, My April (Milligan), The Club; 
Quartet— All Thru The Night (RW 
Herbert); Ave-Maria (Bach-Gounod)- 
Mrs. Harnish, Miss Saylor and C\^°> 
(Violin Obligato, Miss Schlicter)- 
Duet, Mrs. Harnish and Miss Sayl° r; 
In Spain (Chiara) and Habaner 9 
(Bizet), Miss Burrier and CW^ 
Reading, Miss Apgar; Spring Sy 111 ? 

tu» fl 



hony 
Club. 



(Goslon), Mrs. Harnish 



r 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 12, I 



PAGE THREI_ 



L. V. SINKS W. MD. 

AND SCHUYLKILL 



(Continued from Page 1) 
lege for the second time this season 
2-1- 

In this game, Clemens, the first man 
to face Zappia, singled, stole second, 
and scored on White's single. This 
ended Schuylkill's scoring. Zappia 
pitching air tight ball, blanked them 
for the remaining eight innings, al- 
lowing them only two more bingles. 

Lebanon Valley tied the score in 
the fifth on two walks, a hit batsman 
and Gelbert's fielders choice. L. V. 
scored again in the sixth when Piersol 
singled, and took second on Mayer's 
sacrifice and scored on Metoxen's 
double. 

Piersol was the big man at bat for 
L. V., along with Metoxen, whose 
timely double drove in the wjnning 
run. Zappia allowed Schuylkill four 
hits, two of them in the first inning 
producing their only run. 

The box scores: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

AB R H A E 

Hendricks, rf 2 1 

Albright, cf 4 3 

Wentz, lf-2b 4 112 

Gelbert, ss 4 2 1 4 1 

Piersol, lb 4 12 4 10 

Piela, p 3 1 2 1 2 J 

Moyer, 2b 2 1 

Metoxen, c 3 1 12 1 

Smith, 3b 3 1 1 

Hagar, rf-lf 1 

Zappia, rf 1 

Totals 31 5 8 27 5 3 

WESTERN MARYLAND 

AB R H O A E 

McMains, ss 4 1 4 1 

Keen, p 4 3 8 

Ellis, 2b 3 1 

C. Smith, If 4 1 1 

Weisheck, c 4 115 1 

Long, 3b 4 13 10 

Smith, rf 4 

Clarke, lb 2 1 12 

Havens, cf 3 ) 2 

Totals 32 3 5 24 13 3 

W. Maryland ..0 1 2 0—3 
L. V. C. , 2 1 2 x— 5 

Sacrifice Hits — Piela, Moyer. Two- 
Base Hits — Metoxen, Keen, Stolen 
Bases — Gelbert, Piersol, Keen 2 
Struck Out by Piela 12; by Keen 4. 
First Base on called balls — Off Pieia 
2; off Keen 1. Hit by Pitcher- Clarke 

Umpire: Gallagher. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

AB R H O A E 

Hendricks, rf 2 2 

Albright, cf 3 1 2 

Wentz, 3b 3 1 2 

Gelbert, ss 3 4 2 

Piela, If 4 1 3 

Piersol, lb 3 1 3 6 

Moyer, 2b 3 1 2 

Zappia, p 4 112 

Metoxen, c 3 118 3 

Totals 28 2 7 27 10 2 

SCHUYLKILL COLLEGE 

AB R H O A E 

Clemens, 3b 4 110 10 

B. Kopp, rf 4 1 

White, cf 2 110 

Radcliffe, If ______ 4 1 4 

MacDonald, lb ___ 4 1 9 

Boylee, 2b 3 2 1 

Roth, ss 2 2 2 

Snader, c 3 5 1 

Albright, p 3 6 

Totals 29 1 4 24 11 

Schuylkill 1 0—1 

L. V. C. 1 1 x— 2 

Sacrifice Hits — Piersol, Moyer. Two- 
Base Hits — Piersol, Metoxen. Double 
Blay -Moyer to Gelbert to Piersol. 
Struck Out by Zappia 7; by Albright 
4. First Base on called balls— Off 
Zappia 3; off Albright 5. Hit by 
Pitcher— Wentz, Roth. 

Umpire — Gallagher. 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



KALOS PRESENT 

SHORT PROGRAM 



A very interesting program was 
given in Kalo Hall, May 6th, at 6:00 
p. m. It was thoroughly enjoyed by 
all although it was short in order to 
give ;he fellows time to get ready 
for Philo Anniversary. 

The Ocarino-a solo given by"Fritz" 
Rhodes put the boys in good humor 
for the lemainder of the program. 
John Bixler gave a very enlightening 
and interesting resume of the Miss- 
issippi River Flood. Calabrese took 
Rudyard Kipling's place and read the 
poem "If" to the delight of everyone. 
Hafer demonstrated his musicid tal- 
ent with a piano and drum combine 

The Kalozetean Literary Society 
congratulates the Philokosmian Lit- 
erary Society on the success of its 
Sixtieth Anniversary. 



FIRST FACULTY 

RECITAL HELD 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Moszkowski; Concerto in D minor, 
Bach; Pastorale; Sadness; . Abandon; 
Midnight; Serenata; Godard; William 
Bretz at the piano. 

The recital to-night at 8 o'clock will 
be given by Grace Daniel, piano; 
Bernetta Burrier, Voice; and Viola 
Wolfe, organ. The public is invited 
to all these recitals, 
accepted by Leopold Auer is indeed 
an honor of which Mr. Malsh can be 
very proud. 

Having resided in Philadelphia for 
the past two years, Mr. Jauss contin- 
ued his study with Sascha Jacobinoff , 
a master violin teacher of the Curtis 
Institute. The program was not only 
interesting to musicians but also to 
the general public. 

The program was as follows: 

Sonota in D minor, Handel; (a) 
The Old Refrain (Viennese Popular 
song) Kreisler; (b) Gondoliera, by 



CLIO SENIORS GIVE 

INTERESTING PROGRAM 



The evening of May 6 was given 
over to Seniors who made the t*W-» 
ihg bright in the domain of Ciio Hall. 
The Seniors gave a program interest- 
ing and amusing in every detail undei 
the name of "Senior Reminescence_." 
The program was: 

Freshmen Days Emma Madcliff 

My Idea of Professors 

• Bernetha Strickler 

Campus Strains Madeline Mark 

The Highlights of Campusology 

Jena e Sho'.u 

Acquiring Dignity Luctle Ivnrffi 

After such an enjoyable pvogrnm 
everyone realized how much the 
Senior Clionians will be missed. 

The Clionian Literary Society wish- 
es to congratulate the Philokosmian 
Literary Society on the success of 
their sixtieth anniversary. 



FRESHIE PROGRAM 



PUT ON AT PHILO 



DELPHIANS PRESENT 

NOVELTY PROGRAM 



1928 QUITTIE 

OUT NEXT WEEK 



(Continued from page 1) 

tiful Molloy cover advances the effect 
of the general theme which is "When 
Knighthood was in Flower". Several 
new features increase the book's ap- 
peal. The engravings, furnished by 
Hammersmith-Kortmeyer Co., cf Mil- 
waukee are of the best, while the 
typography is especially attractive. 

The staff, having worked patiently 
and well for months on this year's 
publication, nevertheless does not pro- 
pose to make any "wild" boasts. 
But — well — you wait and see! 

The number of copies is limited but 
there will be approximately twenty- 
five books for which the Business 
Manager has no subscription. Per- 
sons desiring to be sure of a copy 
should see Danny Pugh at once. And 
remember it's dedicated to the Al- 
umni Perhaps your dad or some 
friend who is an old grod will want 
one? Don't forget — Pugh is the man. 



OFFICERS SELECTED 

BY READER'S CLUB 



(Continued on Page 3) 
then turned over to the reading and 
discussion of the life and plays of 
John Galsworthy. 

The program: 
'Life of Galsworthy" __ Mae Hame. 
'The Skin Game" ___ Eleanor Snoke 

"A Bit of Love" Nelda Spalz 

The Reader's Club, having adanc- 
ed greatly during the last year, has 
a bright future. Each year it is in- 
creasing its membership and the 
scope of its influence. Its members 
are expecting next year to be even 
more worth while. 



Delphian enjoyed a seasonable no- 
velty program at their regular Fri- 
day evening meeting, May 6. It was 
extremely enjoyable in the fact that 
Delphian experienced all the thrills 
received in Spring storms. The pro- 
gram, entitled "April Showers Bring 
May Flowers", was as follows: 

Black Clouds Esther Flickinger 

Thunder Olive Weigei 

Lightning Sue Wishart 

Rain Winifred Peck 

Rainbow Elva Riegel 

Sunshine Sara Lou Rose 

Showers vs. Flowers Mildred Lane 

The Delphian Literary Society 
heartily congratulataes Philo on its 
successful Anniversary Programme. 



Freshie's Night was observed in 
Philo Hall on Friday evening, April 
29 with an interesting program by 
the plebes. Each part was well given 
and the first year men are invited 
back soon again. The program was 
as follows: 

Rules I would suggest for the Fresh- 

ies next year. D. Bovino 

Fresh Quartette __J. Rojahn, C. Keene 
A. Sitlinger, J. Snyder 
Debate: Resolved that the spring 
round-up is an asset to the Freshie. 

Aff: O. Sneath Neg: W. Myers 

Fresh Music R. Jacks 

Living Thoughts R. Sprecher 

It is interesting to note that the 
negative team was victorious after a 
well planned debate. 



FIRST STUDENT'S 

RECITAL TO-NIGHT 



HISTORY CLASS ON 

TRIP TO GETTYSBURG 



(Continued from Page 1). 
Eight automobiles carrying thirty- 
six people made up the caravan. They 
left Annville at eight o'clock in the 
morning, arriving at the battlefields 
about 10:30 The group gathered on 
the summit of "Little Round-top,'' 
where Pickett made his famous 
charge, and there Prof. Shenk por- 
trayed vividly the whol_ battle of 
Gettysburg and the events which led 
up to that momentous day. It was 
pointed out that the battle was sup- 
posed to have- been fought at Tany- 
town, that [f General Lee had seized 
little and big round-top the battle 
would have been won by the Con- 
federates. Before leaving for return 
trip at noon, the house of Jenuy 
Wade, the only civilian victim of the 
battle, was visited. 

On the return trip a stop was made 
at Chambersburg where the party 
visited the home of President Buchan 
non. In Carlyle the class paid hom- 
age to Molly Pitcher at the grave of 
this Revolutionary War heroine. The 
grave of John Harris, the founder of 
Harrisburg, was visited as the group 
came through Harrisburg. In Pax- 
tang a stop was made at the old 
Scotch-Irish church which contains 
the graves and histories of many 
local Revolutionary heroes. 

Every spot was thoroughly explain- 
ed in a most fascinating manner, and 
the members of the class report that 
it was a very valuable excursion. 



There will be a meeting of the 
Association of College Presidents of 
Pennsylvania at Washington and Jeff- 
erson College, at Washington, Pa., 
on Friday. If Dr. Gossard's health 
does not prevent him, he will be 
present at this gathering. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
for the Eurydice Choral Club. We 
are always eager to hear Miss Wolf 
at the organ. The students should 
show their appreciation for these as 
well as other spring recitals by their 
presence. 

The program is as follows: 

Come, Sweet Morning, 

Arranged by A. JL. 

Four Indian Love Songs Cadman 

; Vom the Land of the Sky-blue Water 
The White Dawn is Stealing. 
Far-off I Hear a Lover's Flute. 
The Moon Drops Low. 

Benetta Burrier 

Grand Choeur Rogers 

Viola Wolfe 
Si mes vers avaient les Ailes__Hahn 
Alia from "Mignon" Thomas 
"Sonnois-tu le Pays" 
Benetta Burrier 
Sonota opus 2, No. 2 (first movement) 

Beethoven 

Grace Daniel 

May Magic Stratton 

Spanish Song Koun'tz 

Spring Wtil 

Benetta Burrier 

Pastorale Foote 

Day Dreams Reiff 

Warrier's Song Riggs 

Viola Wolfe. 

Lotus Land Cyril Scatt 

Danse Nigre Cyril Scatt 

To a Waier Lily MacDoweli 

Scherzo a Capriccio Mendelssohn 

Grace Daniel 



Ulrica's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Studio and Home Portraits 
Films Printed and Developed 
Promptly 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Win. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



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OF QUALITY 

Annville _____ Pa. 



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738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



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4 



PAGE FOUR 



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NINETEEN TWENTY- 
SEVEN MAY DAY PA- 
GEANT GIVEN BEFORE 
COLORFUL CROWD 



(Continued from Page 1) 
as a result they made her theii 
Queen. Queen Nell, happy indeed to 
be their Queen, then told them of hei 
love for them. Gifts were given to 
her by Councilmen of the town ana 
the peasants danced for her. In the 
midst of the merrymaking, King 
Charles arrived and together they 
enjoyed this festive and delightful 
occasion. 

Miss Florence Dundore, as Queen 
Nell, was indeed a charming Queen. 
She made a lasting impression upon 
her large audience, thus upholding 
the popularity which she has esta- 
blished among the student body. 
Miss Nellie Rabenstine as Maid oi 
Honor also proved to be very attrac- 
tive. The Attendants to the Queen 
were Misses Kay Young, Madeline 
Mark, Gladys Buffington, Blanch 
Stager, Myra Shaeffer, Bennie Shoop, 

Mr. John Walter as King Charles, 
was an additional feature of the pro- 
gram. He indeed presented a regal 
appearance and was a fitting mate 
for the Queen. The Gentlemen of the 
Court were Messrs "Walter L. Ness, 
Wade S. Miller and Henry Ludwig. 

O. Pass Bollinger, as Court Jester, 
performed to the delight of the audi- 
ence. Even the Court ladies and 
gentlemen found it hard not to smile 
when he clung to the May pole with 
the Chefs monkey. The Mayor of 
Hereford was Raymond Koch. The 
Townsmen were the presidents of 
their respective classes. The Peasant 
Dancers composed of Freshmen, dem- 
onstrated their ability in performing 
for the Queen. The Fairies, who 
were Sophomore girls drew several 
nods of approval from the Queen. 
The Taterlude "Pyramis and Thisbe" 
proved to be very amusing as well 
as interesting. The May Pole Dancers 
who were Junior boys and girls, pre- 
sented a pleasing appearance as they 
danced about the May Pole. The 
Heralds, Frederick Miller and Miles 
S. Kiehner warned the whole country 
side with their clear, clarion warning 
to "Make way for the Queen." 

The audience was a very appreci- 
ative one end it was inspiring to have 
a crowd of people assembled like the 
one that witnessed this year's May 
Day activities. Again another May 
Day festivity has passed into the 
history of Lebanon Valley-one which 
will long be remembered. 

Grateful acknowledgement is due 
Mrs. Green, Miss Green, Miss Mary 
K. Wallace, Miss Shaw, Miss Alice 
Kindt, Mr. H. D. Albright and others 
who made this occasion a decide! 
success. 



GLEE CLUB HOLDS 

MAY DAY CONCERT 



(Continued from Page 1) 
joyed by all and Prof. Rogers is to 
be complimented upon the club which 
he has put together and trained in 
spite of adverse conditions. 

The musical numbers were all well 
received. Mr. Carpenter's solos were 
appreciated by all. Mr. Albright de- 
serves mention for his readings, as 
well as for the novelty sketeches. rlt; 
very vividly and effectively recalled 
to memory an old scene in which our 
own "Jit" was an active participant. 
Members of the 1927 Glee Club will 
always remember the York Y. M. C. 
A. cafeteria with a smile because of 
the comedy enacted there by our own 
clown. 

With the exception of a ?ingle 
post-season concert in Lebanon to- 
night, the season is ended and every- 
one is looking forward to the annual 
banquet. Needless to say, there will 
be no Y. M. C. A. cards necessary at 
this important event. 



SPEAKERS NAMED 

FOR GRADUATION 



(Continued from Page 1) 
the judges of the United States cir- 
cuit court of appeals for the third 
judicial district, while Mr. Fisher is 
a prominent Presbyterian minister. 

Judge Davis received his A.B. and 
A.M. degrees from Bucknell Univer- 
sity and a Bachelor of Divinity de- 
gree from Crozer Theological Semi- 
nary. He studied law at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago and at the University 
of Leipsic, and later received a 
Bachelor of Laws degree from the 
University of Pennsylvania, and an 
L.L.D. from Bucknell University. 

In 1907 Mr. Davis began the prac- 
tice of law and in 1912-1913 when he 
was a member of the New Jersey 
State Senate, he sponsored many pro- 
gressive administrative measures dur- 
ing the admisistration of Governor 
Wilson in 1913. After serving as the 
U. S. Attorney for the district of 
New Jersey and then as a judge of 
the U. S. District Court, District of 
New Jersey, he was elected in 1920 
to his present position as a judge of 
of U. S. Circuit Court of appeals for 
the third judicial district. 

Mr. Davis is a talented man, a 
ful speaker, an active worker in the 
religious work of the Baptist Church, 
and a leader in educational affairs. 

The Rev. Charles Allen Fisher, 
after graduating from L. V. C. in 
1903, received his M.A. from Prince- 
ton University in 1915, and a B.D. 
from the Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary in 1906. He served three pastor- 
ates since his graduation, one in 
Maualapan, N. J., one in the second 
Presbyterian Church of Providence, 
R. I. and at present he is in Wor- 
chester, Mass. 

Dr. Fisher has always been success- 
ful in building up his church in num- 
bers and in finances, and is active in 
the New England Synod of the Pres- 
byterian Church, having been sent 
three times to the General Assembly 
as a commissioner. His scholarly 
attainments, his ability as a pastor 
and administrator have placed him 
in the front rank of the ministers of 
his Church. 

Mr. Fisher has many friends in 
Lebanon and its vicinity for he is 
the son of Mr. John H. Fisher of Leb- 
anon, a prominent member of the 
Trinity U. B. Church in the same city. 
His brother is Dr. Geo. S. Fisher, a 
well-known prysician of Lebanon. 



HOWARD: "Can you take a joke 
seriously?" 

BERNITA: "But I've anly known 
you such a short time." 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET ,ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



W. S. G. A. ELECTS 

NEW OFFICERS 



On Monday afternoon, May 1st, at 
four o'clock, the Woman's Student 
Government Association met in North 
Hall parlor to elect members of the 
governing board for 1927-28. A vote 
on the candidates as presented by 
the faculty, resulted in the following 
board members being elected: 

President, Mary Geyer. Senior 
Representatives, Sara Lou Rose, 
Mabel Hafer, Olga Freeman. Junior 
Representatives, May Burkholder, 
Jane Fearnow. Sophomoie Repre- 
sentative, Anna B. Apgar. 

These of course are very responsi- 
ble positions. This year's board in- 
cluded the following: Mary McLan- 
achan, Kathryn Young, Mabel Hafer, 
Jennie Shoop, Sara Lou Rose, Mae 
Burkholder, Bernetta Strickler, Ruth 
Cooper. 



GIRLS HOLD PARTY 

FOR MRS. GREEN 

The girls of L. V. C. all joined in 
a surprise party for their dean, Mrs. 
Green, on Thursday, April 21. It 
was a surprise indeed, for the girls 
as well as Madame Green, for the 
program was unique. Madame Green 
told about her vacation and how she 
spent her birthday. She was then 
presented a beautiful basket of 
flowers from the W. S. G. A. The 
girls part came next. They showed 
their ability to entertain by giving 
the following program: 

Reading, Madaline Rife; Piano 
Solo, Fae Bachman; Spanish Dance, 
Edna Gorski and Elizabeth Matthes; 
Sketch, Jane Fearnow and Eleanor 
Snoke accompanied by Ruby See and 
Lucille Kann; Solo, Leah Miller. 



CHUBBY: "Old boy, I want to tell 
you how much I enjoyed your sermon 
last Sunday night — I certainly did." 

PARSON: "Thanks, but I thought 
you had a house date with your girl." 

CHUBBY: "I did— her parents 
went to hear you." 



SOCRATES: "When better jars 
are built, Ford will build them." 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

Annville - Pa. 
Bowling and Billiards 



L. V. CONQUERS G-BURG 

IN TENNIS OPENER 



(Continued from Page 1) 
The three freshmen, Shroyer, 
Hertzler and Fink, along with Herr 
played brilliant tennis in the single 
matches. Herr, coupled with Eberly 
and Shroyer teaming up with Hertzler 
ran through the Gettysburg doubles 
teams in straight sets. 

Summary of respective scores: 
Singles 
Shroyer — 6—5 — 7 
Kerchner— 2— 7 — 5 

Herr— 2— 6— 6 
Catell— 6— 4— 2 x 

Hertzler— 6 — 6 
Koch— 4—0 

Fink— 6— 6 
Fisher— 2— 4 

Doubles 
Herr, Eberly— 6— 11 
Catell, Koch— 3— 9 

Sroyer, Hertzler — 6 — 6 
Kerchner, Fisher — 4 — 3 

Team score— L. V. C. 6. G-burg 0. 




from your old 
shoes -We repair 
them lots of wear 



ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR 
COMPANY 




Fine 

Home-Made 
Candies 

LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 

A fine place to treat your 
friend 

TSCHUDyS 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. O. Bldg. 
West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



NO 




DROPS 
USED 

DR. HARRIS GRUMAN 

Eyesight Specialist— Optometrist 

GLASSES REPAIRED 
40 N. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

UNION EMBLEM CO VALLE p A L™, ™ 1Lmm 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery 

A^ Un M am i? enS V. << !? Vers 5i ai ' p " Pencils > Pennants; 
Art Novelties College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



K 



4 



ARE YOU 
READY FOR 
THOSE EXAMS? 



Ia$te (Eolkfjknnt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



REMEMBER THE 
ALBRIGHT GAME 
DECORATION DAY 



VOLUME II 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1927 



NUMBER 14 



Y.M.-Y.W. HOUSEPARTY 
HELD AT ML GRETNA 

Annual Conference and Social 
Gathering Promises to Be- 
come a Tradition 



The Y. M. C. A. and the Y W C 
A. held a joint house party at Mount 
Gretna over the week-end of May 13. 
Both the old and the new cabinets of 
each organization were present at 
this week-end conference and social 
gathering. The party left the college 
Friday evening after supper, and 
they hiked to Mt. Gretna, arriving 
there late in the evening. During 
the several conference and discussion 
periods that were held at various 
times all the plans for the coming 
year's work was discussed. The pres- 
idents led in these discussions, in 
addition to which Dr. Bennett made 
an interesting talk. The principle 
items were the big brother and big 
sister movement, the point system, 
and the Eagle's Mere Conference. 

On Friday evening the past Pres- 
ident of the Y. W., Miss Emma Mad- 
ciff, led the opening devotions into 
which all entered heartily. Saturday 
morning the two retiring Presidents 
Miss MadcifF and Mr. Miller spoke 
to the group about the purposes and 
present problems of the Christian 
Association. Following this Miss 
Eleanor Snoke, the new President of 
the Y. W., led in an open discussion 
on plans for next year. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



TWO RECITALS ON 
FORTHIS WEEK 

Splendid Program Presented on 
Tuesday— More Students 
Should Attend 



Another of the series of spring re- 
citals was given in Engle Hall, Tues- 
day, May 24 by Christine Evans, 
organ; Bernita Strebig, organ; Violet 
Krone, piano and Leah Harpel, voice. 

Miss Evans opened the program 
with a group of organ numbers with 
beautiful melodies which were well 
rendered. 

Every one enjoyed Miss Harpel's 
vocal numbers. Miss Krone's Bee- 
thoven Sonata and the rest of her 
piano numbers are worthy of praise 
with respect to technique and inter- 
pretation. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



KEISER 



SNYDER 

LEAVE HOSPITAL 



"Red" Reiser and "Dick" Snyder, 
both well-known juniors from our 
c ampus have both left the Lebanon 
Sanatorium, where they were con- 
fined for sometime. Mr. Snyder has 
been out for over a week and will 
s oon be able to leave the house, but 
Keiser has been out of the hos- 
pital only a few days. Both are well 
a nd will be back to school next year 
better than ever. Neither hopes to 
c °mplete his school work this year. 
Keiser was operated upon for appen- 
dicitis, while Snyder had an aner- 
a tion performed on his leg, which 
^as becoming infected due to imper- 
fectly removed pieces of steel lodged 
there. 



Mrs. Francis Conklin, white- 
haired grandmother who is a co- 
ed of the University of Denver, 
thinks the current derogatory cri- 
ticism of youth is all wrong. It 
was not Mrs. Conklin's pleasure to 
attend a college until her children 
grew up. When her youngest 
daughter graduated she entered 
Denver as a freshman. She has 
now come to the conclusion that 
"College life is not what the critics 
say it is". She declares that she 
is proud that her children have a 
better and healthier attitude to- 
ward life than she had in her 
youth 



GLEE CLUB 



HOLDS 



ANNUAL BANQUET 

Officers Elected for Coming 
Year After Annual Feast 
Held Last Week 



The Lebanon Valley Men's Glee 
Club brought to a close one of its 
most successful seasons on Wednes- 
day evening when they journeyed to 
Grantville and enjoyed the annual 
banquet of the club. With Prolsj. 
Rogers, Bender, Butterwick and Ging- 
rich, 23 members of the club mad-; 
the trip to Grantville. Chicken and 
waffles and country ham with all the 
trimmings constituted the menu for 
the evening. All seemed to enjoy the 
meal and there was plenty for all. 
Horst led the attack on the food and 
"Jit" got all he wanted on his Y. M. 
C. A. card. 

Following the meal, Bruce Behney. 
actink in the capacity of toastmaster 
welcomed the guests and then called 
for short talks from the following: 
Prof. Andrew Bender, Prof. R. R. 
Butterwick, Prof. C. R. Gingrich, 
Prof. George Rogers, Pass Bollingei, 
'28, John Walters, '27, Henry Bru- 
baker, '28, Harold Herr, '27, Hard l 
(Continued on Page 2) 



LAST WEEK'S RECI- 
TAL PRESENTS FOUR 

Misses Hess, Weigel, Linde- 
muth and Daniel Give Well 
Balanced Program 



A recital was given by Grace 
Daniel, organ; Hilda Hess, piano; 
Olive Weigel, piano and Pearl Lin- 
demuth, voice; Tuesday evening, 
May 17, in Engle Hall. 

Miss Weigel opened the program 
with a lively number and ended her 
group with Valse Chromatique, filled 
with runs which she played clearly. 

Miss Lindemuth followed with 
three German selections. She also 
sang a group of English song which 
she sang sweetly, producing good 
tones on the low as well as the high 
notes. 

Miss Daniel's organ numbers were 
a pleasing contrast to the loud and 
brilliant piano numbers. The sweet 
spring like melody in the Spring Song 
and the lovely Scherzo as well as her 
other numbers pleased the audience. 

Miss Hess played the well known 
Military Polonaise in a commendable 
manner. Every one enjoyed the 
brilliant Polichinelle. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



LEBANON VALLEY 
WINS-DROPS TWO 

After Losing Two Hard Ones on 
Southern Trip, Mylinmen 
Brace and Bump Muhlen- 
berg and F. & M. 



Annville, May 21:— 

Lebanon Valley won its sixth game 
of the season in nine starts, defeating 
Franklin and Marshall here this alter 
noon 5-3. Piela started on the mouncl 
for L. V., but was relieved by Zappia 
in the fifth when he filled the bases 
by allowing a hit and two walks. 
Zappia who relieved him was nicked 
for a double, three runs scoring. He 
held F. & M. scoreless for the r e 
mainder of the game. Lebanon Val- 
ley scored one in the second and fifth 
innings. L. V. scored three in the 
eighth.Zappia started the inning with 
a double; Hendricks beat out a bunt; 
Zappia was out on Albrights's field- 
ers choice; and Wentz walked, filling 
the bases; Gelbert's long sacrifice fly 
scored Hendricks; Piersol singled, 
scoring Albright and Wentz; Piela 
ended the running by grounding out 
to the shortstop. 



Washington, May 11 — Lebanon Val 
ley's two games below the Mason and 
Dixon line, while well played, resulted 
in defeats. Mt. St. Mary's nosed Uo 
out 3-2, in a game stopped at the end 
of the fifth inning because of rain. 
Chances are we might have won the 
game if the weather man had not 
interfered, since we had two men on 
and none out when the game was 
called. 

The Georgetown game was a hard 
one to lose. It took the Washington 
Collegians ten innings to set us down 
4-3. Zappia pitched a beautiful 
game, making it all the harder to 
lose. He allowed them seven hits in 
ten innings, which is pitching nice 
ball. Leading 3-2, Georgetown went 
into the ninth frame, confident of it 
ending in the regular time. But Wentz 
first man up, got his third hit for the 
day, Gelbert walked, and Piersol's 
slashing single drove in the tying 
run. Gelbert was out on an attempt- 
ed squeeze play. The next two men 
fanned. Georgetown and L. V. could 
do nothing in their half of the ninth 
and tenth respectively. A double by 
Graham, followed by O'Neils single 
scored the winning run for the Hill- 
toppers. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



POET-SOLDIER IN 

CHAPEL ADDRESS 



On Friday, May 13, "The Poet 
Soldier" spoke to the most attentive 
audience that chapel has been able 
to boast of for quite a while. The 
speaker, who was a member of the 
famous Rainbow Division, the first 
division of American troops to fight 
on the front, described very graph- 
ically the "high-lights" of the World 
War from a dough-boy's viewpoint. 
He rounded out. his address by giving 
several poems of his own composition, 
each of which "told a story" about 
the "Poet-Soldier" and his buddies, 
A free-will offering was taken to he'p 
this most welcome visitor on his way. 



The president of William and 
Mary College recently announced 
that there will be no freshman 
rules next year. The freshman 
class a few days ago broke all pre- 
vious costums by breaking restrict- 
ions two days before scheduled 
time in defiance of the rules made 
by the student body and to the 
dignity of the upperclassrnen. 
That the old men had to have 
power to enforce rules was obvi- 
ius to them. Therefore they took 
the stand that unless power was 
granted to tribunals to enforce the 
rules by appropriate punishment, 
there was no need of having them. 



SECOND ANNUAL CLIO 
CIRCUS A SUCCESS 

Varied Performances P r esented 
on the Campus This Week 
Peases Seve r al Hundred 
Local Folk 



Clio's "Bigger and Better" Circus 
came to town as is usual with circuses 
in a cloudburst. This is the second 
annual appearance of the show in 
Annville The .fact that it had to be 
postponed from Wednesday till this 
Monday presented no problem, for 
the crowd was bigger than ever. 

The parade around the town began 
at 6:00 P. M. and by 6:30 they had 
formed the large ring on the campus 
of L. V. C. The circus added a new 
feature to its list this year in the 
form of sideshows. 

The events of the evening were 
set going by the bareback riders on 
their spirited colts from the Pine 
Splinter stables. 

The sideshows with their freaks 
caused no end of excitement, espec- 
ially the snake charmer, Senorita 
Carmen; Sophie, the fattest woman in 
the world; the woman immune to 
pain; and Mamie, the tatooed lady. 

The Indians came in with a whoop 
that sent chills down everyones spine. 
They caused quite a bit of disturb- 
ance and ended by scalping several 
white men. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



L.Y. TENNIS TEAM 
WINS AND LOSES 

Locals Drop Match to F. & M., 
But Take One From Urisinus 
And Albright 



The Lebanon Valley Tildenties won 
two and dropped one in the past two 
weeks, winning from Urisinus and 
Albright, but losing to F. and M. 
Rain interrupted the match with 
Urisinus, Lebanon Valley leading 1-1 
at the time. From the type of play 
exhibited in the singles, the doubles 
sets would have undoubtedly been 
fast and closely contested. Lefever 
first man for Ursiinus, beat Shroyer 
of L. V. 6-2, and 9-7 in beautifully 
played sets. Herr and Hertzler were 
driven to three sets before they were 
able to vanquish their opponents. 
Fink set Tomilson down in straight 
sets. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



ELEC 



ION HELD 

FOR MEN'S SENATE 



Many Changes Noted in Next 
Year's Senate— Two Ties 
Require Extra Voting 

On Wednesday, May 11, the annual 
elections for the Men's Senate were 
held. Great interest was manifested 
in these elections becaus it is one of 
the highest honors of the college to 
be a member of this organization. 
Six Seniors, five Juniors and three 
Sophomores compose the Senate with 
the addition of one Freshman to be 
elected by the incoming class. Any 
member of the Senior class standing, 
except the day student, is eligible for 
the presidency of the Senate. 

This election proved to be one of 
a tie vote between Clifford Singley 
and Walter Pugh for one of the St ' 
ior representatives, and Howard 
Wentz and Dominic Calabrese for 
Junior representative. On Wednes- 
day, May 18, the tie was voted off in 
favor of Singley and Calabrese. Those 
who comprise our Senate for the year 
1928 are as follows: 

Seniors: Clifford Singley, Milford 
Knisley, Elmer Keiser, Samuel Meyer, 
Millard Miller. Day Student Repre- 
sentative, Walter Waggoner. 

Juniors: Henry R. Aungst, May 
nard P. Wilson, Dominic Calabrese, 
Miles S. Kiehner. Day Student Rep- 
resentative, Lawrance B. Derickson. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



EURYDICE GIVES 

LASTCONCERTS 

Lancaster and Harrisburg Con- 
certs Repeat Former Suc- 
cesses—Girls Broadcast 
From Lancaster 

The Eurydice Choral Club of Leb- 
anon Valley College, under the dir- 
ection of Miss Ruth Engle, has given 
two more concerts, one at Lancaster 
and the other at Harrisburg. 

The girls had the largest and most 
appreciative audience at St. Andrew's 
Reformed Church, Lancaster. Judg- 
ing from the hearty applause, the 
program was enjoyed. Miss Anna 
Apgar gave "The Highwayman" by 
Alfred Noyes instead of her usual 
reading. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



ENGAGEMENT IS AN- 
NOUNCED BY SENIORS 



The culmination of a four year 
campus romance came with the an- 
nouncement, at the Y.M.-Y.W. house 
party, of thee engagement of Wade 
Miller and Benny Shoop, both mem- 
bers of the class of '27. Mr. Miller, 
who is well known on the campus', 
due to his participation in numerous 
campus activities for the past four 
years, is universally liked on the 
campus. Since Benny is also very 
popular, the match promises to be a 
splendid one. It is rumored that 
Wade and Benny have "paired" since 
the second week of their Freshman 
year. "La Vie" unites with the stud- 
ent body in wishing them "lots of 
luck". 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1927 



latieColkjienne 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 

H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 

Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '3u 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLE*, '2b 

Clio MARY E. McCUKDl, '30 

Delphian *, ANNA B. APGAR, 3u 

Kalo . MILES S. KlEHNER, '29 

Philo JOHN W. BEATT1E, '29 

General JAMES C. HAZiiLTON, "60 

RUTH A. STU15HAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



College Calendar 



EDITORIALS 



CAREFUL ! 



i 



At the time that this is witten there is a report that there 
will be no Senior Play — an activity whose failure will be a dis- 
credit not only because it appears in the College Calendar in the 
Catalogue, but because it is a splendid and well-loved tradition. 
There may be several reesons lor the failure of the seniors to 
respond, it may be that the fault lies in their lack of the well 
known "class spirit and loyalty". This condition would of course 
be regrettable, but we feel that this is not entirely to blame — 
nor are others which have been suggested. 

For some time the administration — and unfortunately the 
student body as well, but for dillerent reasons — has been neithei 
encouraging nor supporting worthwhile student activities. This 
temporary (we hope) disappearance of a men's debating team 
is a "classic example". With a faculty cry on one side oi, 
"To the books"' and a student wail on the other of "What's the 
use" the value and the dignity of extra-Curricular activity on 
our campus are fading — slowly and weakly disappearing. Stu- 
ent activities' which really unlold the character and personality 
of the student as no prescribed college course ever will' are being 
gradually suppressed and discouraged. The proposed Point Sys- 
tem, if it limits activity instead of over-activity will be worse 
than a failure- Beware lest we kill the goose that laid the golden 
egg 



I I ! 



BUT THEN 

There seems to be a general tendency on the campus for stud- 
ents to want the honors a position will give, but to let someone 
eles do the work. This is true among the literary societies and 
all our organizations and campus activities. Don't complain 
about the dull programs which your society offers if you are one 
of those students who constantly refuse to serve on its programs' 
or who provide a substitute instead of serving. Substitutes are 
often inclined to throw an air of 'duty' around their production 
and substitutes lack the snap which your own presentation would 
possess. When you refuse to do what is asked, your are depriv- 
ing the organization or activity of the service of others as well, 
They will point to you as an example — you aren't going to serve 
why should they? You are not put on a committee merely to 
make that committee the required number, but because there is 
Work for you to do. Possibly you can do that work more com 
petently than any other student on the campus. Then do it whole 
heartedly» and be ashamed to see a task done in a slip shod fash 
ion by another, just because you were too indolent to do your 
part. If you know that for a good reason you absolutely can- 
not afford the time' or if you do not feel competent enough, let 
those in authority know and the work will be given to some one 
who can do it. 

Too many irons in the fire are worse than none at all. Don't 
accept many positions just for their honors, when you knoW 
that you can't perform their duties. It's better to be recognized 
for one service competently done than to be known as a student 
who never does what he is asked to do- 



Thursday, May 26 

6:10 .P.M. — Minisierium. 
7:u0 P.M. — 1. M. C. A. Cabinet. 
8:00 jf.M. — Uoliege ttand practice. 
8:00 — Student Kecital, Engle Hall. 

Friday, May 27 
7:00 P.M. — rcegular session of Lit- 
erary Societies. 

Saturday, May 28 
3:00 — Susquehanna vs L. V. at home 

Sunday, May 29 
5:45 P.M.— 1. M. and 1. W. i>e- 
votionai Services. 

Monday, May 30 
3:00 — Albright vs L. V. at Lebanon. 

Tuesday, May 31 
4:00 P.M.— Student Volunteer. 
6:15— Student Prayer Meeting. 
8:00— Student Recital, Engle Hall. 

Wednesday, June 1 
4:00 P.M.— W. S. G. A. Board 

Thursday, June 2 
4:00 — Juniata vs L. V. away. 
6:00 P.M.— Ministerium. 
7:00 P.M. — 1. M. C. A. Cabinet. 
8:00 P.M.— College Band Practice. 
8:00— Student Recital, Engle Hall. 

Friday, June 3 
4:00— State College vs L. 
7:00 — Regular Literary 
sessions. 

Saturday, June 4 

3:00 — Bucknell vs L. V. away. 

Monday, June 6 
8:00 — Beginning ot Semester Exams 



V. away. 
Society 



Alumni Notes 

Miss Nellie Seltzer, '12 will leave 
Lebanon High School to teeach Eng- 
lish and coach debates at Collings- 
wood High School, N. J. 

Mr. Earl A. Spessard, '11 will be a 
professor of Biology at Onochita Col- 
lege, Arkadelphia, Arkansas. 

Mr. Charles C. Peters, '05 who is 
now professor of Education at the 
University of Miami will become prof, 
of Education and Director of Educa- 
tional Research at Pennsylvania State 
College in the fall. 

Mr. Charles B. Wingerd, '97 who 
has been pastor at the, Presbyterian 
Church at Martin's Ferry, Ohio has 
been transferred to New Castle, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Mr. J. Maurice Lesher, '15 has just 
received the S.T.M. degree from the 
Western Theological Seminary in 
Pittsburgh. 

Miss Alta B. Bortz, '22 a teacher 
in the Junior High School of Lebanon 
will teach English in the Lebanon 
High School. 



MISS GILBERT IN 

CHAPEL ADDRESS 



Everyone, especially the girls, were 
pleased by the short but inspiring 
talk given in Chapel last week by 
Miss Janet Gilbert. She is Denomi- 
national Secretary of the Otterbein 
Guild, thus having much opportunity 
to deal with young folks and their 
problems. Miss Gilbert quoted sev- 
eral cardinal points for success, il- 
lustrating them extremely well. Most 
of us will remember especially that 
"insane people never cooperate". 
After her address, Dr. Shenk wel- 
comed her back to Lebanon Valley. 
Miss Gilbert talked at several church 
services during the preceding Sunday. 




"O wad some Pow'r the giftie rfie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see usr 



—BURNS 



The spring- round-up this year was a quiet affair. No one! 
noticed it except the Frosh and those citizens of Annville whJ 
live near the campus. 

George S. Brookes, ex-i6 University of Rochester, could not 
get his sheepskin because he was unable to pass Freshman Eng.' 
lish. Now with Walter B. Lister he is co-author of "Spread 
Eagle", a new play now running in New York. With finals so : 
near this should bolster the courage of L. V. Frosh, as well as; 
lend a ray of hope to any upper classmen who need it. Brookes 
has also written for "True Story", a good method for getting rim 
of Freshman themes. 



Judge Marshall's social experience has totally destroyed his 
faith in human nature- 



It was once feared that the present Senior class would do 
nothing to uphold the traditio n s of L- V. as a matchmaking 
institution, but the 'Y' house party saved the situation. 

There are matches sulfuric 

And matches phosphoric, 
But the safest to have 

Is a match with a cleric. 
This may be a bit premature to discuss, but the army alpha 
Intelligence test might be used to advantage at the Student Re- 
ception next September. Is here any better way to get acquaint- 
ed than to discuss with your neighbor whether a Papuan had 
two, six, or eight legs? And there is no cause for one to be 
bored when he is occupied in putting an x in that part of the 
triangle which is in the square but not in the circle, and a y in 
that part of the circle which is in the square but not in the 
triangle. 



FLOOKIE: "Say Mooney, do you 
know that Janet is going around tell- 
ing people that she made a man of 
you? You can bet my girl never 
says anything like that." 

AUNGST: "No, but she did her 
best." 



FROSH (from the sticks) : "What's 
this?" 

WISE KRACKER:" That's a shoe 
horn of course." 

FROSH: "A what?" 

WISE KRACKER: "A shoe horn, 
I use that for playing foot notes." 



ELECTION HELD 

FOR MEN'S SENATE 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Sophomores: James C. Hazelton, 
Rudy Cunjack. Day Student Repre 
sentative, Edgar Shroyer. 

The above mentioned will take their 
oath of office at the first chapel ex- 
ercise of the 1928-1^29 school year. 



When you go to bed late and get up early, 
Break every date, and the profs are surly; 
When mid-flopping seems much labor lost, 
And time wasted shows, too late, its cost; 

When dorms are quiet and papers crackle, 
Brains working hard unused to battle; 
When the library's more than a meeting place> 
And you hope and pray you'll draw an ace; 

When every prof's glance is meaningful, 
And you wish you had just a little more pull 
When you look for notes you didn't take, 
And plan how beset to stall and fake; 

When your diploma looks unattainable, 
Credit hours are few and to pass impossible; 
When next year's schedule sets your head in a whirl, 
And Seniors hear 'Soggy' snap and snarl — 

The final exams are near. 



GLEE CLUB HOLDS 

ANNUAL BANQUET 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Snavely, '27, Millard Miller, '28, Johr. 
Beattie, ' 29, Russell Fornwalt, '27, 
John Hafer, '30 and Wilson Lewn 
'29. 

The most pleasing speaker of the 
evening, however, was Darkes A'- 
bright, '28, who presented each mem- 
ber of the club with a slight toktn 
as the reward for faithful and effici- 
ent work. 

Election of the officers for 1927-28 
resulted as follows: President, J. 
Bruce Behney; Vice-President, Henry 
Brubaker; Secretary, Lanston Ment- 
zer; Treasurer, Darkes Albright; 
Business Manager, Pass Bollinger; 
Assistant Business Manager, Calvin 
Keene. 



LAST WEEK'S RECI- 
TAL PRESENTED FOUR 



(Continued from Page 1) 
The program was as follows: 
Morceau Characterisque Wollenhaupt 

Marche Grotesque Linding 

Valse Chromatique Godard 

Miss Weigel 

Minnelied Brahms 

Widmung Fra nZ 

Die Lotus blume Schuw3 nn 

Miss Lindemuth 

Spring Song Macfarlaa e 

Minnetto Antico e Musetta ^ otl 

Benediction Mystiale ___ Saint-Saens 
Miss Daniel 

Military Polonaise Chop' 11 

Polichinelle Rachmaninoff 

Miss Hess 

Spring Kouernien^ 

Sacrament MacDerm ld 

Sink Red Sun Del R' e £° 

Miss Lindemuth 

Scherzo B° nn 

Miss Daniel 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 2 0, <<) 



PAGE THREE 



j 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



i 



Mr. William Davis, who left two 
months ago for the Soviet Republic 
to make arrangements with the Russ- 
ian Student Bureau for the reception 
of the official American Student Del- 
egation, has just returned to New 
York City, and the Committee on the 
American Student Delegation to Russ- 
ia is now able to make public com- 
plete plans for its first summer trip. 
The Student Council of New York is 
an affiliation of the social problems 
clubs and several of the student gov- 
ernments of the New York University, 
New York School for Social Work, 
Teachers College, and Union Theo- 
logical Seminary. These oroups 
meet from time to time to hold in- 
tercollegiate meeting on China, Nic- 
aragua, Mexico and Russia, and other 
leading problems of the day. The 
committee has expanded its numbers 
and is now a national council with 
affiliated groups throughout the 
United States. 

—The New Student 



The eighteenth anniversary of the 
founding of Otterbein College was 
celebrated last Tuesday morning by 
a special service held during the 
chapel hour and extending through 
the following class hour. Professor 
W. H. Siebert, dean of the Arts Col- 
ege at Ohio State University and 
Miss Alma Guitner were the chief 
speakers. 

Dean Sieber, speaking on "The Re- 
lation of the Small College to the 
Large University" said, "In Ohio at 
least there is no such thing as the 
small college." He stated further that 
the attitude of hostility which used 
to exist between the university and 
the small college, has changed to an 
increasingly friendly one due in a 
large measure to the efforts of W. 
0. Thompson, former president of 
Ohio State University. "The remark- 
able increase in the number f stu- 
dents has eradicated all vestiges oi 
rivalry among the colleges of Ohio," 
he said. 

Robert Knight, student representa- 
tive, spoke of the purpose of the col- 
lege, stating that it was the produc- 
tion of men and women of good 
character rather than teachers and 
preachers as was so commonly sup- 
posed. 

Pres. W. G. Clippinger presided, 
Dean N. E. Cornetet and Dr. T. J. 
Sanders led the devotions. Dr. Clipp- 
inger is a graduate of Lebanon Val- 
ley. 



Oberlin College is scouring the 
country to fill the vacancy left when 
Dr. Henry Churchill King ends his 
term in June after twenty-five years 
at the head of the institution. Among 
those mentioned as possible succes- 
sors to Dr. King is Newton D. Baker, 
former secretary of war in the Wilson 
cabinet. 



In "no other American University 
is there a "Campus Day" celebration 
comparable to that recently held at 
the University of Hawaii. Typical of 
Hawaii alone, of the island ancient 
traditions, is the luau or grand feast 
Which is the main event of the day. 
Five long tables were arranged under 
tents, facing a platform where hula 
dancers and musical numbers enlive 
ned the luau. 

Visitors thronged over the Univer 
sity grounds at this celebration, the 
chief object of campus day being to 
acquaint the public with the work of 
the university. 

The University of Hawaii is now 
nineteen years old. It is one huge 
cosmopolitan club, having students 
of all varieties of color and race. 
Practically every country bordering 
on the Pacific is represented at this 
island university. 




KALO-GLIO HOLD 



JOHN 1 SESSIOIN 



Kalo and Clio held an^ enjoy aole 
aim seasonable program in cnupei 
last riiday evening unuer the cap- 
tion of "bpringume. ' 11 was one oi 
tne most successiul joini- sessions in 
tne History ol botn societies. 

Sprinj* was surely in the air ana 
just Uns type of program was nec- 
essary to clear tne minas ior tne 
exams so soon to loilow. Tne open- 
ing leature was a '"Spring Dream' 
an original paper by tne lamous 
authoress Alice iiindi. W alter vv ag- 
goner tnen responued with "Remini- 
scences of the World War", a very 
interesting and appealing account 01 
some of his experiences in that gieai 
struggle. After this talk, Violet 
Krone on the organ and Hen Luclwig 
on the piano gave us some masterful 
bits of jazz, proving again that .ney 
are truly artists. "Red" Caiabrese 
came next with his renowned inter- 
putation of Kipling's "If". 

After the program an hour or so 
was devoted to sociability at which 
time refreshments were served. 



SECOND ANNUAL CLIO 

CIRCUS A SUCCESS 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Not „ the least of the attractions 
were the tight rope walker and tra- 
peze performer. Their grace and 
ease proved their skill. Soon, how- 
ever bicycles entered the ring, and a 
race was matched which ended in a 
slight accident. That prepared the 
way for the great wild west show 
featuring the cowboys with their las- 
soes, but no one was roped in. 

There is always a cloud arising in 
a clear sky, and so on circus day the 
minstrel show presented a dark spot 
and plenty of action. 

The whole circus was a raoring 
success. The kiddies were amused by 
the animal performances, and tht 
older folks received their thrill from 
the shows and other attractions. 



EURYDICE GIVES 

LAST CONCERT 



(Continued from Page 1) 
After the concert the club-broad- 
casted part of their program from 
station W.K.J.C. at the Kirk-Johnson 
studio. This was quite a new experi- 
ence for most of the girls. 

The last concert was given at 
Harrisburg, Thursday eveneing, May 
19, at the Sixth Street United Breth- 
ren Church Harrisburg. The audi- 
ence was large. All the members of 
the club have thoroughly enjoyed the 
trips and hope to continue them next 
year. The girls are especially grate- 
ful to Miss Ruth Engle, the leader, 
as well as to Mrs. Harnish, Mrs. Mills 
and Miss Saylor, their soloists who 
have helped to make the programs 
a success. 



PHILO ELECTS 

NEW OFFICERS 



L. V. TENNIS TEAM 

WINS AND LOSES 



(Continued from page 1) 

Summary of respective scores: 
Singles 

Shroyer— 2-7 
Lefever — 6-9 

Herr— 6-4-6 
E r good— 4-6-0 

Hertzler — 4-6-6 
Strickler— 6-3-2 

Fink— 10-6 
Tomilson — 8-3 
L. V. C. 3; Urisinus 1. 



Officers for the closing term of the 
year were elected by the Philo Liter- 
ary society at a special business ses- 
sion on Monday, May 9. They are: 

President, Homer Weist; Vice-Pres- 
ident, Elmer Keiser; Recording Sec- 
retary, John Beattie; Corresponanig, 
Secretary, Uhl Kuhn; Critic, D. Leroy 
Fegley; Chaplain, Oscar Sneath; 
Pianist, Jacob Horst; Treasurer, iviill- 
ard Miller; Chairman Executive Com- 
mittee, Milford Knisley; Judge, Liner- 
son Metoxin; Trustees, Arnold Z.wally, 
Harvey Nitrauer, Haiold Rider; Ser- 
geant-at-arms, Albert Sitlinger; As 
sistants, John Snyder, John Rojahn. 

Friday, May 13 marked the beginn- 
ing of the Senior Oration program 
in Philo and the program was: 

We all labor against our own cure; 
for Death is the cure of all disease, 
Fegley. The 320th Anniversary of 
the first settlement of Jamestown, 
Klinger. Crafty Men Condemn stud- 
ies; simple men admire them; and 
wise men use them, Uhich. Vocal 
Solo, Sneath. Truth sits upon the 
lips of dying men, Sloat. Living 
Thoughts, Sprecher. 

On Friday evening, May 20, the 
following varieety of serious thought 
and humor was offered to Philos and 
friends: 

Current Events, Zwally. Where 
there is a will, there is a way, Keene. 
Beter late than never; but better 
never late, Hoffman. Why are Soph- 
omores so silly, Oyer. Socratic De- 
bate: "Resolved that the Ministry is 
a better profession for service than 
teaching." Affirmative: Stone; Neg- 
ative: Wise. 



EXTEMPORANEOUS PRO- 
GRAM HELD AT KALO 

The extemporaneous speeches given 
by several Kalos on the regular meet- 
ing night, May 13, proved very amus- 
ing as well as interesting. The 
speakers were by no means at a loss 
for what to say in spite of the fact 
of their being called upon "on the 
spur of the moment". One of the 
most interesting numbers on the pro- 
gram was Walter Waggoner's talk on 
"The Most Important Battle of the 
World War". Having taken part in 
several conflicts himself, he made one 
feel that he could see the whole affair 
in Kalo Hall. 

Following is the program: 
"The Most Important Battles of the 

World War Walter Waggoner 

"Gunga Din" J. Fiorello 

J. Gordon Starr 

J. Gordon Star 

Violin Duet '. Shroyer-Lewars 



i M. -Y.W. HOUSEPARTY 
HELD AT Ml. GKLiJSA 



Hertzler in the doubles for L. V. were 
the only ones able to break through 
the strong game Hashed by the F. 
& M. team. 

Singles 

Shroyer — 2-4. 
Lefever — 6-6. 

Herr— 0-3 
Fe a gley— 6-6. 

Hertzler — 0-6. 
Taylor— 6-8. 

Eberly— 0-1 
Schupp — 6-6 

Doubles 
Shroyer, Hertzler — 4-6-6 
Lefever, Feagley — 6-3-2 

Eberly, Herr — 4-1 
Taylor, Stroble — 6-6 



Franklin and Marshall, showing a 
fine brand of tennis, experienced no 
difficuly in taking their match from 
Lebanon Valley 5-1. Shroyer and 



Lebanon Valley emerged from the 
L. V. — Albright tennis match with an 
easy triumph 6-0. 

Shroyer, Herr, Hertzler and Fink 
won their singles in straight sets. In 
the doubles, Herr and Eberly had 
little difficulty, beating Asper and 
Youse. Hertzler and Shroyer paired 
up for the second set of doubles, 
whipping Bashore and Hangen of 
Albright. 

■ This is Albrights first year in the 
intercollegiate tennis field. In view 
of this fact they made a fine showing, 
and should have a strong team on 
the courts next year after this sea- 
son's competetive experience. 
Hertzler — 6-6 
Hangen — 2-3 



Shroyer- 
Bashore- 



-6-6 
-0-2 



Fink— 6-6 
Youse— 2-3 

Herr — 6-6 
Aspej- — 1-0 

Doubles 
Herr, Eberly— 6-6 
Asper, Youse — 4-0 
Hertzler, Shroyer— 6-7 
Bashore, Hangen — 1-5 

Total score— L. V. 6, Albright 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Despite tne" inclement weather the 
several hours open lor recreation anu 
social enjoyment were pleasantly 
spent. It was during the social noui 
of Saturday evening that Mr. Waae 
Miller and Miss Jennie Shoop an- 
nounced their engagement in a most 
unique manner. It was a splenaid 
culmination of the evening's enter- 
tainment. 

On Sunday morning Mr. D. Leroy 
Fegley conducted a Sunday School 
class, and there was also regular woi- 
ship. In a discussion following this 
some very commendable plans were 
made concerning next year's work; 
the working out of thee point system 
whereby awards would be given; 
The sending if delegates to the 
Eagle's Mere Conference; and the 
establishment of a goal. 

In the afternoon Dr. Bennett talked 
on a number of things that were 
most vital. He brought up the ques- 
tions of what faith is; at what time 
we become Christians; and the view- 
point of whether doing Christian ser- 
vice is a duty or a privelege. 

Thee party hiked back to Annville 
again after supper. The general 
sentiment seemed to be that the hav- 
ing of joint house- parties of the two 
organizations should becme a tradi- 
tion. This is the second year that it 
has been done. 



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Lebanon, Pa. 

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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1927 



LEBANON VALLEY 

WINS— DROPS TWO 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Allentown, May 18 — Muhlenberg un- 
defeated, until to-day, with a record 
of six straight wins, was treated 
roughly by the L. V. batsmen, suc- 
cumbing under a deluge of two base 
hits, 13-6. 

Blasting out sixteen hits, eight of 
them doubles and one a triple, Leb- 
anon Valley took the kick out of 
Mule-enberg. Every man on the L. 
V. team cornered one or more hits. 
The brilliant playing and hitting of 
Bendigo at backstop and the line 
lielding of Albright was not dimin- 
ished by the creditable performances 
of tfye rest of the team. Weidmoyer 
played a fine fielding game for 
Muhlenberg. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

Hendricks, rf 4 1 2 2 

Albright, cf 4 1 

Wentz, 3b 3 10 12 1 

Gelbert, ss 3 1114 1 

Plersol, lb 4 1 13 

Piela, p-lf 4 1110 

Bendigo, c 3 2 9 3 

Moyer, 2b 2 1 2 

Hagar, If 1 

Zappia, p 2 1 3 

Totals 30 5 9 27 14 2 

FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL 

Chapel, ss 5 1 2 7 

Sorochinski, rf 4 1 1 

Brown, 3b 5 2 1 2 

Grey, If 4 1 2 

Roberts, c 3 112 

Druckenmiller, lb 4 1 2 14 

Derstein, 2b 3 1 

Wausick, p 2 110 4 1 

Zendt, cf 3 10 3 10 

Totals 33 3 7 24 17 3 

F. & M. 3 0—3 

L. V. C. 1 1 3 x— 5 

Sacrifice Hits Gelbert, Moyer, Rob- 
erts. Two-Base Hits, Hendricks, Gel- 
bert, Zappia, Sorchinski. Double Play 
Zendt, Derstein to Druckenmiller. 
Stolen Bases Bendigo, Grey, Drucken- 
miller. Struck Out by Piela 6; by 
Zappia 4; by Wausick 1. First Base 
on called balls, off Piela 4; off Zappia 
0; off Wausick 1. Hit by pitcher 
Sorocinski. 
Umpire — Gallagher. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

Moyer, 2b 2 10 11 

Albright, cf 2 1 3 

Wentz, rf 2 3 1 

Gelbert, ss 2 10 10 

Piersol, lb 3 14 11 

Piela, If 3 110 

Hagar, p 2 1 1 

Metoxen, c 1 

Smith, 3b 2 10 

Bendigo, c 1 2 

Totals 19 2 3 15 5 3 

MT. ST. MARYS 

Beiman, If 3 1 

McGanigan, ss 2 1 2 4 1 

Henber, 2b 3 113 

Campbell, lb 3 1 2 5 

McCoy, c 3 1 4 3 

Buckley, 3b 2 1 

Ryscavage, cf 2 1 

Dooley, rf 2 1 

Kenigan, p 2 2 

Velton, xx 1 

Lieb, p 

Totals 23 3 7 15 9 1 

L. V. C. 2 0—2 

Mt. St. Marys 2 1 0—3 

Stolen Bases Gelbert 2. Struck 
Out by Hagar 1; by Velton 4. First 
Base on called balls, off Hagar 2; off 
Kenigan 3. Hit by Pticher Metoxen. 
xx Batted for Kenigan. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

Moyer, 2b 5 12 12 

Albright, cf 3 1 

Wentz, rf 4 2 3 3 

Gelbert, ss 3 3 4 

Piersol, lb 4 2 10 

Piela, If 4 1 4 

Zappia, p 4 1 

Bendigo, c 4 6 1 

Smith, 3b 4 3') 

Totals 34 3 8 27 11 4 

GEORGETOWN UNIV. 

McLean, If 4 10 10 

Glenn, cf 5 1 2 

Graham, lb . 5 1 2 11 

O'Neil, 2b 5 1 2 4 

Nork, 3b 4 

Hines, rf 4 12 10 

Phelan, c 3 1 1 10 2 1 

Donovan, ss 2 2 4 

Gillespie, p 3 1 

Birch, p 10 110 

Totals 36 4 7 30 12 1 

L. V. C. 2 00000001 0—3 

Geo'town Uni_l 10000010 1—4 
None out when winning run scored. 
Sacrifice Hits, Albright. Two-Base 
Hits, Graham. Stolen Bases, Wentz 
2. Struck Out by Zappia 3; by Gilles- 
pie 4; by Birch 4. First Base on 
called balls, off Zappia 4; off Gilles- 
pie 1. 



LEBANON VALLEY 

Hendricks, rf 6 2 3 1 

Albright, cf 4 2 1 4 

Weniz 3b 5 110 11 

Gelbert, ss 4 2 2 3 3 

Piersol, lb 4 118 

Piela, If b" 1 1 3 1 1 

Moyer, 2b 4 2 1 3 2 1 

Bendigo, c 5 1 4 5 3 

4appia, p 5 1 2 3 

Tuials 42 13 16 27 13 3 

MUHLENBERG 

Weidmayer, 2b 4 112 5 

bieinmer, c 4 117 10 

Dickert, rt 4 2 2 2 

Boielli, ss 4 112 1 

Ciymer, If 3 u 

Ciessman, 3b 3 112 

Lawson, lb 4 13 1 v 

Ureensoerg, cl 2 1 0, 

Weber, p 

nimble, p 3 1 4 u 

Evans, cf 10 10 1 

Totals 33 6 6 27 15 2 

L. V. C. 4 1 2 Z 4— Id 

Muhlenberg __0 5 u 1 0— 6 
Two .base Hits, JBendigo 2; Piersol, 
nenuricKs, Geibert, IVioyer, Iriela, 
Zappia. Three .Base Hits, Hendricks, 
jJicnert. btoien liases, ±>enuigo 2, 
Wentz, Geioert. First base on caileu 
Dulis, on zappia 2; oil Jvimoie i. tin, 
oy Titcher, AiDrignt 2, Wentz. 



1 WO RECITALS ON 

FOK THIS WEEK 



(Continued from Page 1) 
The flowing melodies in Mist 
Strebig's numbers remind one of the 
scenes which their name suggest. 

The. following program was ren 
clered: 

A Woodland Idyl Reift 

Aria in D Bach 

Allegro Pomposo Hoiloway 

Miss Evans 

Death and the Maiden Sehuoen 

Gretchen at the Spinning Wheel 

Schumann 

Miss Harpel 
Sonata op, 31 no. 2 (first movement) 

Beethoven 

Miss Krone 

Aira from "Samson et Delilah" 

Saint-Saens 

"L'Amour viens aider" 

Miss Harpel 

Angelus Massenet 

Madrigal Rogers 

Dawn ' Jenkins 

Miss Strebig 

Snowflakes Cowen 

A Bowl of Roses Clarke 

Maid of Mystery Manning 

Miss Harpel 

To a Wild Rose Mac Dowell 

The Eagle Mac Dowell 

Uncle Remus Mac Dowell 

Polonaise Mac Dowell 

Miss Krone 



This evening a recital will be given 
in Engle Hall by Mary Grubb, piano; 
Mary Hartz, piano; Hilda Hess, or- 



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gan; Mary Overly, voice and Winifred 
Peck, voice. 

The students are not attending 
these recitals as they should so let 
us encoruage the ones taking part 
by having a large audience. 

The following program will be 
given: 

Sonata Op. 31, No:l Beehoven 

Miss Hartz 
Dearest Believe. 
Were I Gardner of the Skies. 
The Night Wind. 

Miss Peck 
Suite Prelude Rogers 

Intermezzo. 

Pastorale. 

Toccatina. 

Miss Hess 

The Elf Man Welk 

My Lovely Celia Munro 

My Love's Like a Red, Red Rose 
Liddle 

Le Parlate D'amor Gounod 

Miss Overly 

Prelude Op. 28, No. 15 Chopin 

Prelude Op. 28, No. 7 Chopin 

Prelude Op. 28, No. 21 Chopin 

The Chase J. Rheinberger 

Miss Grubb 

1 Passed by Your Window. 
For You. 

The Lark Now Leaves His Wintery 
Nest. 

Miss Peck 

Valse A-flat Major Chopin 

Serenata Moszkowski 

Etude Un Sospiro Liszt 

Miss Hartz 
O Rest in the Lord. 

Miss Peck 

Barcarolle in E Minor Faulke ; 

Musette McGrath 

Sketch Thayer 



Editor, "La Vie Collegienne", 
Annville, Pa. 
Dear Sir: — 

I am very thoroughly dissatisfied 
with some conditions which exist at 
Lebanon Valley College and I wish 
to thank the staff of La Vie Collegi- 
enne for an opportunity to express 
my feeling on certain subjects. 

There is one condtiion at present 
with which I am extremely disgusted. 
No other causes so great a feeling of 
revulsion as the state of affairs which 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
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KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in, 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

Annville _ Pa. 

Bowling and Billiards 



exists between the males and females 
in our school. It might very well be 
said that after a single date, a couple 
is "regular"; by a second meeting, the 
pair is automaticly engaged and when 
the third becomes known, the mar- 
riage certificate is signed. 

As a general rule, no one else will 
ask the girl for a date because the 
fellows think her already taken. 
Then, too, none of the other girls 
wish to accept an invitation from the 
fellow for fear that they may hurt 
the first girl's feelings. 

Why should such a condition exist? 
Let us be democratic and permit both 
boys and girls complete freedom. 
Put away petty dissentions and dis- 
cussions when one does not follow the 
set rule. Let us mutually agree to 
follow our own thoughts and ideals 
and not be governed by age old cus- 
toms. 

I say — Away with "custom mar- 
riages" at L. V. C. 

I trust that you will publish this 
at your earliest convenience as a con-, 
tribution from 

A long-suffering friend 

Sammy Salmon. 




from your old 
shoes -Vfe repair 
them-lotsofvrear 



ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR 
COMPANY 




Fine 

Home-Made 
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LIGHT LUNCH 
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CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

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A fine place to treat your 
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TSCHUDY'S 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. O. Bldg. 
West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



NO 




DROPS 
USED 

DR. HARRIS GRTJMAN 
Eyesight Specialist— Optometrist 

GLASSES REPAIRED 
40 N. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

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Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

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FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 

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BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
ATl£ m ,? enS V Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants 

* ffisasts,^ JeweIry ' Lawn Tm - 

HARRY W. LIGHT 

43EAST MAIN STREET, ANNVILLE, PA* 



SCHOOL OPENS 
SEPTEMBER 
TWENTIETH 



Ia$ie (ScJkfjiennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SENIORS 
SUBSCRIBE 



TO LA VIE 



VOLUME II 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, Jt*fe¥ 9, 1927 



NUMBER 15 



Sixty-six Degrees In 58th. Annual Commencement 



BACCALAUREATE 

SERMON SUNDAY 

Special Music Prepared Dr. 
Charles Allen Fisher, an 
Alumnus to Speak 

On Sunday morning at 10:30 o'clock 
he graduating class of Lebanon Val- 
ley College will open their week of 
Commencement exercises with the 
Baccalaureate services. Charles All 
en Fisher A.M., B.. D., will deliver the 
address to the class. Dr. Fisher is a 
graduate of Lebanon Valley, having 
gone out in 1903. He later entered 
the Princeton Theological Seminary 
and was awarded the B.D. degree 
there in 1906. In 1915, he received 
his Master degree from Princeton 
Univresity. 

He is at present serving as the pas- 
tor of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Worchester, Mass. 

Special music for the Baccalaureate 
exercises is m charge of Miss Ruth 
Engle who has arranged a choir for 
the occasion. The services, as usual 
will take place in the United Brethren 
Church and the graduates will occupy 
a reserved section with the iaculty. 
headed by G. D. Gossard. 



ALBRIGHT TAKES 
ANNUAL B. B. GAME 

Sherrid, P.M.C— Albright Star, 
Holds Mylinmen to Five Hits 
Gelbert Stars for L.V.C. 



Lebanon, Pa., May 30. 

Lebanon Valley was defeated by 
her old rival Albright for the fourth 
straight year; in their annual base- 
ball classic 6 — 1. 

Lebanon Valley's lone tally came in 
the fourth inning when Gelbert lift- 
ed one of Sherrid's fast ones over the 
left center field fence for a home run. 

Albright had but one earned run off 
Zappia who did the hurling for L. V. 
The hitting of both teams was scarce 
and well scattered. In only one inn- 
ing was more than one hit made oft 
either pitcher. This was in Albright's 
half of the sixth when they nicked 
Zappia for three hits to push .across 
(Continued on Page 4) 



OFFICERS NAMED 

FOR NEW SENATE 



On Friday of last week a meeting 
°f the newly elected Men's Senate 
Whs held in the office of President 
Gossard for the purpose of electing 
officers. For President Mr. Clifford 
Singley was elected, Mr. Millard Mill- 
er for Vice President and Mr. Miles 
Kiehner for Secretary. Dr. Gossard 
s Poke briefly of the honor and re- 
s Ponsibility devolving upon those 
ejected as members of the Senate. 
* ft e newly elected body will not be 
°fficially installed until the opening 
°* the next college year, but a num- 
Dei ' of matters required attention at 
ni s time, most important of which 
^ as a revison and approval of the 
c olleg e rules and regulations. 



! Professor O. Edgar Reynolds,) 
professor of Education and Psy j 
jchology at Lebanon Valley College! 

i received the degree of Doctor off 
Philosophy frDm Columbia Univer- [ 
isity, New York City on June 1,1 
1 1927 at the 173rd commencement of j 
I Columbia University. Both he and! 
j Mrs. Reynolds went to New York 
on Wednesday morning to attend 
the exercises. 

Dr. Reynolds received his A.B. 
from the University of Illinois in j 
1916 and his M.A. from Columbia! 
I University in 1917. Before coming! 
j to Lebanon Valley College, he was! 
fan assistant in School Adniinistra- { 
j tion, of the Teachers College, Co-j 
j lumbia University. Lebanon Val-j 
j ley College congratulates him. j 

L v7drops se£ 

SGN'SJ.AST MATCH 

Tennis Team Suffers Defeat at 
Bethlehem in Season's 
Final Match 



Bethlehem, May 28 — 

Lebanon Valley closed its tennis 
season by dropping their match to 
Moravian 6-0 at Bethlehem. In the 
singles Hoffman and Shroyer, played 
three fast sets. Shroyer was leading 

5- 2 in the first set, when Hoffman 
started his winning spurt, that carried 
him to victory 7-5. Shroyer took the 
second set 8-6. The third set went 
to Hoffman 6-4. 

Captain Herr pressed A. Spaugh 
in a 9-7 set before Spaugh triumphed. 
The second set also went to Spaugh 

6- 2. Hertzler and Fink went down 
in straight sets before G. Spaugh and 
Yaick. 

The score in the first match of 
doubles by no means shows the great 
game exhibited by the losers, Shroyer 
and Hertzler dropping it, to Hoffman 
and A. Spaugh. Herr and Eberly 
followed their teammates losing to G. 
Spaugh and Yaick. 

The L. V. tennis team experienced 
a good season, in view of the fact 
that three of the four members of 
team were playing their first season 
of intercollegiate tennis. In six 
matches played they emerged victors 
in three, finishing the season with an 
(Continued on Page 3) 



ENGLISH DEPT. 

VISITS CHEF'S 



Professors in the English Depart- 
meut and their assistants spent a very 
enjoyable evening at a party at Chef's 
Place last night. A program of 
speeches followed a most delightful 
lunch, which began at seven o'clock, 
the party having left the campus ir. 
cars earlier in the evening. Both this 
and next year's assistants were pres- 
ent, as well as Miss Myers and Mrs. 
Wnllace. The party included: Dr. 
and Mrs. Wallace; Miss M. K. Wal- 
lace; Misses Esther Walmer, Alice 
Kindt, and Nelda Spatz; and Messrs. 
Donald D. Kulp and H. D. Albright. 



L. V. CLOSES 1927 
BASEBALL SEASON 

Team Bumps S. U. and Juniata, 
But Loses to Penn State 
in Last Games 



Annville, May 28— Lebanon Valley 
bumped off Susquehanna, in a game 
filled with many extra base blows, 
7 — 5 Five of Lebanon Valley's seven 
hits went for extra bases. The ability 
of the L. V. team to hit with men on 
on base accounts for their victory. 
Susquehanna scored only five runs on 
thirteen safe blows. 

Huntington, June 2 — Timely hitting 
behind Piela's pitching 'jeat Juniata 
here 5 — 1. Piela struck out ten men, 
being particularly effective with men 
on base. Juniata's only run was the 
result of a fluke three bagger. The 
hitting of Gelbert and Bendigo fea- 
tured. 

Penn State, June 3 — Lebanon Valley 
closed it's baseball season by dropp- 
ing one to Penn State 11 — 3. The 
State team made .^eleven runs on 
twelve hits, two of them homers. L. 
V. made three runs on eleven hits, 
being unable to connect safely with 
men on the paths. Piersol, L. V's big 
first baseman, was their outstanding 
player, cornering a double and a 
three base swat. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



TWO RECITALS 

HELDJLAST WEEK 

These Last Two Programs Mark! 
The End of The Spring 
Recitals 



1 Lebanon Valley will be epre-f 
(sented at the Y. M. and Y .W. C.j 
| A. Summer conference to be held j 
j at Eagles Mere, June 10-20. The I 
j representatives from the Y. M. ai t j 
j Messrs Bruce Behney, Millard Mill- j 
I er, Roy Flook,and Russel Oyer, 
j Those of the Y. W. are Misses 
j Eleanor Snoke, Ruth Strubhar, 
| Con ine Dyne,. Emmeline Shaffer, 
j Madeline Rife. 

j For many years these confer- 
i ences have been mountain top ex- t 
perience for College groups and I 
individuals. Over 600 interested j 
men and women students from col 
leges and universities of the midd 
Idle Atlantic region will attend. j 
| These nine days will contribute 
j much to the International student 
j movement now afoot. 



CLASS OF '27 TO 
GET SHE 



EPSKINS 



WRITER 



S CLUB 
CONTEST CLOSES 



Anna Mark Winner of Short 
Story — John Beattie Winner 
of Parody 



The last cf the spring recitals, 
given by the rnore advanced pupils 
of the Conservatory of Music of Leb- 
anon Valley College under the di- 
rection of Miss Ruth Engle, was ren- 
dered by Violet Ferree, Piano; Violet 
Krone, organ; David Shroyer, Voice; 
Alcesta Slichier, violin; and Edgar 
Shroyer, violin 

Miss Ferree opened the program 
with the lively Fantasia in D minor 
Mozart. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



GOSSARDS HOLD 

SENIOR PARTY 

Enjoyable Entertainment in the 
Gym Precedes Trip to Chef's 
Place for Banquet 



President and Mrs. Gossard proved 
to be very charming hosts on Fri- 
day, May 20 at the Snior Indoor-May; 
meet held in the College Gym. The' 
gym was beautifully decorated with 
flowers and also the class and society 
pennants. 

After the guests^.had been divided 
into two groups known as the Ens 
Society and the Rios Society an 
interesting and amusing program was 
rendered as follows: — 

(Continued on Page 4) 



The Writers' Club of Lebanon Val 
ley College announcd the Winners of 
the short story and parody contest 
in chapel on Thursday morning, May 
26: — first prize Anna Mark, second 
prize Alice Knidt, honorable mention 
Esther Flickinger for the short story 
contest; and first prize John Beattie, 
honorable mention Helen Payne for 
the parody contest. 

Dr. Wallace, the faculty advisor of 
the Writers' Club, after saying a few 
words about the sport of writing, 
called the winners on the rostrum 
and presented each with a curious 
little bag containing a fortune in 
gold. 

Miss Mark's story was "By His 
Deeds Shall He Be Known", Miss 
Kindt's "The Daffodil Lady", Mr. 
Beattie's parody on "The Raven", 
and Miss Payne's "A Day-Students 
Ride" will be published in the next 
issue of the "Chat Book". The re- 
mainder of the book will be devoted 
to the graduating class. Let every- 
one be ready with twenty cents next 
week to buy a "Chat Book" immed- 
iately for there will be only a limited 
number published. 



FACULTY -SENIORS 

ARE BIG-LEAGUERS 



The faculty-senior base-ball game, 
held last Monday proved to be an 
oasis in the -desert of exams. The 
bleachers were crowded, more stud- 
ents turning out for this than for 
some of the Varsity games. The fac- 
ulty line-up included: Stokes, Mylin, 
Bender, Bennett, Gingrich, Wagner, 
Richie, Grimm, Reynolds, and Butter- 
wick and Wallace, utility. Mylin, who 
pitched for the faculty, was "Foxed" 
several times. Reynolds, who also 
shone in the outfield, was daring on 
the bases. The umpire fielded well, 
while the other players made one or 
two errors in the course of the game. 



Commencement Exercises to 
Climax Activities of a 
Busy Week 



In its Fifty-eighth annual Com- 
mencement next Wednesday, Lebanon 
Valley College will confer degrees on 
sixty-six candidates. This constitutes 
one of the largest groups that has 
ever receieved degrees at one time. 
Beginning on Sunday with the Bacc- 
alaureate Sermon four days will be 
given over to activities relative to 
commencement. 

At ten fifteen Sunday morning, 
June 12., the Baccalaureate Service 
will be held at the College Church. 
Charles Allen Fisher, AM., B.D., of 
Worcester, Mass. will preach the ser- 
mon of the occasion. 

The activities of Monday will con- 
sist of the Annual Meeting of the 
Board of Trustes at 10:15 A. M. In 
the evening at eight o'clock the Com- 
mencement Music Recital will be ren- 
dered in the Conservatory of Music. 
An excellent program is prepared for 
this last recital of the year. 

Tuesday is one of the big days of 
Commencement week. This is known 
(Continued on Page 2) 



TWO SUMMER SES- 
SIONS SCHEDULED 

Summer School to be Held at 
Harrisburg and Annville 
Enrollment Large 



Lebanon Valley Collge closes its 
winter term of 1926-27 only to re-open 
the 1927 Summer term on June 20. 
The Summer School will not be con- 
fined to Annville alone, but will also 
be held in Harrisburg, as last year. 
The Harrisburg enrollment was even 
larger than the local one in 1926. 

Claude S. Chappalear, M.A., and 
Verno L. Mongun, Ph.D., have been 
added to the Educational Department 
faculty for the Summer term. Both 
men come well recommended. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



TWO SPEAKERS AP- 
PEAR IN CHAPEL 



It was indeed a pleasure to have 
with us within the last two weeks, 
two prominet men in United Breth- 
ren Church— Dr. S. G. Ziegler and 
Dr. S. S. Hough, Dr. Ziegler is sec- 
retary of the Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions and Dr. Hough is secreteary of 
the Board of Administration whose 
offices are in Dayton, Ohio. 

Dr. Ziegler gave a very interesting 
talk in chapel concerning Foreign 
Missions. Later he held an audience 
with the Y. W. and Y. M. Cabinets 
to discuss the methods of support for 
our missions for the next year. 

Dr. Hough related how the United 
Brethren church has been progress- 
ing, and pointed out the many ways 
in which improvements can be made. 
All will be pleased to have these men 
return some time in the near future. 



/ 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1927 



latieColkjieiutt 



PUBl 1SI1E1) BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiei 

H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 

Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '3u 

Athletics G- CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

clio MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delphian""""""-" ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

Philo JO HN W. BEATT1E, '29 

General " — JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTER WICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



EDITORIALS 



1 



HOW ABOUT IT? 



College Calendar 



June 12— Sunday. 10:30 A. M.— 
Baccalaureate Exercises. 
(Speaker: Rev. Chasles Allen 
Fisher). 

June 13— Monday, 11:00 A. M.— 

Meeting of Board of Trustees. 
June 13— Monday, 6:00 P. M.— 

Commencement Concert. 
June 14 — Tuesday — Alumni Day 
June 14— Tuesday, 2:00 P. M — 

Class Day Exercises. 
June 14— Tuesday, 7:00 P. M.— 

Alumni Banquet. 
June 15— Wednesday, 10:00 A. 

M. — Fifty-eighth Commence 

ment Exercises. 

(Speaker: Hon J. Warren Davis) 



CLASS OF '27 TO 

GET SHEEPSKINS 



This issue of LA VIE marks the last for the school year 
The Staff, in putting out these few issues since its installation, 
lias become "acclimated." We expect to do big things next year 
—for the School and for you. You can, help, as we have said 
before, with your interest and support. Fall in line! The School 
is progressing — how about its Student Publication? 

BEST WISHES! 

The LA VIE staiT, in this last issue of the year, extends to 
faculty, students, alumni, and friends best wishes for a happy 
and profitable vacation. To the Seniors we wish Godspeed and 
all manner of success next year and in the years to come. For 
the rest of us— may we all be back, looking forward ta a "bigger 
and better" year. 

GIVE US A LIFT ! 

Students— will you "give us a lift"? All of usi want a better 
LA VIE, and one of the shortest ways to attain just that is a 
larger and comprehensive subscription list. Seniors — will you 
subscribe? Do it now! AJumni— how about you or your neigh- 
bor, or your frmer classmate? Students— how about your dad, 
or your friend who is an alumnus, or your high school teacher 
who once trod these paths? Help us out! It means more for 
all of us. 



First F. and Al. eats our chalk; next our bats disappear. It 
the base ball season was longer we might have to ask for another 
endowment in order to support our tea. . 



Lindberg takes a cat across the Atlantic and is considered 
a hero. But many a student has taken a poney into the class 
room and never received even honorable mention. 



1 SENIORS-ATTENTION 

You will want to subscribe for LA VIE next year, lest 
j you lose contact with the campus and its people. See that 
I "Danny" Pugh or "Jake" Horst gets your dollar at once, or 
j al least leave your name witji one of them, with the promise 
j to subscribe at the beginning of next year. 



ALUMNI ! 



Fall in line! Send in your renewal at once. The busi- 
ness staff will appreciate any new subscriptions you could 
"land"— or information about people who would want LA 
VIIC. Thank you! 




"O wad some Pow'r the gi/ft'e gfe us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us! ' 



-BURNS 



(Continued from Page 1) 
as Alumni Day, and is a tradition of 
long standing. In the forenoon there 
will be a Business Session, wtih lunch- 
eon at eleven thirty. In the after- 
noon at one thirty the Class Day 
Exercises will be put on. Following 
this at three thirty there will be a 
Reception by the President and Mrs. 
Gossard. As a culmination of the 
day the Annual Banquet will be held 
in the evening at six-thirty, at Chef's 
Place. 

There will be but one affair on 
Wednesday, this will be the Com- 
mencement held in the College United 
Brethren Church. Judge J. Warren 
Davis, L.L.D., of Trenton, New Jersey 
is the commencement orator. Follow- 
ing the address President George 
Daniel Gossard will confer the de 
grees to the graduating class, and 
the prizes will be awarded. 

It is not possible to state definitely 
at this time the places where all the 
graduating membrs will be going and 
the professions into which they enter 
But it is definitely known that about 
twenty have positions as teachers. 
Several of the ministerial students 
are going to Bonebrake and other 
Theological Seminaries, and there are 
quite a number who will carry on 
post graduate work for other degrees. 
Mr. Manard Sparks has been awarded 
a Latin Scholarship by the University 
of Chicago. 

At this commencement there will 
be a few honorary degrees conferred 
by Lebanon Valley College. Two per- 
sons, Mr. Phares G. Gibble, and Miss 
Lillian M. Kell will receive the A.M. 
degree. A Conservatory of Music 
diploma will be awarded to Esther 
Koons. 

The following are candidates for the 
A B degree: Elmer Ross Andrews, 
Sara Elizabeth Blecker, Annetta May 
Boltz, Gladys Mar yBuffington, Sadie 
Amanda Daub, Miriam Rebecca Daugh- 
erty, Florence May Dundore, Virginia 
Katherine Edwards, Leland Reiser 
Fackler. Daniel LeRoy Fegley, Beatrice 
Boone Happel, Hilda Heller, Lucile 
Meek Kann, Albert Herr Kelchner, Rob- 
ert Theodore Knouff, Mark Hertzler 
Layser, Luella Campbell Lehman, Pearl 
Cathryn Lindemuth, Madeline Anna 
Mark, Mary Catherine McLanachan, 
Wayde Sellers Miller, Nellie Grace Rab- 
enstine, William Alvin Sauer Myra 
Olive Sheaffer, Jennie Elizabeth Shoop 
Carl William Sloat, John Luverne 
Snavely, Walden Maynard Sparks, 
Blanche Rebecca Stager, Bernetha El- 
berta Strickler, Clarence Erb Ulrich, 
John Floyd Walter, Kathryn Mary 
Wheeler, Kathryn Young, Charles Har- 
old Snavely. _ ' . 

Those to receive the B. S. degree are 
as follows: Ester Lydia Beyerle, Sam- 
uel K. Clark, Clair Milford Daniel, Rus- 
sell Seitz Fornwalt, Harold Warren Fox. 
William Forrest Hemperly, Harold 
Harry Herr. Henry Lester Ludwig, Em- 
ma Isabella Madciff, Robert Gaylord 
Martin, Luke Shigeyuki Mimura, Mer- 
vin Lester Morrow, Roy Vern Moucr, 
Walter Lee Ness, Homer Erdman Wiest, 
Karl Carlton Williamson. 

The B. S. in Education degree will 
be conferred on the following: Mary 
Catherine Davis, Adessa Fry Kistler, 
Charles Floyd Lichtenberger ; Emerson 
Metoxin. Grant Samuel Sttith, James 
Gordon Starr. Charles I?aniel Wise, Wal- 
ter Zemskl, Maurice Clinton Demmy. 

Those to receive degrees at the close 
of 1927 Summer School are as follows: 
\. B.)( Elias Jacob Kline and Esther 
Mary Walmer; (B S. in Education) 
Harrv Grant G^rberlch. Daniel Hamil- 
ton Gingrich Chester V. Koppcnhaver, 
Gertrude Hasslor Nisley and Guy Rudi- 
I sill Shumaker. 



This is the time when: 
Senior Men 

Try to appear at ease in cap and gown and wish they 

didn't have such big ears. 
Senior Women: 

Spend hours before their mirrors desiding as to whether 

the cap looks better tilted north, south, east or west. 
All other students 

are wishing they had never seen this man's college. 
Faculty 

rinds its reputation is being established. 



This worm has often wondered whether all professors— 
as we say — go to the bone-yard for their examination questions. 



The exam cartoon on the bulletin board last week was uain- 
fully prophetic. By this time many of us have gone on the rocks. 



The gym during exam week, furnishes a perfect subject for 
a still life painting. 



An old grad was wandering around the campus. His thoughts 
were of his far off collge days. How changed the college was 
from his own short days! The Old Grad sighed. Where were 
the beautiful, willowy, billowy coeds and the husky men who 
had walked the campus when he was a student? He remembered 
how the strains of guitars had echoed romantically across the 
campus. He had a vivid memory of the meeting of the Haasen 
Peffer Club. Were stray hairs still found in the butter, and had 
prunes and pears remained on the menu? North Hall steps shone 
bare in the light of the setting sun. The Old grad dreamed on. 
A crowd of students poured out of North Hall and went on down 
the hill. A 'uke' and a 'sax' echoing over the campus jon.e,. 
their noise to barnyard braying which issued from the Conserv. 
Dusk was falling and couples were slowly— very slowly — coming 
up the hill. Couples congregated around the steps of North Hall. 
Stars appeared, lights and shadows marked the campus. On 
North Hall steps couples were talking — talking. The Old grad 
stirred and lighted a stogie. After all, college hadn't changed 
much. 



Many a student before us, has lived on cheese and spaghetti. 
The Campus worm found the following verses- in an old "Bizarre" 
We should always remember that others have suffered. 

Was it cakes that I spoke of? Excuse the mistake! 
Look close and you"ll not see a sign of a cake. 
Cakes here at the college? Yes, sinkers no doubt. 
If you board at the college, you'll never get gout. 

We've a trick — we young students, you doubtless have heard 
Of calling our food by names most absurd. 
'PI uit dish is the "Doggies", and that is the "Dope". 
'Tis a horrible diet, — of course — we've lost hope. 

That dish is the "Bullets", — the one on the right: 
( )h, dear! they are hard! Will you have one tonight? 
That's our "Crisp Breakfast Cereal". We call it the, "Chan"' 
That's the "Cream". Have another dish? Don't make me 
laugh. 

That dish with the "Macaroni — Tomatoish" look 
Is one that is made by our clever new cook. 
You see that "Duke's Mixture"? That's made out of bread 
It's the principle diet on which we are fed. 

That dish, we think, is intended to dope. 
They try to conceal it by naming it "soup". 
Two beans, much cabbage, one small green pea, 
Just look in the bowl, that's all you can sec. 

(H. E. W.„ '12) 



The Campus Worm, because of exams, has had one eye sh*» 
for a week, and now he's going to curl up and sjeep until n e * 
September, dreaming about the funny Freshmen who will h clp 
to fill this column. —The Campus Won 11 



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4 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1927 



PAGE THREE 




? 



ley 

her 
t. 



s — 
>ns. 



Lill- 
ys. 



for 



hts 
vas 
ere 
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red 
the 
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all. 
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but 
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INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



the latesi 
Another?" 



Rutgers University is 
victim of the "Ask Me 
craze, according to the New York 
jlerald-Tribune. The answer given 
by the senior class to a recent ques- 
tionnaire are illuminating if not 
alarming. 

Mussolini, the Italian dictator, was 
favored over President Coolidge by 
a vote of thirty-two to seven as 
"the biggest man in the world" 
George Bernard Shaw also received 
seven votes. Concerning the question 
f "the biggest man in America" 
s ixty-seven seniors voted for the 
President as against eighteen who 
chose Gov. Al Smith. 

It seems that eight Rutgers seniors 
are not yet sixteen-or at least they've 
never been kissed. Twenty members 
of the class decline to smoke while 
seventy-one admit a liking for the 
weed. Fifty-one of the graduates-to- 
be would rather have a Phi Beta 
Kappa key than a varsity letter, while 
thirty-four would prefer the athletic 
honor. 



A bewildering paradox has occurr 
ed in the senior class at Auburn Uni 
versity, Alabama. Only five men in 
the class pledged themselves to 'turn 
up' any classmate he saw cheating 
on an examination, and yet the ma- 
jority wished to maintain the honor 
system. In an effort to ascertain the 
real feeling on the Auburn campus, 
the senior class has submitted the fol 
lowing questionaire to be signed by 
those individuals who wish to signify 
their support of the system: "I here 
by pledge myself to support the hon- 
or system to the extent that I shall 
report any violations of its constitu- 
tion that come to my attenton." 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



KALOZETEANS 

CLOSE YEAR 



DELPHIAN TEA 

DELIGHTS MANY 



Kalo closed the 1926-27 year with 
two senior programs. A final busi- 
ness meeting was also held, for the 
installation of next year's officers, 
final reports of committees, and so on. 
Kalo wishes everyone a "big" vaca 
tion and extends to the Seniors best 
wishes for all sorts of success. 



TWO RECITALS 

HELD LAST WEE* 



Students of Washngton and Jeff- 
erson College have revolted against 
the rulings on absences which con- 
tinue to become more severe. At a 
student meeting held recently, a pe- 
tition was drawn up, voicing the 
general opinions in favor of abolishing 
the faculty committee on absences, 
and was submitted for adoption. A 
favorable adjustment of the matter is 
expected soon, especially since the 
administration has communicated 
with other colleges and universities 
to determine their policies concern- 
ing absences. 



COLUMBIA SPECTATOR 

We need snap courses. Good stud- 
ents take them in order to have time 
to concentrate on other subjects that 
happen to interest them more— and 
that in itself justifies them, if ever 
they need justification; poor students 
take them becalse they are easy, and 
not infrequently interesting; and why 
not? As long as one hundred 
and twenty-four points are required 
auiq aq; su Suoj stj 'upisdaaqs e -ioj 
of "both kinds of students is so com- 
pletely taken up, just so long will 
snap courses fill a dependable want 
in the curricular mart. 



L. V. DROPS SEA- 
SON'S LAST MATCH 



(Continued from page 1) 
§ven break. We look for a better 
season next year, since captain Hen 
ls the only man lost through gradua- 
tion. 

Summary of scores: 
Shroyer— 5-8-4 



Hoffman— 7-6-6 
Hertzler— 2-4 
G. Spaugh — 6-6 
Shroyer, Hertzler 
Hoffman, A. Spaugh 
Herr, Eberly— 4-1. 
G. Spaugh, Yaick— 6-6. 



Herr— 7-6-6 
A. Spaugh — 9-6 
Fink— 3-1 
Yaick — 6-6 
6-3. 
8-6. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Mr. David Shroyer followed with 
"The Trumpter" by Dix and Road 
ways" by Densmore. 

Miss Slichter and Mr. Shroyer then 
played Violin Duet No.l by Pleyel 
This being the only number of its 
kind that has been gvein at the 
spring recitals. 

Miss Krone then played "Hymn of 
Glory" by Yon followed py a selec- 
tion from "Paliacci" Leoncavallo by 
Mr. Shroyer. 

Miss Slichter played a voliin solo, 
Berceuse from "Jocelyn" by Godard, 
this piece has a sweet melody ass well 
as several difficult runs which were 
well rendered. 

Miss Ferree followed with three 
pieces by Schumann, Warum, Grillen 
and Romance, also a piece called In- 
vitation to the Dance by Weber. The 
first three pieces had flowing melo- 
dious while the last piece was filled 
with runs all of which were clearly 
played. We all love to hear Miss 
Ferree pay the piano. 

Mr. David Shroyer sang "I Heard 
you Singing by Coates and Red Bom- 
bay" by Reddick Mr. Shroyer who 
has appeared at various recitals be 
fore always pleases his audience with 
his mellow voice. 

Miss Krone closed the program 
with Bouree and Musette by Karge 
Elect, Bon Jour-Reiff and Sherzo in 
G minor — Bossi. As usual Miss 
Krone's numbers were ^atly appre- 
ciated because of the excellent man- 
ner in which they were played. 

Another of the spring recitals was 
given Tuesday, June 1st by Mildred 
Myers, piano; Mable Yingst, organ 
Leah Miller, voice; and Edgar Shroy 
er, voice. 

Miss Myers opened the program 
with a Sonata in A major by Scar- 
latti and ended the group with the 
well known Gavotte and Musette by 
d' Albert. Everyone loves to hear the 
sweet melody in Liszt's Liebestraum 
Miss Myers is to be complimented up 
on her interpretation of this piece 
Her last piece as well as all the 
others were well rendered technically 
We always like to hear Miss Miller 
sing with her clear high soprano 
voice. She sang The Ninety and Nine 
accompanied by Miss Hidai Hess on 
the organ. Everyone enjoyed the 
cheerful lively song "The Answer" 
by Terry. Her songs were all given 
in a commendable manner. 

This is the first time we have heard 
Edgar Shroyer sing at a recital The 
audience enjoyed his numbers and we 
will be eager to hear him again. 

Miss Yingst is to be praised for the 
exceptional manner in which her diff- 
icult pieces were renderd. The sweet 
pieces formed P delightful contrast to 
the rest of the program. 

The following program was render- 
ed: Sonata in A major, Scarlatti; 
Gavotte and Musette, d'Albert by 
Miss Myers. When Love is Kind, 
Night and the Curtains Drawn,Fer- 
rata, by Miss Miller; Sonata in D 
minor, Chorale (con moto Maestoso), 
Scherzo in moto pastorale, Toccata, 
Rogers by Miss Yingst; I attempt 
from Love Sicness, Purcell, The Asra, 
Rubenstein, Mr. Shroyer; The Ninety 



On Tuesday, May 24, Delphian and 
her friends enjoyed a delightful re- 
sume of the year, in the form of a 
Birthday Tea. The varoius months 
of the year were represented as 
follows: 

Flossie Dundore, as January, read 
poem, introducing the following 
months with appropriate sketches. 
Blanche Cochran ottered Cupids Ar- 
ows for February; Mildred Umholtz, 
an Irish reading for March; Anna 
Apgar, April; Mary Overly, May. A 
Novelty wedding under the direction 
of Fran Long told those present that 
June had arrived. July by Alice Woy 
furnished a deliglltful contrast to 
June; while a line of lovely oathing 
beauties carried everybody to Atlan- 
tic City in August. Miriam Daugherty 
proved a splendid teacher with the 
coming of September, which Violet 
Ferree and Frances Hammond ably 
represented October and November 
Louise Fencil, is December, orought 
her gifts in the form of a delightful, 
dainty lunch. 



FROM THE MAIL BAG 



PHILOS GIVE 

LAST PROGRAM 



The following programs were given 
in Philo on May 27 and June 3 re- 
spectively: 

Oration, Leroy Fegley; High Spots 
of my Freshman Year, John Snyder; 
The Mississippi Flood Problem, Will- 
iam Myers; Oration, Carl Sloat; and 
Living thoughts, Ralph Sprecher. 

Modern Aviation, Abraham Oohner; 
Summer Vocations, Harold Rider; 
The Work of Science in the Twen- 
tieth Century, Paul Dohner; W.hat 
One Year of Collge Life has done 
to Me, Paul Bf.rnhart; Senior Rem- 
iniscences, Luke S. Mimura, Samuel 
Clark, Wade S. Miller, Walter Zem- 
ski, Clarence Ulrich, Albert Kelchner, 
Leland Fackler,, Leroy Fegley and 
Homer Weist; Faculty ideas, Pro- 
fessors Bennett, Grimm, Bender and 
Wallace. 



DELPHIANS ELECT 

1st. TERM OFFICERS 



Editor, La Vie Collegienne. 
Dear Sir: — 

I noticed from the last issue of 
your paper that a certain Sammy Sal- 
mon is "very thoroughly dissatisfied 
and disgusted with some conditions 
which exist at Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege". I take this opportunity to ex- 
press my feelings on these same con- 
ditions in order to defend my Alma 
Mater and a few others. Mr. Salmon, 
— "If your feeling of revulsion is so 
great, as you say, why aot go to a 
college where this condition does not 
exist? Why not remain in your high 
school or in your home town? Why 
not go to a Male College in Utopia? 
There probably you would find 'Opti- 
mum' socializing! My dear friend, 
do not lose faith in your Alma Mater 
because of such conditions, for they 
exist in every college. It is a per- 
fectly natural thing,— it is even true 
to human nature. Tis true a /ariety 
of friendships is valuable, but who 
would sacrifice for the frivolus flirt- 
ing with a thousand girls, a quiet 
stroll with the one whom you admire? 
Why is a sailor's life never settled? 
Because he has a different sweet heart 
in every port. How true to life! Leb- 
anon Valley should be proud of her 
marriages because not one has result- 
ed in divorce. What is more valuable 
than to learn to know your life mate 
before marriage? And where is there 
a better place than in college? Cer- 
tainly not on the streets. vVhere 
could there be more in common to 
mould lives into perfect harmony? 
Who is so 'Democratic' that he will 
share his bride with the world in or- 
der that she may know other per- 
sonalities? Oh, my friend do not be- 
come discouraged with humanity. 
Some day probably you will appre- 
ciate the fact that other boys do not 
want to take your girl. 

I trust you will publish this in the 
defense of our Alma Mater from. 

A Satisfied Student 



With the closing of the year, Del- 
phian Society has been very much 
interested as to who should carry on 
her activities during the coming year. 
After careful consideration by the 
girls, the following officers for the 
opening term were appointed: 

President, Frances Long; Vice Pres- 
ident, Frances Hammond; Rcording 
Sec, Mildred Lane; Corresponding 
Sec, Helen Hand; Treasurer, Mildred 
Umholtz; Chaplain Ruth Cooper; 
Pianist, Alice Woy; Warden, Joseph- 
ine Schell. 

We congratulate these new officers 
and wish them much success. 



TWO SUMMER SES- 
SIONS SCHEDULED 

(Continued from Page 1) 



and nine, Campion, Miss Miller; Lieb 
straum Liszt, Ballode in A flat Chopin, 
Miss Myers; Who is Sylvia, Schubert, 
A Song of Waiting, Wright, Mr. 
Shroyer; Twilight, LaPrage, The 
Answer, Terry, Miss Miller; Berger- 
ade, Jacob, Dreams, Wagner, Offer- 
tory in E flat, Lefebure, Wely, Miss 
Yingst. 



The standards for our summer 
school are being raised yearly, mak- 
ing them consistent with those of our 
regular sessions. The following cours- 
es will be offered during the summer: 
at Annville: Bible, Education, Chem- 
istry, Mathematics, English, French, 
History, Economics and Political 
Science. At Harrisburg the courses 
offered are: Education, English, Latin, 
History, French, German, Mathema 
tics, Political Science and Sociology. 

The enrollment at both places is 
expected to be larger than ever this 
year. 



Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Studio and Home Portraits 
Films Printed and Developed 
Promptly 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Fo°d 



Win. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _ - _ _ _ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



We Recommend 

Shaeff er Lifetime 
Fountain Pens 

Absolutely the Best Pen 
Made, and Guaranteed 
to Last a Lifetime 

HARPEL'S 

757-759 Cumberland St. 
THE GIFT STORE OF LEBANON 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 

THE HUB 

713 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA. 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF QUALITY 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

36 North Eighth Street, LEBANON, PA. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1927 



i 



Kampus Kracks 



CHICK: (As the Ad. clock struck 
midnight) "Somehow I feel all wound 
up his evening." 

HOY: (Rather wearily) "Your 
main spring must be broken, or you'd 
surely go." 



Famous Slang Slingcrs 

Atlas balancing the globe, — -This is 
a hold-up. 

Napoleon, speaking about his sec- 
ond wife, — She gave me the heir. 

Charon, after ferrying a fat lady 
across the Styx, — Well, I put over a 
b>ig one that time. 

Nero, watching the temples of the 
Roman Gods as they burned, — Holy 
Smoke. 

Noah, addressing those who failed 
tD go aboard the ark, — You're all wet. 



ALBRIGHT TAKES 

ANNUAL B. B. GAME 



Question No. 49 (q) of recent Psy- 
chology intelligence test: ''Where do 
we find the word:, Do with your 
might what your hands find to do;" 
and what was the age in which the 
age in which the author lived?" 

To this 99% answered: "The words 
are found in chapel when ethe Pres- 
ident is there; the age is about 55." 

One percent were incorrect. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
their only earned run. The remain- 
der of Albright's runs were due to 
good base running and misplays by 
Zappia's teammates. Albright scored 
a run in each of the first three inn- 
ings on one hit per inning. The one 
in the third was scored on a piece of 
hard-luck, when Bendigo's throw to 
third hit the mnner and rolled out to 
left field, the man scoring. Sherrid 
pitched a masterful game allowing 
only five hits and striking out ten 
men. Zappia had fate against him 
and undoubtedly deserved better than 
a 6 — 1 decission against -him. 

Four of Lebanon Valley's players 
are first year men including the bat- 
tery. Their lack of experience was 
much in evidence during the game. 
The large crowd and the importance 
of the game unquestionably had some 
effect upon them. 

The score: 



Since the day of Paul Moser's 
"Health Talk," we notice that he has 
been brushing his teeth and using 
listerine regularly. He is also mak- 
ing a commendable showing on his 
"wash the hand chart." 



GOSSARDS 



HOLD 

SENIOR PARTY 



(Continued from Page 1) 

1st Episode Big Business 

All participating 

^2nd Episode Tug of War 

Ens, 2 contestants, 1 boy, 1 girl 
Rios, 2 contestants, 1 boy, 1 girl 
3rd Episode _ .Organization of Band 
Lucky Sports 
All participating 

4th Episode Football 

Ens — 11 girls Rios — 11 girls 

5th Episode Human Croquet 

Ens — 5 boys, 1 girl 
Rios — 5 boys, 1 girl 
Balls — 4 boys 

6th Episode Basket Ball 

Ens — 5 boys Rios -5 boys 

intermission 
Red Lemonade 

7th Episode Glee Club 

All participating 

8th Episode Tennis 

Ens — 1 boy, 1 girl Rios — 1 boy, 1 girl 

'9th Episode "Merry-Go-Round" 

Ens — 2 boys Rios— 2 boys 

10th Episode Base Ball 

Ens — 4 boys, 5 girls 
Rios — 4 boys, 5 girls 

11th Episode Society Stunts 

12th Episode College "Bred" 

After the program one or the 
hosts announced that the class would 
be taken for a ride. They were taken 
to Chef's where the last number of 
the program was given, in the form 
of a banquet. 

It was the yast, time that the Senior 
Class will meet in such a large body 
as the date of their graduation is so 
near. But this evening will well be 
remembered by all as one of the most 
delightful ever spent in their four 
years at Lebanon Valley. 



NOTICE STUDENTS 



Please lift your Quitties as 
soon as possible. Mr. Pugh is in 

!LA VIE office each day, at hours 
which are announced daily. Seniors 
I who have ordered books are re- 
t quired to lift them before grad- 
! uation . 



L. V. CLOSES 1927 

BASEBALL SEASON 

(Continued from Page 1) 

LEBANON VALLEY 

Hendricks, rf 3 1 

Albright, cf 4 

Wentz, 3b-lf 3 2 1 3 

Gelbert, ss 2 2 114 1 

Piersol, lb 3 1 10 1 i 

Piela, lf-cf 3 2 1 4 

Bendigo, c 4 12 7 10 

Moyer, 2b 4 1 3 2 

Hagar, p 3 1 3 2 

Zappia, rf 1 

x Wood 1 

Smith, 3b 

Totals 31 7 7 27 14 4 

SUSQUEHANNA 



LEBANON VALLEY 

Hendricks, rf 5 2 2 

Albright, cf 5 1 2 

Wentz, ss 5 3 3 2 

Bendigo, c 3 2 1 

Piersol, lb 4 1 2 8 

Piela, If 4 114 

Moyer, 2b 3 2 2 1 

Zappia, p 10 110 

Smith, 3b 4 10 10 

Hagar, p 3 10 10 

Metoxen, c 2 110 

x Gelbert 

Totals 39 3 11 24 7 3 



PENN STATE 








LEBANON VALLEY 

Hendricks, rf 4 

Albright, cf 4 

Wentz, 3b 4 1 

Gelbert, ss - 4 11 

Piersol, lb 3 1 

Bendigo, c 4 1 

Piela, If 3 

Moyer, 2b 3 

Zappia, p 2 1 

x Metoxen 1 

Totals 32 1 4 24 9 2 



2 
2 


3 



1 
1 



ALBRIGHT 



111 
119 

1 

1 14 

1 1 

2 
1 1 
1 





2 

1 




Gazul, ss 4 

Angle, c 4 

Kearns, 2b 3 

Shoop, lb 4 

Griggs, 3b 3 

Clemens, cf 4 

Sherid, p 4 

Weaver, If 4 

Brown, rf 2 

Haney, rf 

Totals 32 6 7 27 17 3 

L V._ 1 0—1 

Albright 1 1 1 2 1 x— 6 

Earned Runs, L. V. 1, Albright 1; x 
batted for Piela; Two-base hits, Clem- 
ens; Home runs Gelbers; Double play, 
Gazul, Griggs; Struck out, by Zappia 
1; Sherid 10; Left on bases, L. V. 6 
Albright 6; First base on called balls, 
off Zappia 3; off Sherid 2; Passed on 
balls, Bendigo 2. 

Umpires, Griffith and Houck. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET ,ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



Good, 2b 5 

Kertz, If 4 

Groce, cf 5 

Roof, lb 5 

Baird, c 5 

Moyer, rf 2 

Heim, ss 5 

Livingstone, 3b ___ 4 

Lyons, p 4 

Buchman, rf 2 

Totals 41 

Susquehanna 
L. V 



1 2 3 4 1 
2 
112 
1 11 2 1 
12 6 10 
0') 

2 4 4 
2 1 
2 
10 
5 13 24 14 2 

30000110 0—5 

00030220 x— 7 



2 5 1 

3 2 
6 J 
10 
3 
1 1 
10 



x Wood batted for Albright; Sac 
rifice Hits, Piersol; Two-base hits. 
Piela, Bendigo, Piersol, Good; Three- 
base hits, Wentz, Gelbert Heim; 
i Double play, Heim, Good, Roof; 
Stolen bases, Gelbert, Wentz 2, Groce: 
Struck out, by Hagar 3; by Living- 
stone 5; First base on balls, off Hagar 
3; off Livnigstone5; Hit by pitcher, 
Piela. 
Umpire— Gallagher. 



Kent, ss 4 2 1 

Robbelar, 2b 3 3 2 

Lungren, lb 5 1 1 

Delp, If 5 2 2 

Hamas, rf 4 

Wolff, 3b 4 

Singley, cf 4 1 

Harington, c 3 2 2 10 

Page, p 4 13 10 

Totals 36 11 12 27 8 2 

L. V. 0000003 0—3 

Penn State ___3 1040003 x— 11 

x Batted for Wentz in 9th; Two 
base hits, Piersol; Three-base hits, 
Piersol; Home runs Delph, Page; 
Stolen Bases, Kent; Sruck out, by 
Zrppia 1; by Hagar 1; by Page 7; 
First base on called balls, off Zappia 
2; off Hagar 2; off Page 3 



LEBANON VALLEY 



Hendricks, rf 4 

Albright, cf 3 

Wentz, If 3 

Gelbert, ss 5 

Bendigo, c 4 

Piersol, lb 5 

Piela, p 5 

Moyer, 2b 4 

Smith. 3b 4 

Totals 37 

JUNIATA 









2 








1 


1 


2 







1 





1 








2 


3 





4 





1 


3 


12 











1 


7 


1 








1 


2 














1 


1 


1 





1 





2 





5 


10 


27 


8 


1 

X 



1 

11 
12 5 

3 



10 



6 1 

L 

1 3 27 









1 



1 





5 2 
8 2 



Weeler, ss 3 

Shaeffer, c 3 

Beeny, rf 3 

W. West, cf 3 

Weimer, 3b 4 

McClain, If 3 

Bolger, p 4 

C. West, lb 4 

Snyder, 2b 4 

Totals 31 

L V — 2 1 1 1—5 

Juniata 1 0-1 

Two-base hits, Bendigo 2, Piela, 
Three-base hits, Albright, Beeny; 
Home run Gelbert; Double play, Gel- 
bert to Moyer to Piersol; Stolen oases 
Wentz, Gelbert 2, Hendricks 2; Struck 
by Piela 10: Dy Bolger 10; First base 
on called bals, oft Piela i; off Bolger 
9; Hit by pitcher, McClain: 

Umpire — Stevens. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

Annville _ Pa- 
Bowling and Billiards 




from your old 
shoes-Werepair 
them lots of wear 



ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR 
COMPANY 



Fine 

Home-Made 
Candies 

LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 

A fine place to treat your 
friend 

TSCHUDY'S 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. O. Bldg. 
West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



NO 




DROPS 
USED 

DR. HARRIS GRUMAN 

Eyesight Specialist— Optometrist 

GLASSES REPAIRED 
10 N. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
^ Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON, 



PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

UNION EMBLEM CO VALLE * trust building 

^ w PALMYRA, PA. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

„ lt ^ The Home of 

College Text Books and High Grade Stationery- 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharn" Ppnril« p™„ * 

HARRY W. LIGHT 

43 EAST MAIN STREET, 

' ANNVILLE. PA-